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By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
In a move its supporters say is designed to bring professionalism and credibility to a long-beleaguered agency, the Baltimore City Liquor License Board has won state approval to automatically boost employee salaries by up to 23.5 percent.Under a bill approved by the General Assembly and signed into law last week by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the pay increases for the chief inspector, inspectors, secretaries and other personnel at the liquor board will go into effect Oct. 1.Indictments expectedThe approval comes as sources within the liquor licensing agency say that indictments of liquor board employees are expected within days as the result of a long-standing investigation by Stephen Montanarelli, the state prosecutor.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
The chief inspector of the Baltimore liquor board told one of his inspectors early last year to warn the operators of a Fells Point bar of an impending undercover investigation into underage drinkers.In a wiretapped telephone conversation played yesterday in Circuit Court, Anthony J. Cianferano, the chief inspector, called inspector Michael Hyde and instructed him to call the Fells Point Cafe and warn the manager that police were planning to send in underage drinkers."It would be a good idea if you can get hold of him and tell him that they put him on the list," Cianferano told Hyde in the conversation Feb. 12, 1998.
NEWS
December 29, 1996
Millard B. Horton, 88, chief inspector of policeMillard Barclay Horton, who rose from patrolman to second in command during a 35-year career with the Baltimore Police Department, died of pneumonia Tuesday at a Florida nursing home. He was 88 and lived in St. Petersburg, Fla.At his retirement in 1966, Mr. Horton was chief inspector -- the last person in the department to hold the rank that was second only to the commissioner. He also was acting commissioner for several months in 1965 when the commissioner was ill."
NEWS
August 28, 1992
Martin A. DinisioLiquor board inspectorMartin A. Dinisio, a contractor and chief inspector for the Baltimore liquor board, died Monday at St. Joseph Hospital as the result of a stroke last Thursday after heart surgery.A Mass of Christian burial for Mr. Dinisio, who was 71 and lived on Greenhill Avenue in Hamilton, will be offered at 9 a.m. today at St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Church, 4414 Frankford Ave.Mr. Dinisio became a part-time investigator for the liquor board in 1971 and a full-time inspector in 1979.
NEWS
January 28, 2003
IRAQ - SURPRISE, surprise - is not cooperating. The chief U.N. weapons inspector delivered his long-awaited report yesterday, and said that Saddam Hussein's regime was not coming clean on questions of disarmament and in fact does not appear to have accepted the idea that the country should disarm. Does this mean war? The White House is all but saying so - in that more-in-sorrow-than-in-anger sort of tone that the self-righteous like to adopt. But we would argue that it's the wrong question.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
The state prosecutor has subpoenaed the personal financial records of a top enforcement official in the Baltimore liquor board as part of a wide-ranging investigation of allegations of corruption at the agency.Chief inspector Anthony J. Cianferano said that his records were subpoenaed recently. He referred all questions to his attorney, Robert Steinberg, who could not be reached for comment despite repeated calls.Sources have told The Sun that State Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli is probing charges that some former city liquor inspectors, while on the board's payroll, routinely serviced video poker machines belonging to William J. Madonna Jr., a politically connected former bar owner who was recently a candidate for the top administrative job at the board.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | May 7, 1998
A former state legislator and the chief inspector of the Baltimore liquor board were indicted yesterday on charges they were involved in a 10-year bribery scheme to thwart enforcement of state liquor laws.The three-count indictment announced by state Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli accuses former bar owner and former Del. William J. Madonna Jr., 46, of masterminding a conspiracy under which he controlled the appointment and promotion of liquor license inspectors and then bribed them to go easy on bar owners, himself included.
NEWS
June 19, 1991
George Joseph Murphy, retired chief inspector of the city police force, a lifelong Baltimore resident, died after a stroke Sunday at the Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 88.Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Robert C. Altenburg funeral establishment, 6009 Harford Road.He attended Baltimore Polytechnic Institute for a year before starting to work for the railroad. Mr. Murphy joined the police force as a patrolman in 1930 and rose through the ranks to the second-highest job on the force.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - David Kay, who led the U.S. effort to find banned weapons in Iraq, said yesterday after stepping down from his post that he has concluded that Iraq had no stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons at the start of the war last year. In an interview with Reuters, Kay said he thought that Iraq had illicit weapons at the end of the 1991 Persian Gulf war but that the subsequent combination of U.N. inspections and Iraq's own decisions "got rid of them." Asked directly if he was saying that Iraq did not have large stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons in the country, Kay replied, according to a transcript of the taped interview made public by Reuters, "That is correct."
NEWS
By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 1997
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -- He thought the job might take just six months. He thought -- because, to his logical Swedish mind, this was only logical -- that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein would cooperate immediately with postwar weapons inspectors because Iraq badly needed to resume selling its oil. Rolf Ekeus admits now that he made a miscalculation -- a 66-month miscalculation.Instead of six months, it has so far taken six years, and still counting. Ekeus has left his job as the chief U.N. weapons inspector for Iraq a wiser and more worried man. In an interview in Stockholm, he expressed grave concerns that Iraq will go back to producing weapons of mass destruction while a world community that has lost interest in the Persian Gulf war and its consequences looks the other way.Now about to become Sweden's ambassador to the United States, Ekeus is deeply worried that Iraq is still hiding weapons, particularly biological ones.
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