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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Robert M. Douglass, former chief engineer of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant, died Monday of cancer at his home in Port Republic, Calvert County. He was 88. The son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker, Robert Mann Douglass was born in Hartford, Conn., and raised in Wethersfield, Conn., where he graduated in 1942 from Wethersfield High School. He served as a paratrooper with the 11th Airborne in the Pacific and with occupying forces in Japan during World War II. After the war, he enrolled at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., where he earned his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1950.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Allen E. Alban, former chief engineer with Kraft Foods whose career spanned 47 years and who was known as the "Mayor of Stevenson," died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 100. The son of farmers, Allen Earl Alban was born and raised in Albantown in northern Baltimore County. He attended county public schools until the sixth grade. Mr. Alban went to work for the old Western Maryland Dairy in 1932, which later became Sealtest Foods and finally Kraft Foods.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
William K. "Bill" Lee III, who rose from being a State Roads Commission laborer to chief engineer for the State Highway Administration, died Tuesday from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 82. "What Bill Lee had was the very rare combination of people and technical skills. Not all technical people have people skills, but he knew how to manage and everyone loved him," said William K. Hellman, a former state transportation secretary and a former partner in the Baltimore civil engineering firm of Rummel Klepper & Kahl.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Robert A. "Cappy" Moncure, a retired civil engineer who had been chairman of the board and executive vice president of Century Engineering Inc., died Aug. 18 from complications of a stroke at his Mays Chapel home. He was 89. The son of a chemist and a homemaker, Robert Ambler Moncure was born in Lynchburg, Va., and raised on the family's dairy farm in Stafford, Va. After graduating from Stafford High School in 1942, he began his college studies at Virginia Military Institute, and then left in 1943 to enlist in the Marine Corps.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1999
Robert F. Schwatka, a retired chief engineer who worked aboard Baltimore tugboats for nearly 40 years, died Friday of injuries sustained in a traffic accident on Interstate 81 near Christiansburg, Va. The Monkton resident was 71.Mr. Schwatka was Florida-bound when the Bluebird Motor Coach he was driving had a blowout, causing the vehicle to swerve and hit the jagged mountainside at the edge of the road. He was pronounced dead at the scene.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Schwatka's long-time love affair with the sea began as a 16-year-old growing up in Middle River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
DeLacy L. "Cookie" Cook, a World War II merchant mariner and retired port captain for United States Lines who later became chief engineer of the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Monday of sepsis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Lutherville resident was 85. Mr. Cook was born in Pasadena, Calif., and raised in Santa Ana, Calif., where he graduated from Santa Ana High School. "Why did I go to sea? I lived at the beach in California, spent a lot of time there growing up. I just fell into it," he told former Sun editor and John W. Brown volunteer Ernest F. Imhoff, whose book Good Shipmates chronicled the story of the reactivation in Baltimore of the World War II-era Liberty ship.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
Janet McCreary Daum, 99, assistant to Md. chief engineer Janet McCreary Daum, 99, former administrative assistant to the chief engineer of the State of Maryland, died Monday of respiratory failure at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. The former Janet McCreary was born and raised in Harlem Park and graduated from Baltimore public schools. She attended business school before marrying Lloyd A. Daum in 1930. He died in 1972. For 30 years until retiring in 1965, the former Ten Hills resident had worked in the office of the State Chief Engineer.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
Martin L. Jones, a retired electronics defense worker and former radio station chief engineer, died April 8 of complications from cancer at Rock Glen Nursing Home in Catonsville. The Ellicott City resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook, he was a 1930 graduate of Forest Park High School and attended the Johns Hopkins University. Interested in electronics at an early age, he tinkered in his basement and made a working microphone from a Hershey metallic candy wrapper and a magnet.
NEWS
By Kenichi Ohmae | March 2, 2010
During the past few decades, Toyota has built a strong presence in the United States by serving its consumers well and doing what the U.S. government has wanted. Now, it has stumbled badly, largely because its greatest strength -- the Toyota way of "accumulation of small improvements," or kaizen philosophy -- has turned out to be a weakness in the age of complex electronic engines. There is every reason to believe Toyota will fix its technical and management problems. The question is whether, panicking in the very un-Japanese glare of the American media and political spotlight, it will dig a deeper hole by losing the air of trust and reputation for competence among customers it has spent so long building up. That would be bad for Toyota and for America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Walter Scott Brown, a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer whose career overseeing the railroad's infrastructure spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville of complications from a fall he suffered last month. Mr. Brown, who family members said "remained sharp until the end of his life," was 106. The son of a building contractor and a homemaker, Walter Scott Brown was born at home in Lafayette Square, where he was raised.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
William K. "Bill" Lee III, who rose from being a State Roads Commission laborer to chief engineer for the State Highway Administration, died Tuesday from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 82. "What Bill Lee had was the very rare combination of people and technical skills. Not all technical people have people skills, but he knew how to manage and everyone loved him," said William K. Hellman, a former state transportation secretary and a former partner in the Baltimore civil engineering firm of Rummel Klepper & Kahl.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Robert M. Douglass, former chief engineer of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant, died Monday of cancer at his home in Port Republic, Calvert County. He was 88. The son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker, Robert Mann Douglass was born in Hartford, Conn., and raised in Wethersfield, Conn., where he graduated in 1942 from Wethersfield High School. He served as a paratrooper with the 11th Airborne in the Pacific and with occupying forces in Japan during World War II. After the war, he enrolled at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., where he earned his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1950.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Walter Scott Brown, a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer whose career overseeing the railroad's infrastructure spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville of complications from a fall he suffered last month. Mr. Brown, who family members said "remained sharp until the end of his life," was 106. The son of a building contractor and a homemaker, Walter Scott Brown was born at home in Lafayette Square, where he was raised.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 1, 2012
It's often hard to tell the good guys from the bad guys in Baltimore. Today's victim is all to frequently tomorrow's suspect. And so it goes with Stanley Brunson, with a reputation that put him on the front mind of the city's top cop: A man described by the city's police commissioner as an “engine for violent crime” was arrested Saturday night and charged with killing one man and wounding another in a shooting earlier this month in West Baltimore....
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 18, 2011
Glenn H. Lahman, a pioneering television broadcast chief engineer who never lost his affection for old tube radios, died of cancer Oct. 10 at his Annapolis home. He was 86. Born in Bucyrus, Ohio, he left a farming community for the Valparaiso, Ind., Technical Institute, an engineering school. He then joined the Army and served in Europe during World War II. He landed at Normandy in July 1944 while in the Second Armored Division and later fought in the Battle of the Bulge. In later years, Mr. Lahman wore his original master sergeant uniform in the St. Patrick's Day Parade and in the Annapolis Memorial Day Parade.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Sunday, at the Baltimore Grand Prix, Craig Hampson's mind was racing. See the headset the chief engineer of the Newman-Haas team was wearing? One voice screamed into Hampson's right ear; another one bombarded the left. It was his job to digest it all, from his spot in the team's pit box, his eyes darting to computer banks telling Hampson the ever-changing status of car, driver and even the racecourse itself. Was it time to gas up, change tires, adjust the shocks and springs? For two hours, drivers Oriol Servia and James Hinchcliffe sped down city streets at 160 mph, relying on Hampson and his two assistants to make snap decisions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Allen E. Alban, former chief engineer with Kraft Foods whose career spanned 47 years and who was known as the "Mayor of Stevenson," died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 100. The son of farmers, Allen Earl Alban was born and raised in Albantown in northern Baltimore County. He attended county public schools until the sixth grade. Mr. Alban went to work for the old Western Maryland Dairy in 1932, which later became Sealtest Foods and finally Kraft Foods.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Edward Henry Schneider Jr., a retired Baltimore City engineer and founder of a Lutheran congregation, died of a stroke Tuesday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville, he attended Hamilton Junior High School and was a 1935 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He worked at the Locke Insulator Co. in South Baltimore while earning his civil engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he was assigned to a post classified as secret.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Edward Henry Schneider Jr., a retired Baltimore City engineer and founder of a Lutheran congregation, died of a stroke Tuesday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville, he attended Hamilton Junior High School and was a 1935 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He worked at the Locke Insulator Co. in South Baltimore while earning his civil engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he was assigned to a post classified as secret.
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