Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChicken Stock
IN THE NEWS

Chicken Stock

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 5, 2000
The elixir that makes soup a cure-all or transforms rice into pilaf is a rich chicken stock -- a leisurely infusion of chicken, lots of aromatic vegetables and herbs. Making homemade stock takes time, although considering the results, it's time well-spent. Besides, once the stock makings are simmering, they need almost no attention for several hours. The results will be more flavorful, more robust, and more economical than canned broth or bouillon cubes. And once you discover the benefits of having a supply of homemade stock in the freezer, you'll use it at least once a week for soups, stews, sauces, rice, pasta, and for poaching, braising and deglazing poultry, fish and other foods.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
Kit Waskom Pollard | April 15, 2013
The menu at Bel Air's Pairings Bistro changes throughout the year, evolving to highlight the best products from each season. This spring, Chef/owner Jon Kohler is serving small, succulent spring chickens, roasted and served with fresh peas and local mushrooms. Pairings Bistro 2105 Laurel Bush Road | Suite 108 | Bel Air, MD 21015 410-569-5006 | pairingsbistro.com Roast Poussin with Wild Mushrooms and Spring Pea Ragout Serves 6 Poussins: 6 poussins (spring chickens, preferably from KCC Natural Farms in Forest Hill)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 2000
Last fall I led a group of good friends on a weeklong wine-and-food tour through Burgundy. During our short stay in this eastern area of France, we visited wineries during the day and dined in restaurants in the evening. It had been a long time since I had traveled in this region, and I had forgotten just how delicious Burgundian food is. Night after night, the chefs amazed my companions and me with their incredible creations. Such dishes as a terrine of foie gras and smoked duck breast served in one restaurant and a savory gateau of guinea fowl and fresh artichokes offered in another were true works of art, but were too complex to reproduce in my home kitchen.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Chef Rebecca Pauvert reflects: “I chose this recipe because it is one of my favorites. It has great flavors, it's comforting and it's a recipe that you can increase if you want and enjoy for a couple of nights. It only gets better.” Braised Chicken Basquaise with red peppers and artichokes Ingredients: •    olive oil •    ½ pound chorizo •    2 small red onions, cut in 6 wedges •    2 red peppers, cut in ½-inch strips •    4 Cornish game hens, halved •    4 plum tomatoes, quartered •    8 small artichoke hearts, halved •    6 cloves garlic •    2 cups chicken stock, plus •    Juice of 1 lemon •    ¾ cup sherry •    sea salt and ground black pepper Directions: 1. Heat oil in large braising pan. Brown chorizo slightly, add red onions and red peppers and toss a few times.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Chef Rebecca Pauvert reflects: “I chose this recipe because it is one of my favorites. It has great flavors, it's comforting and it's a recipe that you can increase if you want and enjoy for a couple of nights. It only gets better.” Braised Chicken Basquaise with red peppers and artichokes Ingredients: •    olive oil •    ½ pound chorizo •    2 small red onions, cut in 6 wedges •    2 red peppers, cut in ½-inch strips •    4 Cornish game hens, halved •    4 plum tomatoes, quartered •    8 small artichoke hearts, halved •    6 cloves garlic •    2 cups chicken stock, plus •    Juice of 1 lemon •    ¾ cup sherry •    sea salt and ground black pepper Directions: 1. Heat oil in large braising pan. Brown chorizo slightly, add red onions and red peppers and toss a few times.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | October 11, 1998
As the days of autumn get cooler and cooler, thoughts turn to hearty soups. A cup of chicken soup with fresh corn is a satisfying way to begin a meal, and a bowlful makes a meal all by itself.Fresh corn adds substance and sweetness to this chicken soup. Prepare the chicken and stock a day or two ahead and refrigerate it until needed. Chili oil is available in the Asian-food section of most supermarkets and at Asian-food markets.Cole Publishing GroupChinese Chicken Stock1 chicken (3 to 3 1/2 pounds)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Warmer-than-usual weather notwithstanding, January is the sick season - the time when flu cases usually peak. When illness creeps into your house, nothing soothes like homemade Chicken Noodle Soup. You might be tempted to just open a can, but homemade soup is so tasty and simple that Christopher Nasatka, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, uses it as a way to have students practice their knife skills. A basic mirepoix - a mixture of chopped carrots, onions and celery - flavors chicken or turkey cooked as you like.
FEATURES
By Eating WellUnited Feature Syndicate | January 6, 1993
A bowl of good soup brims with the message of soun nutrition. Soup has it all: vitamins, minerals, protein, complex carbohydrates. With the exception of cream soups, most soups are not high in fat to begin with, and much of the fat they do contain can be skimmed off the surface after simmering. Any one of the following hearty soups, if accompanied by a slice or two of whole-grain bread, will provide more than enough protein to anchor a hearty meal.Recipes containing grains, potatoes or beans -- such as escarole and rice soup with chicken, or Portuguese potato and kale soup -- provide complex carbohydrates.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 14, 1999
Let the good times roll with a Mardi Gras dish that leaves the cook free to two-step instead of standing guard in the kitchen. This chicken and Cajun sausage jambalaya can be made ahead, whenever it's convenient. A quick trip to the store for French bread, pecan pralines or pecan ice cream, and chicory coffee rounds out the preparation for this supper of Louisiana favorites.Andouille (pronounced awn- DWEE) is a heavily smoked, coarsely ground, spicy Cajun sausage. Outside of Louisiana, it is available in specialty-food stores and through mail-order and online sources.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | October 30, 1991
CRISP, COOL EVENINGS call for hearty, filling meals. This classic chili recipe, with chunks of sirloin and kidney beans, is delightful.The onion and Cheddar muffins are very easy to prepare and have an interesting crunch.Add a fresh green salad and a hearty glass of burgundy to round out the meal.The recipes are from a "Mary Emmerling's At Home in the Country" published by Clarkson Potter Publishers; 1991 -- $30.00.Chili a la Mary1 1/2 pounds boneless sirloin, cut into 3/4 -inch chunks1 tablespoon vegetable oil1 large yellow onion, chopped1 each yellow, red and green bell pepper, coarsely chopped1 to 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped2 large garlic cloves, chopped1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes1 6-ounce can tomato paste1 cup chicken stock1/4 cup minced Mexican chili pepper, optional1 tablespoon ground cumin1 teaspoon red pepper flakes1 teaspoon rubbed sage1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper2 15-ounce cans dark red kidney beans1 to 2 generous --ed Tabasco or to tasteIn large skillet, brown the beef and drain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Chicken is everywhere, from road-side shacks to four-star restaurants. The problem with chicken these days is that it has been bred more for quantity than quality. Luckily in the past few years, local farmers have been producing chickens that have amazing flavor and texture (and that are raised in much better conditions than typical supermarket birds). At the farmers markets around the area, chicken is one of the easier products to find now that most vegetables are out of season. This recipe is perfect for the cold weather.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Anna Biebl from Belcamp was looking for a recipe for spinach soup. She said the Double T Diners serves one that she is particularly fond of and she wanted to be able to make it — or something similar — at home. Elaine Martin of Short Hills, N.J., sent in a recipe for fresh spinach soup that she found on the web from Earthbound Farm Organic products (www.ebfarm.com). While this may be different than what is served at the diner, it is nonetheless quite delicious and healthy to boot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2010
Peggy Everett of Salisbury was looking for a recipe that ran a few years ago in The Baltimore Sun for fish chowder made with a firm white fish and fresh crab meat. Faith Hermann of Relay thought she might have the recipe to which Everett was referring. She said the recipe for Rockfish and Crab Chowder that ran in the Sun in 2006 came from Brendan Keegan Jr., executive sous-chef at O'Leary's Seafood restaurant in Annapolis. She said "it is delicious, of course, because it starts with bacon."
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | June 2, 2007
In the early days of my career as a cooking teacher, I was fascinated by the creative aspects of my work. I loved to take traditional recipes and give them new twists. One of my first inventions was a paella salad offered in a course on summer salads. Saffron-scented rice was combined with cooked shrimp, julienned red and green bell peppers and fresh herbs, then tossed in a red wine vinaigrette. Almost overnight, this recipe became a smash hit with my students. Repeatedly, they told me that the paella salad was one of their favorite entrees.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | May 9, 2007
Imagine a beautifully nuanced sauce built from a stock you've made in your own kitchen, coaxed from bones and aromatic vegetables and herbs. Imagine the slow pot, the beautiful machinery of a recipe, the way a dish can be assembled by degrees: stock from bone, sauce from stock, and from that sauce a dish to crown a perfectly realized meal. Yet a sauce is only as good as the ingredients used to make it. Which, for many sauces, means that a sauce is only as good as the stock that serves as its foundation.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Warmer-than-usual weather notwithstanding, January is the sick season - the time when flu cases usually peak. When illness creeps into your house, nothing soothes like homemade Chicken Noodle Soup. You might be tempted to just open a can, but homemade soup is so tasty and simple that Christopher Nasatka, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, uses it as a way to have students practice their knife skills. A basic mirepoix - a mixture of chopped carrots, onions and celery - flavors chicken or turkey cooked as you like.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
James Backas has worn a lot of hats in his time -- musician, teacher, music critic, publishing executive, and now, director of the Maryland State Council for the Arts. But one hat that's never been far from his head, figuratively speaking, is the chef's toque.As a teen-ager in the Midwest, he began working in his father's restaurant, and though he pursued a career as a musician, he found that cooking was "a good second income to fall back on." For a few years, he cooked all over the world, in restaurants, on cruise ships and in hotels.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 3, 1996
It's soup weather out there. Whether it's a creamy vegetable-based opener or a hearty entree, homemade soup evokes the warmth of the hearth, the glow of an early evening sunset.A favorite soup for chef Katie Schma is smoked butternut squash soup. The blend of squash, apples, carrots, onions and chicken stock "tastes just like what it sounds like -- buttery," she says. Although she smokes the squash for the restaurant version, the soup still has plenty of flavor without this step."The apples and carrots give it sweetness," she says, noting that the soup has a lovely golden color, indicating it's rich in beta carotene.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 25, 2006
Recently I came down with a bad case of laryngitis and a chest cold. The doctor told me to take it easy - he doesn't know me very well! - so for a few days I attempted to rest, read and recline. Gradually my voice returned, and I felt better. But when I looked at the calendar I noticed that we had out-of-town friends coming soon for dinner and to spend the night. Not feeling up to a big meal, I was worried about the menu. But then I remembered a delicious fall soup I had recently prepared for a Saturday lunch.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2005
Lee Tillman from Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe for an Italian vegetable and bread soup called "Ribollita" that she had when she was in Florence, Italy. Anne Brusca of Columbia sent in her recipe for Ribollita that she says is a specialty of Italy's Tuscany region. The word means twice baked and is aptly applied to this dish because it is, in fact, cooked twice. Brusca says, "It is a lot of work to make but well worth the effort." I would agree completely. The only change I made to her recipe was that I decided to prepare the soup one day and then bake it with the bread and cheese for the second time the following day. The end result was a marvelously thick and delicious one-pot meal, more like a stew than a soup.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.