Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChicken Feed
IN THE NEWS

Chicken Feed

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Chicken farmers nationwide have stopped feeding their flocks a drug containing arsenic since a 2011 government study suggested the cancer-causing metal may be tainting poultry, but Maryland lawmakers are still struggling with whether to ban the once-widespread practice. Health advocates and environmental activists squared off Wednesday in Annapolis with poultry industry officials over a bill that would prohibit feeding chickens and turkeys any additive containing arsenic. Proponents called it a matter of prudence, while opponents warned it could hurt Maryland's leading agricultural sector, already struggling to stay profitable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Reid Detchon | September 11, 2013
Oil is essential to our economic and national security because our transportation system runs on it. The danger of this monopoly is that consumers must pay whatever price is charged for gasoline or diesel. The danger to our nation is that our foreign policy and military strategy are hostage to the need to protect oil supplies in the Middle East. The only way out of this box is to give consumers something new — a choice in fuels. The most powerful step that Washington has ever taken toward energy independence — the goal of half a dozen presidents, including George H.W. Bush, for whom I served in the Energy Department — was a 2007 law that put us on a path toward a competitive transportation fuel market through the production and consumption of renewable fuel in America.
Advertisement
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 5, 2012
A proposed state ban on arsenic in chicken feed won final Senate approval today, with supporters saying the amended measure protects both farmers and consumers while Eastern Shore lawmakers warn it could drive off the state's poultry industry. The Senate voted 32 to 14 in favor of banning the sale or use of the poultry-feed additive roxarsone or any other drug containing arsenic, but only after carving out an exemption for another arsenic-laced medicine used to treat sick turkeys.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
As of New Year's Day, arsenic is officially off the menu for Maryland chickens. The nation's first statewide ban on the use of additives in chicken feed containing the toxic metal is among a dozen new state laws that take effect Jan. 1. The new civil marriage measure that was affirmed by Maryland voters in November, allowing same-sex couples to take their vows, has grabbed the most headlines, but less-publicized laws will take effect as well....
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 7, 2012
Maryland's General Assembly adopted today a ban on arsenic additives in chicken feed, which if signed into law would make the state the first in the nation to take such a step to keep the toxic chemical out of food and the environment. By a vote of 101-31, the House of Delegates gave final approval to the bill , ending a lengthy debate over the issue that had pitted environmentalists and food safety advocates against the state's major poultry industry.  Similar measures had failed to pass since 2009.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 10, 2007
POCOMOKE CITY -- Carole Morison steps into a vast metal building where 27,200 chicks cluster in darkness around feeding machines. Pipes pump a gray, gravelly mush into round steel bowls. Along with the corn, fat and protein being snapped up by the young birds is Roxarsone - a feed additive made from arsenic. Perdue Farms requires Morison to feed it to her chickens to fatten them and fight parasites. "It's very disturbing to me that people are being exposed to this arsenic, but we don't have a choice - we have to feed the chickens what the company gives us," says Morison, a contract grower who has been raising chickens on her Eastern Shore farm for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
A prominent researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health says the poultry industry's widespread use of drugs to raise chickens is exposing people who eat them to more arsenic than previously estimated. In a paper published yesterday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, Ellen K. Silbergeld said arsenic-laced drugs designed to keep the birds healthy might pose an increased risk of cancer for consumers and create manure that is contaminating Eastern Shore ground water.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
Three years ago, Maryland-based Perdue Farms stopped using feed treated with the antibiotic roxarsone, which contains arsenic. The company found that with better management of its flocks and contract chicken houses, the drug wasn't needed to keep chickens healthy. Unfortunately, too many in the industry have failed to follow suit. A recent study released by a Washington-based consumer advocacy group Food & Water Watch found poultry available in supermarkets contains three times more arsenic than other meats.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
For years I wondered what ever happened to the dark meat of the chicken. None of the restaurants I patronized had it on the menu, I'd noticed. Somebody told me it was being sent to feed the starving Russians. As I said, I worried about this for years. Then one day it all came clear to me after I had lunch with the pope.This is no joke. I did have lunch with the pope, as surely as I flew to Europe once on the Concorde. Understand, I'm not relating these experiences to exhibit the deep texture of my life, or for any other self-promoting purpose.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 11, 1993
Bill wants to save Boris' tail with emergency aid, and each member of Congress losing a military base expects the same courtesy.The top pol in Japan hid $50 million under the mattress. Mexico's president hit grateful entrepreneurs for $25 million contributions to good government. Everybody in Italy does it. Our graft is chicken feed.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
Well, they did it. The Maryland General Assembly wasted so much time on same-sex marriage, arsenic in chicken feed, and off-shore wind (just harness the wind coming from Annapolis and they won't need it), they couldn't pass a budget ("Time runs out in capital," April 10). They'll need another session needed now costing more money needlessly squandered. Now you have Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael Bush squabbling. This state, led by an inept governor who deludes himself into thinking he is presidential material, is a shame.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly sunny skies, with gusty winds and a high temperature in the mid 60s. There is a 30 percent chance of showers tonight, with lows in the low 40s around the Baltimore area. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... General Assembly approves ban on arsenic in chicken feed : Maryland's General Assembly adopted a ban on arsenic additives in chicken feed, which if signed into law would make the state the first in the nation to take such a step to keep the toxic chemical out of food and the environment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 5, 2012
State senators are scheduled to take a final vote today on whether to ban the use of arsenic in poultry feed, with proponents arguing it's needed to protect Marylanders and the Chesapeake Bay while Eastern Shore lawmakers contend it's unwarranted meddling with the state's poultry industry. Chicken and turkey producers have long used roxarsone, a veterinary drug containing arsenic, to treat common avian diseases and to plump up their birds. But the practice has raised concerns for human health and the environment.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Maryland farmers produce no crop more valuable than chickens. The state ranks eighth nationally, and the 1.4 billion pounds of broilers grown each year are valued at more than $600 million, or roughly 40 percent of all the state's crops added together. Yet the industry is in danger of harming itself - and others - with its continued opposition to a proposed ban on arsenic in chicken feed. How can poultry producers possibly oppose taking a known carcinogen out of the food chain?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.