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Chicken And Waffles

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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2002
They're big hits in New York, Los Angeles and Atlanta. But even though there's a reference to a Baltimore chicken-and-waffle house in Broadway's smash musical Hairspray - which takes place in the early 1960s - one such eatery has only recently come to Charm City. (And, no, Baltimore filmmaker John Waters did not make that historical mistake in the movie Hairspray). ShamDanai's Chicken-n-Waffle House opened Mother's Day at 4701-03 Eastern Ave., in the spot previously occupied by Costa's European Pastries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Granny's Restaurant may be right next to the food court in Owings Mills Mall, but it's far from your typical mall food. Soul food is Granny's specialty — served with a smile. Named after Chef Valerie Dorsey's 106-year-old grandmother, Granny's moved from its old home down the street to a space three times bigger at the mall. Granny's has been at its new digs for eight months now, and its staff is beginning to feel at home. While the owners have done some renovation, the ghost of the previous tenant, a Chinese restaurant, still haunts the place.
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NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2003
When it comes to famous food pairings, chicken and waffles may raise a few eyebrows, their savory and sweet merger a culinary mystery to the uninitiated. Yet this quirky taste combination, popular for decades in some African-American and other ethnic communities, has gone mainstream. Crispy fried chicken and light, golden waffles are turning up together on restaurant menus and specialty eateries nationwide, including in Baltimore. "When we moved here from New York three years ago, we noticed there wasn't a chicken-and-waffle place," says Sham Hodges who, with wife Danielle, owns ShamDanai's on Eastern Avenue, billed as the city's first chicken-and-waffle house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
A new restaurant opened up Aug. 7 in the old Ixia space. Old-timers still call it the old Louie's Bookstore & Cafe space. The owner is Tegist Alayew, who has run two restaurants in Washington in the same U Street corridor location. The first, Gogo Cottage , which had a menu of Ethiopian food, ran for about six years until Alayew replaced it with Creme Cafe , a still-hopping Southern-style restaurant best known for its Sunday brunch. Think chicken and waffles. The good times at Creme Cafe, Alayew knows, might not last forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2009
B10 South turned out to be an ace bistro, attached to a really popular (at least this month) big nightclub named LuX. It's not easy to pull off a nightclub/restaurant combo - there's always the danger of one dragging down or overwhelming the other, and this Calvert Street address has seen more than its share of comings and goings. Things might work out better here, for several reasons. One is that there's a real effort to keep the restaurant and nightclub operations separate, both physically - B10 South is on the bottom level, LuX is above it - and thematically.
NEWS
By CELIA C. PETERS and CELIA C. PETERS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU knew soul food inside and out, here comes something else to make your mouth water. Unusual, maybe -- delicious, definitely. Make way for fried chicken ... and waffles!?! Yes, and brought to you by none other than Gladys Knight and Ron Winans' Chicken and Waffles Restaurant, a sleek, suburban eatery brimming with sophisticated soulful flavor. The Largo site is the third site in the family franchise, which originated in Atlanta. Gladys Knight is an Atlanta native, but the enterprise is the brainchild of her son, Shanga Hankerson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
A new restaurant opened up Aug. 7 in the old Ixia space. Old-timers still call it the old Louie's Bookstore & Cafe space. The owner is Tegist Alayew, who has run two restaurants in Washington in the same U Street corridor location. The first, Gogo Cottage , which had a menu of Ethiopian food, ran for about six years until Alayew replaced it with Creme Cafe , a still-hopping Southern-style restaurant best known for its Sunday brunch. Think chicken and waffles. The good times at Creme Cafe, Alayew knows, might not last forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Granny's Restaurant may be right next to the food court in Owings Mills Mall, but it's far from your typical mall food. Soul food is Granny's specialty — served with a smile. Named after Chef Valerie Dorsey's 106-year-old grandmother, Granny's moved from its old home down the street to a space three times bigger at the mall. Granny's has been at its new digs for eight months now, and its staff is beginning to feel at home. While the owners have done some renovation, the ghost of the previous tenant, a Chinese restaurant, still haunts the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
Have some pie, urged the dreadlocked man sitting near the front of ShamDanai's, Baltimore's first chicken-and-waffle restaurant. He added that he made them himself. Well, who could say no to that? Though we were already full, we ordered two pies, Southern sweet potato and apple, as well as a wedge of the pound cake that looked so pretty in the pastry case. Ever the difficult customer, I asked for whipped cream on my apple pie. Though it wasn't on the menu, the low-key and efficient waitress said no problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
John Houser III reviews Granny's in Owings Mills. Valerie Dorsey moved her pork chops, peach cobbler and chicken and waffles to Owings Mills Mall last March. How are they doing at Owings Mills Mall, you ask? Houser tells you . What's your favorite place to eat a mall?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2009
B10 South turned out to be an ace bistro, attached to a really popular (at least this month) big nightclub named LuX. It's not easy to pull off a nightclub/restaurant combo - there's always the danger of one dragging down or overwhelming the other, and this Calvert Street address has seen more than its share of comings and goings. Things might work out better here, for several reasons. One is that there's a real effort to keep the restaurant and nightclub operations separate, both physically - B10 South is on the bottom level, LuX is above it - and thematically.
NEWS
By CELIA C. PETERS and CELIA C. PETERS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU knew soul food inside and out, here comes something else to make your mouth water. Unusual, maybe -- delicious, definitely. Make way for fried chicken ... and waffles!?! Yes, and brought to you by none other than Gladys Knight and Ron Winans' Chicken and Waffles Restaurant, a sleek, suburban eatery brimming with sophisticated soulful flavor. The Largo site is the third site in the family franchise, which originated in Atlanta. Gladys Knight is an Atlanta native, but the enterprise is the brainchild of her son, Shanga Hankerson.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2003
When it comes to famous food pairings, chicken and waffles may raise a few eyebrows, their savory and sweet merger a culinary mystery to the uninitiated. Yet this quirky taste combination, popular for decades in some African-American and other ethnic communities, has gone mainstream. Crispy fried chicken and light, golden waffles are turning up together on restaurant menus and specialty eateries nationwide, including in Baltimore. "When we moved here from New York three years ago, we noticed there wasn't a chicken-and-waffle place," says Sham Hodges who, with wife Danielle, owns ShamDanai's on Eastern Avenue, billed as the city's first chicken-and-waffle house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
Have some pie, urged the dreadlocked man sitting near the front of ShamDanai's, Baltimore's first chicken-and-waffle restaurant. He added that he made them himself. Well, who could say no to that? Though we were already full, we ordered two pies, Southern sweet potato and apple, as well as a wedge of the pound cake that looked so pretty in the pastry case. Ever the difficult customer, I asked for whipped cream on my apple pie. Though it wasn't on the menu, the low-key and efficient waitress said no problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2002
They're big hits in New York, Los Angeles and Atlanta. But even though there's a reference to a Baltimore chicken-and-waffle house in Broadway's smash musical Hairspray - which takes place in the early 1960s - one such eatery has only recently come to Charm City. (And, no, Baltimore filmmaker John Waters did not make that historical mistake in the movie Hairspray). ShamDanai's Chicken-n-Waffle House opened Mother's Day at 4701-03 Eastern Ave., in the spot previously occupied by Costa's European Pastries.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Another week, another restaurant takeover. These takeovers, pop-ups and collaborations are getting to be a regular thing. We love them. This time, the chef on the road is David Alima, co-owner and "master creamer" at The Charmery, Hampden's home of hand-crafted ice-cream. Alima will be doing the guest-cheffing thing at Shoo-Fly Diner for a special Sundaes takeover tonight. Alima is partnering with Opie Crooks, Shoo-Fly's chef-de-cuisine, to create an ice-cream tasting menu, pairing up some of Shoo-Fly's favorite dishes with original ice cream creations from The Charmery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Dinner at DelMarVa's Southern Cafe isn't exactly the same as a meal at a charming, out-of-the-way Eastern Shore diner. But it's close. The eatery, which opened this September in the old broom factory building on the Canton-Brewers Hill border, takes its inspiration from the region's comfort food, with a focus on specialties like fried chicken, Virginia ham and crab cakes. For the most part, the kitchen did these local favorites justice. The restaurant's brick walls, sturdy wooden furniture and friendly vibe lend the place a decidedly down-home-on-the-Shore feel.
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