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By Jasmine Wiggins | March 8, 2011
Lying in bed, the boyfriend and I debated dinner. “I could roast a chicken,” I said. “Roast a chicken? Why don’t we just get Thai food?” he asked. “Because,” I said, “this is the best roast chicken you’ve ever had in your life.” He eyed me skeptically. After a few hours and complaints that he was growing hungry, he shuffled over to the stove and stared at the browned bird. He sawed off a piece when I wasn’t looking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Thank you for staying on top of Maryland's chicken companies for their unfair advantage in our state's politics ( "Perdue's ruffled feathers," Sept. 22). I've been an avid supporter of Food & Water Watch for many years and appreciate their hard work highlighting that not only does Jim Perdue "have a seat at the table," he also has a seat in the governor's mansion. It's time for "big chicken" to pay their fair share. Stephanie Compton, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
April 24, 2012
In their continuing campaign against animal protein and modern agriculture, the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health has published findings that, in my opinion as a microbiologist and veterinarian, defy logic and sound science. Their studies examined "chicken feather meal," not meat, and claim from an extremely small sample size to have found trace amounts, in some cases a fraction of one part per billion, of caffeine, arsenic, banned antibiotics and ingredients found in Benadryl, Prozac and Tylenol.
FEATURES
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"LOOSE SEAL!!" If you find yourself walking around with a couple hundred "Arrested Development" catchphrases in your head but no one to shout them at, here's your big chance. Actor Tony Hale, who played the reality challenged youngest Bluth son, Buster, will be making two appearances later this month in Baltimore to promote his children's book, "Archibald's Next Big Thing. "   The first event, An Evening with Tony Hale, will be held at the Calvert School on North Charles Street.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 13, 2012
More than a dozen chickens died in a fire in their chicken coop in Havre de Grace Monday night. The fire was discovered shortly before 8 p.m. by David E. Toney, who owned the 8-by-6-foot chicken coop that was attached to a 10-by-12-foot shed in the 4100 block of Gravel Hill Road. It started accidentally when a heating lamp inside the coop had fallen and ignited nearby combustibles, according to a press release from the Maryland State Fire Marshal. The chicken coop was a complete loss and 13 chickens died in the fire.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
We think Buffalo sauce instantly makes almost any chicken sandwich twice as tasty. As for toppings, we want plenty of options - tomatoes, blue cheese and lettuce, at least. Here are four Buffalo chicken sandwiches from city bars and restaurants. The Greene Turtle 722 S. Broadway, Baltimore -- 410-342-4222 Hours --11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --8 minutes Even though it was the cheapest and came the fastest, this sandwich, $7.34, was disappointing.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | October 11, 2006
Sweet T&T 3539 Brenbrook Drive, Randallstown -- 443-426-7601 Hours --11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Thurdays; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; noon-6 p.m. Sundays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --5 minutes If the chicken in this large order, $9.98, was a little more tender, it would have been our choice for best bargain. The large serving of meat was sweet, tangy and peppery. It came on a bed of rice with sides of beans and fried plantains. Know of a good carryout place? Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
It's true. The Chicken 'n' Waffles food truck has pulled into town. The man behind the truck is Sterling Godfrey, who just recently moved his mobile operation from the D.C. suburbs to the streets of Baltimore. The specialty of the truck is the chicken-and-waffle combo ($9.50), and waffles and chicken all by themselves. You can get waffle plain ($6) or topped with strawberry or blueberry ($7.75). Orders of chicken wings begin at $2.60 for two and end at $10.40 for 10. Also on the menu: hamburgers, cheeseburgers, hot dogs, minced pork barbecue, and half-smokes, as wells as fish sandwiches (tilapia or whiting)
FEATURES
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"LOOSE SEAL!!" If you find yourself walking around with a couple hundred "Arrested Development" catchphrases in your head but no one to shout them at, here's your big chance. Actor Tony Hale, who played the reality challenged youngest Bluth son, Buster, will be making two appearances later this month in Baltimore to promote his children's book, "Archibald's Next Big Thing. "   The first event, An Evening with Tony Hale, will be held at the Calvert School on North Charles Street.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
A proposed settlement that could net consumers $5 million in refunds and coupons from the nation's largest poultry producer moved a step closer to fruition Friday when a federal judge signed off on the preliminary agreement. Judge Richard D. Bennett repeatedly expressed concerns about the $3 million in plaintiffs' attorneys' fees and court costs that could be paid by Tyson Foods under the terms of the settlement. Bennett said he would be hard-pressed to sign off on what he called such a disproportionate scale, with the plaintiffs' counsel set to get about 37.5 percent of the total, with consumers' refunds capped at $50. Consumer lawsuits were filed across the country in 2008 and later consolidated in Baltimore, accusing Tyson of lying about the drugs that go into its birds.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
With a gentle breeze blowing and temperatures in the low 80s, it was mild for a June afternoon on the Eastern Shore, but adjacent to the main attraction at the Queen Anne's County 4-H Park, it was hot as blazes. John Draper stood next to a 650-pound frying pan, stirring 140 pieces of chicken in 160 gallons of bubbling soybean oil with a pair of giant tongs. His face was flushed. The hair on his forearms was singed. And as the line of hungry customers grew to 100 people and more on Friday afternoon, he pondered why he'd decided to volunteer at the 65th Delmarva Chicken Festival, which will be the last, as old-time marketing gives way to more modern demands.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For the children visiting the Pearlstone Center's sustainable farm Sunday, the chickens and baby goats might have been the main event. But supporters of the Family Farm Day said they hope that interaction will be the start of a deeper connection with faith and the environment. "It touches something deeper than themselves," said Sharon Goldman Wallach, 38, who attended the day with her father and two young daughters. "It's a double hit. " The Pearlstone Center event was one of the kickoff activities for Baltimore Green Week, a weeklong affair launched in 2004 as part of a Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 19, 2014
The cult centered on "global warming" alarmism is getting hot under the collar. People seem to have stopped paying attention and polls show "climate change" barely registers on a list of voters' concerns. This can only mean, as losing politicians like to say, that their message isn't getting through. What to do? Why shout louder, of course. A recent story in The New York Times sought to help alarmists raise the decibel level: "The countries of the world have dragged their feet so long on global warming that the situation is now critical, experts appointed by the United Nation sreported Sunday, and only an intensive worldwide push over the next 15 years can stave off potentially disastrous climatic changes later in the century.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 14, 2014
In the history of presidential campaign books, Theodore H. White's "The Making of the President" series in the 1960s set the standard for campaign books to follow. He combined unique access and a sweeping view of the process to help voters judge the candidates and understand the quadrennial exercise as well. Teddy White was a pleasant and avuncular figure who gained that access through a combination of fairness and sympathetic schmoozing. It was once said, disparagingly, that Mr. White was the kind of reporter who could always go back to his sources, meaning he never gave offense to them in what he wrote.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
I was appalled to read Tim Wheeler 's report on efforts to reduce farm pollution ( "Senators seek to stall pollution regulations," March 10). University of Maryland scientists say we already have far too much manure on many fields. So why are we putting off decreasing excess manure? It makes no sense. The article refers to "nutrients" and "inventory," but let's be clear what that means: Billions of pounds of manure are choking the life out of the Chesapeake Bay. I had a good laugh when I read that the economic impact study referred to in the article will be done by the "Franklin Perdue School of Business.
NEWS
By Bill Satterfield | March 14, 2014
In a commentary published March 6 in The Baltimore Sun, Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?, the authors, both of the Food & Water Watch organization, claim that the chicken companies operating on Maryland's Eastern Shore are the "bay's biggest polluters" and that they are getting a free ride on the backs of the taxpayers. Also, they claim that chicken manure, a heavily regulated and locally produced organic fertilizer, is the cause of "massive pollution" of the Chesapeake Bay. The facts speak otherwise.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
A tagine (pronounced "tah-zheen") is a hallmark of Moroccan cooking. The slow-simmered stew mingles meats and vegetables with spices, such as cumin and cinnamon. This Moroccan Stew With Roasted Vegetables pairs chicken and prunes, an ancient combination that continues to offer good nutrition. Sometimes marketed as "dried plums," prunes are a quick source of energy and aid in the absorption of iron. A quarter cup of the fruit contains 317 milligrams of potassium, which promotes heart health.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
On average, about 2,600 bills are introduced during a 90-day General Assembly session, so governors rarely have much to say about 99 percent of them, at least not until they've at least had a public hearing or perhaps even a committee vote. But that wasn't the case with Senate Bill 725, which apparently is so distasteful that Gov. Martin O'Malley promised to veto it within days of its mere introduction in Annapolis. Not only did he threaten to veto it, but Mr. O'Malley even publicly used that phrase offered by President George H. W. Bush to "read my lips" that he wouldn't approve the new tax (apparently ignoring the irony of a Democratic governor quoting a Republican president on a promise he so infamously reversed course on)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 12, 2014
Even though the " Poultry Fair Share Act " stands no chance of becoming law, the sponsor of the controversial bill to tax Maryland's chickens refuses to give up, saying he wants to have a public discussion on who should pay to control polluted farm runoff fouling the Cheapeake Bay. Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. said Wednesday that despite a veto threat from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the withdrawal of a companion House bill, he doesn't plan...
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