Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChick Webb
IN THE NEWS

Chick Webb

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
To get your Fourth of July off to a swinging step, I just had to share what must be the coolest version of John Philip Sousa's famous march "Stars and Stripes Forever. " Recorded in 1939, this brilliantly swinging blast from the past is by the big band of Baltimore's own Chick Webb, one of the greatest talents in jazz history. Crank up the volume and set your patriotic toes tappin'.   
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
To get your Fourth of July off to a swinging step, I just had to share what must be the coolest version of John Philip Sousa's famous march "Stars and Stripes Forever. " Recorded in 1939, this brilliantly swinging blast from the past is by the big band of Baltimore's own Chick Webb, one of the greatest talents in jazz history. Crank up the volume and set your patriotic toes tappin'.   
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
Robert Foster's 12-foot pull-up jumper with four seconds left lifted Chick Webb over Oliver, 41-40, in last night's under-18 Baltimore Neighborhood Basketball League title game.The win avenged an earlier loss and prevented a three-title sweep by Oliver, which won both the under-13 and under-15 crowns in the six-game event at Lake Clifton High.The 6-foot-6 Foster (18 points) is a junior and one of four Dunbar players on Webb's squad. He played against a team that featured six Dunbar teammates, but was without Dunbar's 6-8 All-Metro center Norman Nolan, who had two teeth pulled earlier in the day."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Although Baltimore's connections to things like the "Star-Spangled Banner" and Edgar Allan Poe never lack for widespread attention, another of the city's claims to fame deserves a bigger boost. That's the aim of an engaging new book, "Music at the Crossroads: Lives and Legacies of Baltimore Jazz. " In addition to the appeal of the subject matter, the way the book came to be has its own attraction. It was produced and published largely by students of Loyola University Maryland, which has a student-staffed, faculty-mentored publishing company on campus.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | April 28, 1992
BATTLES of the big bands are making a comeback.Popular in the 1930s and 1940s, the big band battles are playoffs to see which of two or more competing bands can be the first to drive an audience crazy. You can attend 1992 versions of these swinging free-for-alls at Hunt Valley and other locations (usually promoted by WITH, the big-band station in Baltimore).But there was an historic, definitive and positively Olympian battle of the big bands in New York in 1937. It was staged before thousands of fans who came from all over the country just to see and hear it. The winner was a Baltimorean.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
Thousands of mourners turned out at Waters African Methodist Episcopal Church at 417 Aisquith St. on a warm summer's day in 1939, to say farewell to Chick Webb, the famous jazz-era band leader and East Baltimore native who had died earlier that month.Born and raised near Madison Street and Ashland Avenue, Webb sold newspapers as a boy and taught himself to play the drums in his spare time.Despite physical deformity, which resulted from a childhood fall down a flight of steps and left him in constant pain throughout his life, Webb went on to become a popular band leader and drummer whose popularity was rivaled only by that of Gene Krupa.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn | July 17, 2008
Jazz competition The lowdown: The Chick Webb Jazz Combo Competition honors the legacy of Baltimore's Chick Webb, whose performances as a jazz drummer made him the premier drummer of the swing era. Several performers are slated to compete, including Phil Ravita Jazz Group, David McGarvey Trio, Bay Jazz Project, The Lionel Lyles Quintet and Todd Marcus Quintet. If you go: The competition is Saturday at the Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St. Performances run 3 p.m.-5 p.m., and the winner will perform at Artscape on Sunday.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 25, 1995
IF YOU HAPPEN be in the area of Howard and Pratt streets early on one of these summer evenings, keep an eye out for a street act that fits squarely into the continuum of Baltimore history. That's the area where a young black man frequently plays a set of "drums" -- actually the bottoms of overturned garbage cans. If you don't believe that this street musician may eventually have a promising career as a jazz drummer, you may not know or may have forgotten the story of William Henry "Chick" Webb.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2002
There is a world of difference in the lives of 13-year-old Terence Miales of East Baltimore and Amir Ghaferi, 21, a first-year student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. But they're both participants in a tutoring program that is trying to bridge a gap between Hopkins and its impoverished neighbors. "When I came to this city, it was a shock," Ghaferi, who is from California, said of the disparate conditions of the gleaming medical institutions and some of the dilapidated nearby East Baltimore communities.
NEWS
December 31, 1998
FIVE DECADES after the big band industry faded away, America is dancing to swing again. But instead of Benny Goodman or Artie Shaw, the bandstands feature the likes of Royal Crown Revue, Cherry Poppin' Daddies and Brian Setzer.The Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey ghost bands still entertain the geriatric set on tours and ocean cruises. Contemporary zoot-suiters and bobby-soxers, though, prefer a jumpier style, one that mixes rock with Count Basie and Louis Jordan.This retro-swing movement started on the West Coast nearly a decade ago. This year, thanks to MTV and a Gap commercial, the craze hit the East Coast in a big way.The composition of a retro-swing orchestra is not very different from a 1930s big band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn | July 17, 2008
Jazz competition The lowdown: The Chick Webb Jazz Combo Competition honors the legacy of Baltimore's Chick Webb, whose performances as a jazz drummer made him the premier drummer of the swing era. Several performers are slated to compete, including Phil Ravita Jazz Group, David McGarvey Trio, Bay Jazz Project, The Lionel Lyles Quintet and Todd Marcus Quintet. If you go: The competition is Saturday at the Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St. Performances run 3 p.m.-5 p.m., and the winner will perform at Artscape on Sunday.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 23, 2007
Always with an upbeat attitude and sharp sense of humor, Ruby Glover worked for more than 50 years to keep jazz alive in Baltimore. Her work continued long after many of the city's greatest musicians left to find fame and fortune elsewhere. Not only was Glover a witty performer with an impeccable sense of timing and rhythm, but she also was a tireless educator and mentor to the city's burgeoning jazz artists. She conceived and helped establish the Billie Holiday Vocal Competition, taught a jazz-appreciation course at Sojourner-Douglass College and led tours along the fabled stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue that featured clubs and bars where Glover honed her craft in the 1940s.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Close-Ups: Psychoanalysts Look at Film," the 25th annual film and lecture series from the Baltimore Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis, opens tonight with Gavin Hood's Tsotsi (2006), an Oscar-winning South African film starring Presley Chweneyagae as a street tough who finds unsuspected levels of humanity within himself when he kills a woman and steals her car, only to find his victim's infant child in the back seat. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, with post-film discussion led by psychoanalyst Silvia Bell.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
When Chick Webb - the nationally famous swing-era jazz drummer whose "Stompin' at the Savoy" was defined by long and furious riffs that drove crowds wild - died in 1939, his obituary in The Evening Sun rated a two-column headline. At the time, this was a rare honor generally accorded only those of social prominence, professional attainment or other movers and shakers. In truth, if anyone got crowds moving and shaking when he sat down to play the drums, it was Webb. He was born William Henry Webb in Baltimore in either 1902 or 1909 - there is some discrepancy as to which year is correct - and raised in poverty near Madison Street and Ashland Avenue.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2002
There is a world of difference in the lives of 13-year-old Terence Miales of East Baltimore and Amir Ghaferi, 21, a first-year student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. But they're both participants in a tutoring program that is trying to bridge a gap between Hopkins and its impoverished neighbors. "When I came to this city, it was a shock," Ghaferi, who is from California, said of the disparate conditions of the gleaming medical institutions and some of the dilapidated nearby East Baltimore communities.
NEWS
December 31, 1998
FIVE DECADES after the big band industry faded away, America is dancing to swing again. But instead of Benny Goodman or Artie Shaw, the bandstands feature the likes of Royal Crown Revue, Cherry Poppin' Daddies and Brian Setzer.The Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey ghost bands still entertain the geriatric set on tours and ocean cruises. Contemporary zoot-suiters and bobby-soxers, though, prefer a jumpier style, one that mixes rock with Count Basie and Louis Jordan.This retro-swing movement started on the West Coast nearly a decade ago. This year, thanks to MTV and a Gap commercial, the craze hit the East Coast in a big way.The composition of a retro-swing orchestra is not very different from a 1930s big band.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
When Chick Webb - the nationally famous swing-era jazz drummer whose "Stompin' at the Savoy" was defined by long and furious riffs that drove crowds wild - died in 1939, his obituary in The Evening Sun rated a two-column headline. At the time, this was a rare honor generally accorded only those of social prominence, professional attainment or other movers and shakers. In truth, if anyone got crowds moving and shaking when he sat down to play the drums, it was Webb. He was born William Henry Webb in Baltimore in either 1902 or 1909 - there is some discrepancy as to which year is correct - and raised in poverty near Madison Street and Ashland Avenue.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Close-Ups: Psychoanalysts Look at Film," the 25th annual film and lecture series from the Baltimore Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis, opens tonight with Gavin Hood's Tsotsi (2006), an Oscar-winning South African film starring Presley Chweneyagae as a street tough who finds unsuspected levels of humanity within himself when he kills a woman and steals her car, only to find his victim's infant child in the back seat. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, with post-film discussion led by psychoanalyst Silvia Bell.
FEATURES
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Sun staff | April 26, 1998
When people rattle off the list of upper-class enclaves - Guilford, Roland Park, Homeland; Woodbrook, Ruxton, Riderwood, etc. - seldom is there mention of Sudbrook Park. As people move in and move out, who is aware of Sudbrook as Frederick Law Olmsted's first Baltimore commission; as one of only three residential districts, nationally, that remain laid out to the plan of this first and greatest U.S. landscape architect?The general inattention may continue, but old residents of other Affluence Acres will now be a bit less comfortable.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
Thousands of mourners turned out at Waters African Methodist Episcopal Church at 417 Aisquith St. on a warm summer's day in 1939, to say farewell to Chick Webb, the famous jazz-era band leader and East Baltimore native who had died earlier that month.Born and raised near Madison Street and Ashland Avenue, Webb sold newspapers as a boy and taught himself to play the drums in his spare time.Despite physical deformity, which resulted from a childhood fall down a flight of steps and left him in constant pain throughout his life, Webb went on to become a popular band leader and drummer whose popularity was rivaled only by that of Gene Krupa.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.