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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 24, 2001
For many years, Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 7 was viewed as the problem child among his orchestral output, a sprawling mass of sounds that refuse to behave. While the other eight completed symphonies gradually gained intense admiration, or at least respect, during the second half of the 20th century, the Seventh stood in the corner, craving attention. Today, the situation seems much brighter. A look at a major music retailer's online catalog finds nearly 30 different recordings of the Seventh currently for sale, a plethora once unthinkable.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 24, 2001
For many years, Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 7 was viewed as the problem child among his orchestral output, a sprawling mass of sounds that refuse to behave. While the other eight completed symphonies gradually gained intense admiration, or at least respect, during the second half of the 20th century, the Seventh stood in the corner, craving attention. Today, the situation seems much brighter. A look at a major music retailer's online catalog finds nearly 30 different recordings of the Seventh currently for sale, a plethora once unthinkable.
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NEWS
February 22, 1992
Andrew Schenck was well known in this area during the 1970s. He was the young associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony with the flying blond hair who conducted many pops, children's and run-out concerts. Then he moved away, as assistant and associate conductors are wont to do.Mr. Schenck moved back a few years ago and lived quietly, barely visible in Baltimore's musical life, but flying out to conduct in such places as New Zealand and Slovenia. Suddenly, after recordings made with London and New Zealand orchestras, Mr. Schenck was leading a worldwide revival of the American composer Samuel Barber.
FEATURES
By John von Rhein and John von Rhein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2001
This story ran in some earlier editions of yesterday's Sun. CHICAGO - When Daniel Barenboim raised his baton on the two cataclysmic chords that began the "Eroica" Symphony this week, the performance was about more than Beethoven's music. It symbolized the cultural bonds that can unite nations separated by centuries of political hatred, intolerance and ignorance. Barenboim's Beethoven orchestra was a group of gifted Israeli, Egyptian, Jordanian, Lebanese, Palestinian and other Mideast students.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 1995
An old friend visits the Annapolis Symphony at Maryland Hall this weekend.Ruben Gonzalez, distinguished co-concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and conductor and composer in his own right, comes to town to play the Beethoven Violin Concerto under Gisele Ben-Dor's baton, and to conduct a brief suite from his symphony "Dionisias and Lone Wolf."Mr. Gonzalez has appeared with the symphony twice before, soloing in the concertos of Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky.Ms. Ben-Dor, the orchestra's music director, will round out the concerts Friday and Saturday with the splashy "Pictures at an Exhibition," composed by Modest Mussorgsky and orchestrated so colorfully by Maurice Ravel.
FEATURES
By John von Rhein and John von Rhein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2001
This story ran in some earlier editions of yesterday's Sun. CHICAGO - When Daniel Barenboim raised his baton on the two cataclysmic chords that began the "Eroica" Symphony this week, the performance was about more than Beethoven's music. It symbolized the cultural bonds that can unite nations separated by centuries of political hatred, intolerance and ignorance. Barenboim's Beethoven orchestra was a group of gifted Israeli, Egyptian, Jordanian, Lebanese, Palestinian and other Mideast students.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 2, 1995
To state the obvious, it's been a miserable year for baseball. Probably the worst since the Black Sox Scandal.Besides last season's disastrous strike and its bitter aftertaste, the usual drug problems and the whining by players, there were other embarrassments.It was bad enough that wealthy stars from the present and past sold their autographs, but several recently pleaded guilty to not paying taxes on this easy pocket money.Even Mickey Mantle's surgery had many people saying that a lifelong lush didn't deserve a new and sober liver.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- Begin at the green of Grant Park, where Lake Michigan shimmers, and drive about two miles west along Madison Street.Before you arrive at the United Center, where the Democrats will convene Monday, you drive past the gracious old commercial buildings in the Loop, past the shiny new towers near the Chicago River. You cover blocks that were leveled by the urban renewal programs of the '60s and by the fires that burned after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.Within sight of the center, you find some of Chicago's infamous public housing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | June 2, 2002
If it's June, it must be time for the Eastern Shore Chamber Music Festival. The 17th annual event gets under way on Friday and runs through June 16 at various locations from Chestertown to St. Michaels. Once again, a notable lineup of musicians and repertoire has been assembled by the festival's co-artistic directors - cellist Marcy Rosen of the Mendelssohn String Quartet and clarinetist J. Lawrie Bloom of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. The opening program offers a trio of quintets - one by Mozart for horn and strings, one by Schumann for piano and strings, and one by Barber for woodwinds.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 20, 2004
The National Symphony Orchestra announced yesterday that its musicians have ratified a new four-year contract that increases minimum salaries about 13 percent, to $108,000, by the final year. Weekly base wages will rise from the current $1,844 to $2,077 in the 2007-2008 season. Musicians will assume more of their health insurance costs. For comparison, minimum weekly pay at the New York Philharmonic is $1,980 and will rise to $2,180 by the 2006-2007 season under a new contract. At the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the minimum is $1,400.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- Begin at the green of Grant Park, where Lake Michigan shimmers, and drive about two miles west along Madison Street.Before you arrive at the United Center, where the Democrats will convene Monday, you drive past the gracious old commercial buildings in the Loop, past the shiny new towers near the Chicago River. You cover blocks that were leveled by the urban renewal programs of the '60s and by the fires that burned after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.Within sight of the center, you find some of Chicago's infamous public housing.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 1995
An old friend visits the Annapolis Symphony at Maryland Hall this weekend.Ruben Gonzalez, distinguished co-concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and conductor and composer in his own right, comes to town to play the Beethoven Violin Concerto under Gisele Ben-Dor's baton, and to conduct a brief suite from his symphony "Dionisias and Lone Wolf."Mr. Gonzalez has appeared with the symphony twice before, soloing in the concertos of Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky.Ms. Ben-Dor, the orchestra's music director, will round out the concerts Friday and Saturday with the splashy "Pictures at an Exhibition," composed by Modest Mussorgsky and orchestrated so colorfully by Maurice Ravel.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 2, 1995
To state the obvious, it's been a miserable year for baseball. Probably the worst since the Black Sox Scandal.Besides last season's disastrous strike and its bitter aftertaste, the usual drug problems and the whining by players, there were other embarrassments.It was bad enough that wealthy stars from the present and past sold their autographs, but several recently pleaded guilty to not paying taxes on this easy pocket money.Even Mickey Mantle's surgery had many people saying that a lifelong lush didn't deserve a new and sober liver.
NEWS
February 22, 1992
Andrew Schenck was well known in this area during the 1970s. He was the young associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony with the flying blond hair who conducted many pops, children's and run-out concerts. Then he moved away, as assistant and associate conductors are wont to do.Mr. Schenck moved back a few years ago and lived quietly, barely visible in Baltimore's musical life, but flying out to conduct in such places as New Zealand and Slovenia. Suddenly, after recordings made with London and New Zealand orchestras, Mr. Schenck was leading a worldwide revival of the American composer Samuel Barber.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 24, 2000
When it comes to "crossover" music -- a loosely defined genre that fuses, in one way or another, classical and non-classical elements -- few artists have been more successful than Mark O'Connor. A brilliant fiddler and a prolific composer, O'Connor has collaborated with some of the brightest stars in the classical field, among them cellist Yo-Yo Ma and bassist Edgar Meyer (those two joined him for the 1996 hit recording of "Appalachia Waltz"). In 1997, O'Connor wrote a Double Concerto for Two Violins expressly for Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, who gave the world premiere with the composer and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra last month at the Ravinia Festival.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services Inc | August 21, 1992
In 1966, the Beatles upset sensibilities with their "Yesterday -- and Today" album cover picturing the Fab Four in butcher smocks amid chunks of meat and chopped-up parts of toy dolls.Public indignation led to a quick recall of the offending covers, most of which were destroyed by Capitol Records. The record was reissued in more ho-hum wrappings. More than a few shrewd folks surmised there might one day be some value to the banned covers.They were right. A stereo version of the original album in sealed, mint condition recently sold for $15,000.
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