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By Jim Kirk and James P. Miller and Jim Kirk and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 19, 2004
Conrad Black agreed yesterday to sell his controlling stake in the company that owns the Chicago Sun-Times, turning his media holdings over to multimillionaire British twins and giving the city's No. 2 paper its fifth owner in two decades. Stunning his critics, Black surrendered the business that gave him what he cherished: an extravagant lifestyle with a glittery array of influential political and social figures. Already forced to step down as chief executive officer of Hollinger International Inc. in November, Black's announcement came as investigators and shareholders had curtailed his power and largely blamed him for a scandal in which he and top deputies allegedly pocketed $90.2 million in unauthorized payments.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and other top members of the agency have visited counterparts in Chicago to observe their crime-fighting strategy, the latest in a series of efforts to adopt law enforcement practices around the country. Chicago since 2012 has led the U.S. in total homicides, though its 413 murders in 2013 were a five-decade low and the city's per-capita murder rate is less than half that of Baltimore.  Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy hit back against skeptics in an interview with the Chicago Sun-Times published Wednesday , saying his crime-reduction plans are working.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 17, 2005
CHICAGO - Hollinger International Inc., publisher of the Chicago Sun-Times, said yesterday that it settled a lawsuit over claims of inflated circulation at the newspaper and two other publications for a total of $15 million in cash and free advertising. The settlement will resolve most claims by advertisers arising from the inflated circulation figures, Hollinger said. It will pay $7.7 million in cash and give advertisers $7.3 million in free ads and discounts. The settlement doesn't cover lawsuits by four advertisers that the company is still negotiating with.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
Would you sell your home, put off retirement or dip into your 401(k) to buy a Lamborghini or Hermes handbag for your teenager? Didn't think so. Then why do so many status-minded parents insist on buying their kids a "designer" education at an expensive private university? Plenty of accredited public schools offer a better value and a solid education. A recent UCLA study said two out of three freshmen had "some" or "major" concerns about how they'll pay for college. In no way are public university students immune.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994
Investors sue Lehman BrothersA group of investors is suing Lehman Brothers Inc. for $100 million, claiming a predecessor of the securities firm used deceptive tactics to sell real-estate limited partnerships that were arranged in a way that left them worthless, said the group's attorney.The attorney said his clients filed suit, seeking class-action status, yesterday in U.S. District Court in Dallas on behalf of thousands of investors in four of 11 similar partnerships sold by E. F. Hutton in the 1980s that raised $250 million.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
Would you sell your home, put off retirement or dip into your 401(k) to buy a Lamborghini or Hermes handbag for your teenager? Didn't think so. Then why do so many status-minded parents insist on buying their kids a "designer" education at an expensive private university? Plenty of accredited public schools offer a better value and a solid education. A recent UCLA study said two out of three freshmen had "some" or "major" concerns about how they'll pay for college. In no way are public university students immune.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 29, 1998
CHICAGO -- The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that American Publishing Co. illegally fired a Michigan newspaper employee last year who refused to act as a replacement worker in the event of a strike by editorial employees at the Chicago Sun-Times.The ruling was hailed yesterday by Chicago officials of the Newspaper Guild as protection against workers being forced by their employers to be strikebreakers.The NLRB said American Publishing, a division of Hollinger International Inc., which owns the Sun-Times, had no authority to discharge Dwight Biermann, a computer systems coordinator at the Herald Palladium in St. Joseph, Mich.
FEATURES
By Michael Davis | April 11, 1993
"You're a fortunate man," John Schulian told me on the day I learned I would be moving to Baltimore to become executive sports editor of The Evening Sun.I hadn't been feeling all that fortunate during that unforgiving winter of 1984, and neither had he. John had built a national reputation for clear thinking and seamless prose from his base at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he was known as the thinking man's sports columnist.Since the days of Ben Hecht and "The Front Page," Chicago had been noted for its clanking typewriters and dot--- journalism.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and other top members of the agency have visited counterparts in Chicago to observe their crime-fighting strategy, the latest in a series of efforts to adopt law enforcement practices around the country. Chicago since 2012 has led the U.S. in total homicides, though its 413 murders in 2013 were a five-decade low and the city's per-capita murder rate is less than half that of Baltimore.  Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy hit back against skeptics in an interview with the Chicago Sun-Times published Wednesday , saying his crime-reduction plans are working.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
In the privacy of his Pennsylvania Avenue penthouse, Robert D. Novak must be loving this. The conservative Washington columnist has gleefully seized upon past political imbroglios as fodder for his articles. Now, he finds himself at the center of what may become the first true scandal of the Bush White House. And all from a brief - some say gratuitous - identification in a newspaper column of a diplomat's spouse as a CIA operative. In a July 14 column, Novak reported that two Bush administration officials said that the wife of former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, an outspoken critic of the Iraq war, was a CIA operative.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 17, 2005
CHICAGO - Hollinger International Inc., publisher of the Chicago Sun-Times, said yesterday that it settled a lawsuit over claims of inflated circulation at the newspaper and two other publications for a total of $15 million in cash and free advertising. The settlement will resolve most claims by advertisers arising from the inflated circulation figures, Hollinger said. It will pay $7.7 million in cash and give advertisers $7.3 million in free ads and discounts. The settlement doesn't cover lawsuits by four advertisers that the company is still negotiating with.
NEWS
By Jim Kirk and James P. Miller and Jim Kirk and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 19, 2004
Conrad Black agreed yesterday to sell his controlling stake in the company that owns the Chicago Sun-Times, turning his media holdings over to multimillionaire British twins and giving the city's No. 2 paper its fifth owner in two decades. Stunning his critics, Black surrendered the business that gave him what he cherished: an extravagant lifestyle with a glittery array of influential political and social figures. Already forced to step down as chief executive officer of Hollinger International Inc. in November, Black's announcement came as investigators and shareholders had curtailed his power and largely blamed him for a scandal in which he and top deputies allegedly pocketed $90.2 million in unauthorized payments.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
In the privacy of his Pennsylvania Avenue penthouse, Robert D. Novak must be loving this. The conservative Washington columnist has gleefully seized upon past political imbroglios as fodder for his articles. Now, he finds himself at the center of what may become the first true scandal of the Bush White House. And all from a brief - some say gratuitous - identification in a newspaper column of a diplomat's spouse as a CIA operative. In a July 14 column, Novak reported that two Bush administration officials said that the wife of former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, an outspoken critic of the Iraq war, was a CIA operative.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 29, 1998
CHICAGO -- The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that American Publishing Co. illegally fired a Michigan newspaper employee last year who refused to act as a replacement worker in the event of a strike by editorial employees at the Chicago Sun-Times.The ruling was hailed yesterday by Chicago officials of the Newspaper Guild as protection against workers being forced by their employers to be strikebreakers.The NLRB said American Publishing, a division of Hollinger International Inc., which owns the Sun-Times, had no authority to discharge Dwight Biermann, a computer systems coordinator at the Herald Palladium in St. Joseph, Mich.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994
Investors sue Lehman BrothersA group of investors is suing Lehman Brothers Inc. for $100 million, claiming a predecessor of the securities firm used deceptive tactics to sell real-estate limited partnerships that were arranged in a way that left them worthless, said the group's attorney.The attorney said his clients filed suit, seeking class-action status, yesterday in U.S. District Court in Dallas on behalf of thousands of investors in four of 11 similar partnerships sold by E. F. Hutton in the 1980s that raised $250 million.
FEATURES
By Michael Davis | April 11, 1993
"You're a fortunate man," John Schulian told me on the day I learned I would be moving to Baltimore to become executive sports editor of The Evening Sun.I hadn't been feeling all that fortunate during that unforgiving winter of 1984, and neither had he. John had built a national reputation for clear thinking and seamless prose from his base at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he was known as the thinking man's sports columnist.Since the days of Ben Hecht and "The Front Page," Chicago had been noted for its clanking typewriters and dot--- journalism.
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