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NEWS
April 15, 1992
Chicago is no accident. Two mighty river systems, the St. Lawrence and Mississippi, nearly touched. It was an easy canoe portage from the little Chicago River (leading to Lake Michigan and the St. Lawrence) to the Des Plaines River (flowing to the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico). Whoever held this spot controlled the heartland of North America: First the French, then the Mayors Daley.Like a statue with feet of clay or a palace built on sand, the American city stands on muck, landfill, crumbling masonry, disintegrating concrete, rusted iron, leaking mains, cracking conduit, ancient tunnels, relics of abandoned technology.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 14, 2014
Two very different perspectives on urban life are on view in the exhibit "The City: Paintings by Robert Tennenbaum and Linda Press" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. Tennenbaum's aerial views of various cities are from so high up in the sky that it's way beyond where birds fly and closer to what a satellite would photograph. The precise height does not really matter, though, because these are highly schematic depictions that abstractly treat a city's layout in terms of blue lines for rivers, a black-lined grid for city streets, and patches of green for parks.
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FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 1991
Q: I want to furnish my office with a Chicago River decor. Where can I find pictures, paintings, prints, maps, literature and other items relating to the river's present and past?A: Friends of the Chicago River is a not-for-profit river advocacy organization that offers a newsletter and other printed material, historical river trail walks, boat trips and tours, workshops and other benefits. Annual individual membership is $20, $35 a family, $15 for students and seniors, available from Friends of the Chicago River, 407 S. Dearborn St., Suite 1580, Chicago, Ill. 60605; phone (312)
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 22, 2007
I'm traveling to Chicago this summer with my husband, who will be attending a conference. Any suggestions for things to do on my own? The best way to get your husband out of his conference is to score two tickets to a Cubs game. That won't be easy, because most home games are sellouts and you'll have to pay premium prices to a ticket broker such as stubhub.com or gotickets.com. Otherwise, here are some ideas for you: If shopping and eating rank at the top of your list, the Magnificent Mile (themagnificentmile.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- Begin at the green of Grant Park, where Lake Michigan shimmers, and drive about two miles west along Madison Street.Before you arrive at the United Center, where the Democrats will convene Monday, you drive past the gracious old commercial buildings in the Loop, past the shiny new towers near the Chicago River. You cover blocks that were leveled by the urban renewal programs of the '60s and by the fires that burned after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.Within sight of the center, you find some of Chicago's infamous public housing.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 22, 2007
I'm traveling to Chicago this summer with my husband, who will be attending a conference. Any suggestions for things to do on my own? The best way to get your husband out of his conference is to score two tickets to a Cubs game. That won't be easy, because most home games are sellouts and you'll have to pay premium prices to a ticket broker such as stubhub.com or gotickets.com. Otherwise, here are some ideas for you: If shopping and eating rank at the top of your list, the Magnificent Mile (themagnificentmile.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 6, 1994
CHICAGO -- I pick up my friend at the Tribune Tower, and we walk up Michigan Avenue to find a place for lunch.As we walk, he brags about how well Chicago handles snow."
FEATURES
By Jane Wingle and Jane Wingle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 1997
"Make no little plans."Daniel H. Burnham, noted architect and city planner, took his words literally and grandly exemplified them in his famous Chicago Plan of 1909.The Windy City continues to reap the benefits of his vision. Visitors and natives alike experience his foresight and architectural inventiveness, along with scores of other magnificent towering structures, on a sightseeing cruise aboard Chicago's First Lady.Sponsored by the city's Architecture Foundation, the excursion is led by well-informed docents, as the boat, displaying the flair of a 1920s presidential yacht, meanders the Chicago River.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 14, 2014
Two very different perspectives on urban life are on view in the exhibit "The City: Paintings by Robert Tennenbaum and Linda Press" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. Tennenbaum's aerial views of various cities are from so high up in the sky that it's way beyond where birds fly and closer to what a satellite would photograph. The precise height does not really matter, though, because these are highly schematic depictions that abstractly treat a city's layout in terms of blue lines for rivers, a black-lined grid for city streets, and patches of green for parks.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Peter Jensen and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writers Staff Writer Ann LoLordo contributed to this article | April 19, 1992
Chicago redefined the urban nightmare last Monday when a section of abandoned tunnel ruptured and the Chicago River poured into downtown, wreaking hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.Could such a disaster occur in Baltimore, with its own century-old underground rail tunnels and aging system of water and sewer lines?Civil engineers contemplating such doomsday scenarios answer simply: No, the Chicago River doesn't come within 500 miles of here.In fact, the exact circumstances facing the Windy City are unique and unlikely to be duplicated elsewhere.
FEATURES
By Jane Wingle and Jane Wingle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 1997
"Make no little plans."Daniel H. Burnham, noted architect and city planner, took his words literally and grandly exemplified them in his famous Chicago Plan of 1909.The Windy City continues to reap the benefits of his vision. Visitors and natives alike experience his foresight and architectural inventiveness, along with scores of other magnificent towering structures, on a sightseeing cruise aboard Chicago's First Lady.Sponsored by the city's Architecture Foundation, the excursion is led by well-informed docents, as the boat, displaying the flair of a 1920s presidential yacht, meanders the Chicago River.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- Begin at the green of Grant Park, where Lake Michigan shimmers, and drive about two miles west along Madison Street.Before you arrive at the United Center, where the Democrats will convene Monday, you drive past the gracious old commercial buildings in the Loop, past the shiny new towers near the Chicago River. You cover blocks that were leveled by the urban renewal programs of the '60s and by the fires that burned after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.Within sight of the center, you find some of Chicago's infamous public housing.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 3, 1995
Here's one that will stump the kids: Name the city with the only river in the world that flows backward. A hint: This backward river turns Kelly green one day a year.We're talking about a town kids and parents both like, with a great, free zoo open every day of the year, the biggest aquarium in the country, a 150-foot-high Ferris wheel strung with thousands of tiny lights built so close to downtown it provides a super view of the skyline, and even a coal mine and submarine under one roof.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 6, 1994
CHICAGO -- I pick up my friend at the Tribune Tower, and we walk up Michigan Avenue to find a place for lunch.As we walk, he brags about how well Chicago handles snow."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Peter Jensen and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writers Staff Writer Ann LoLordo contributed to this article | April 19, 1992
Chicago redefined the urban nightmare last Monday when a section of abandoned tunnel ruptured and the Chicago River poured into downtown, wreaking hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.Could such a disaster occur in Baltimore, with its own century-old underground rail tunnels and aging system of water and sewer lines?Civil engineers contemplating such doomsday scenarios answer simply: No, the Chicago River doesn't come within 500 miles of here.In fact, the exact circumstances facing the Windy City are unique and unlikely to be duplicated elsewhere.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
Chicago is no accident. Two mighty river systems, the St. Lawrence and Mississippi, nearly touched. It was an easy canoe portage from the little Chicago River (leading to Lake Michigan and the St. Lawrence) to the Des Plaines River (flowing to the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico). Whoever held this spot controlled the heartland of North America: First the French, then the Mayors Daley.Like a statue with feet of clay or a palace built on sand, the American city stands on muck, landfill, crumbling masonry, disintegrating concrete, rusted iron, leaking mains, cracking conduit, ancient tunnels, relics of abandoned technology.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 3, 1995
Here's one that will stump the kids: Name the city with the only river in the world that flows backward. A hint: This backward river turns Kelly green one day a year.We're talking about a town kids and parents both like, with a great, free zoo open every day of the year, the biggest aquarium in the country, a 150-foot-high Ferris wheel strung with thousands of tiny lights built so close to downtown it provides a super view of the skyline, and even a coal mine and submarine under one roof.
NEWS
By Bob Secter and Bob Secter,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 1992
CHICAGO -- As Chicago struggled to bail out from its biggest public works disaster since the Great Fire of 1871, experts said yesterday that the subterranean river leak that shorted out the Loop highlighted the perilously neglected state of the nation's infrastructure."
NEWS
By Bob Secter and Bob Secter,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 1992
CHICAGO -- As Chicago struggled to bail out from its biggest public works disaster since the Great Fire of 1871, experts said yesterday that the subterranean river leak that shorted out the Loop highlighted the perilously neglected state of the nation's infrastructure."
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 1991
Q: I want to furnish my office with a Chicago River decor. Where can I find pictures, paintings, prints, maps, literature and other items relating to the river's present and past?A: Friends of the Chicago River is a not-for-profit river advocacy organization that offers a newsletter and other printed material, historical river trail walks, boat trips and tours, workshops and other benefits. Annual individual membership is $20, $35 a family, $15 for students and seniors, available from Friends of the Chicago River, 407 S. Dearborn St., Suite 1580, Chicago, Ill. 60605; phone (312)
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