Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChiapas
IN THE NEWS

Chiapas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 26, 2000
ELECTION of Sen. Pablo Salazar as governor of Chiapas ends the Institutional Revolutionary Party's (PRI) 71-year stranglehold on Mexico's poor, backward, southern state. That's an aftershock to the earthquake July 2, when the conservative Vicente Fox won Mexico's presidency. Senator Salazar is a left-winger who enjoyed the backing of eight political parties demanding change. This should lead to a speedy accommodation with the Zapatista National Liberation Army, which launched a showy rebellion in Chiapas six years ago that festers still.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  PALAVER People will talk, and a lot of it does not amount to much. So we have palaver  (pronounced puh-LAV-er), which Merriam-Webster's Unabridged  identifies as "profuse, idle, or worthless talk," or chatter. It can also mean "misleading or beguiling speech. "  The word, which came into English in the mid-eighteenth century from the Portuguese palavra  ("word," "speech")
Advertisement
NEWS
January 4, 2000
The Chiapas Partnership Project of the Howard County Friends of Latin America will sponsor a talk by a Baltimore attorney about her time as a volunteer human rights monitor in Chiapas, Mexico. The presentation will begin at 6: 30 p.m. Saturday in the Meeting House, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia. Information: 410-740-1231.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 30, 2007
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- Rick Bayless examined the dusky-brown disk, about the size of a quarter and several times as thick, in a zip-top plastic bag. It was the last of more than a dozen unfamiliar foods he intended to identify for the group of travelers. "What is this?" he said. Everyone in the room laughed. Stumping Bayless - a renowned Mexican food authority whose Frontera Grill in Chicago just won the James Beard award for outstanding restaurant - was something participants would revel in for the rest of the trip.
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | January 9, 1994
Last week Mayan Indians descended from the hills to surround, capture and kill several myths about Mexico.In a well-coordinated attack New Year's Day, as many as 2,000 Indian soldiers captured four towns in the poor southern state of Chiapas. In so doing, the Mayan soldiers exploded Al Gore's pro-NAFTA assertion that whatever one may think about its politics, Mexico has been stable for more than 70 years.The revolutionaries attacked on the day the North American Free Trade agreement went into effect and cited the agreement as a reason for their uprising.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 9, 1994
TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, Mexico -- Two men have taken the oath of office to be governor of the deeply divided southern state of Chiapas, both promising a new constitution and electoral reform.Eduardo Robledo, the ruling party candidate and official winner of the Aug. 21 election, was inaugurated during a special legislative session yesterday at the modernistic City Theater with Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo in attendance.Amada Avendano, who claims the election was stolen from him by vote fraud, was installed yesterday at the main plaza several blocks away, where 3,000 protesters gathered in front of the statehouse to witness a Mayan ceremony of incense and chanting in the unrelenting sun.Both events were peaceful.
NEWS
December 29, 1997
GUNMEN who invaded the village of Acteal in southern Mexico and murdered 45 Tzotzil Indians last Monday, wounded the hopes for democracy and rule of law in Mexico. The reform administration of President Ernesto Zedillo is back to Square One in attempts to restore the credibility of Mexican institutions.There has been corruption of police and the army in fighting narco-terrorism, political murders at the highest level, stolen elections, a currency crisis impoverishing millions and now this.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2000
SAN PEDRO POLHO, Mexico - The 29-year-old farmer and father of four uses the battle name Santano. He has been a rebel in the Zapatista National Liberation Army since it declared war against the Mexican government nearly seven years ago, here in the south, in Chiapas state. And even though his world has moved a fraction closer to peace in the last couple of weeks, Santano sees no reason to let down his guard. He heard that the country's new president, Vicente Fox, had proclaimed a new dawn for the conflict-ravaged region.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2000
VENUSTIANO CARRANZA, Mexico --- Wherever Pablo Salazar takes his campaign for governor of Chiapas, Mexico's southernmost state, talk turns to blood and war and land. Peasants in this town of 25,000, for example, in the state's sugar-cane lowlands, have shed each other's blood in battles over tiny parcels of land. Their state is best known for an uprising by Indian peasants - the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, whose revolt began in 1994 and fractured Mexico's image as the land of "social peace."
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Science has only just discovered the Chiapas catfish, but the people of remote southern Mexico have known it for years - as dinner. Scientists at Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences recently declared the Mexican catfish not only a new species but the lone representative of an entirely new family of fish - one of only half a dozen new fish families identified over the last century. `Striking discovery' "It's a very striking discovery," said Richard Vari, a zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
By RICHARD BOUDREAUX and RICHARD BOUDREAUX,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- About a quarter of a million people chanting "Fraud! Fraud!" jammed Mexico City's central square yesterday to back leftist presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's bid to overturn his narrow electoral defeat with court appeals and mass marches. Lopez Obrador told the rowdy but nonviolent crowd that he would present allegations of fraudulent vote tallies to the Federal Electoral Tribunal before today's deadline and demand a recount. He called for nationwide marches that would converge on Mexico City for another rally next Sunday as the seven-judge panel weighed his appeal.
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Science has only just discovered the Chiapas catfish, but the people of remote southern Mexico have known it for years - as dinner. Scientists at Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences recently declared the Mexican catfish not only a new species but the lone representative of an entirely new family of fish - one of only half a dozen new fish families identified over the last century. `Striking discovery' "It's a very striking discovery," said Richard Vari, a zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2000
SAN PEDRO POLHO, Mexico - The 29-year-old farmer and father of four uses the battle name Santano. He has been a rebel in the Zapatista National Liberation Army since it declared war against the Mexican government nearly seven years ago, here in the south, in Chiapas state. And even though his world has moved a fraction closer to peace in the last couple of weeks, Santano sees no reason to let down his guard. He heard that the country's new president, Vicente Fox, had proclaimed a new dawn for the conflict-ravaged region.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2000
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, MEXICO - A strange thing happened not long ago when people in this mountain tourist town saw the renovations to their cathedral plaza taking shape. The townspeople protested publicly. The Chamber of Commerce wrote a letter to the mayor. Local architects went on radio station XEWM to complain. The lamps and benches were too modern, people complained. The scale of the project was too large for San Cristobal's quaint colonial downtown, they said. There weren't enough trees.
NEWS
August 26, 2000
ELECTION of Sen. Pablo Salazar as governor of Chiapas ends the Institutional Revolutionary Party's (PRI) 71-year stranglehold on Mexico's poor, backward, southern state. That's an aftershock to the earthquake July 2, when the conservative Vicente Fox won Mexico's presidency. Senator Salazar is a left-winger who enjoyed the backing of eight political parties demanding change. This should lead to a speedy accommodation with the Zapatista National Liberation Army, which launched a showy rebellion in Chiapas six years ago that festers still.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2000
VENUSTIANO CARRANZA, Mexico --- Wherever Pablo Salazar takes his campaign for governor of Chiapas, Mexico's southernmost state, talk turns to blood and war and land. Peasants in this town of 25,000, for example, in the state's sugar-cane lowlands, have shed each other's blood in battles over tiny parcels of land. Their state is best known for an uprising by Indian peasants - the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, whose revolt began in 1994 and fractured Mexico's image as the land of "social peace."
TOPIC
By RICK ROCKWELL | August 6, 2000
GOING INTO THE last military checkpoint of the day, a group of international human rights workers braced for another encounter with Mexico's army. The group was returning from a meeting with a community of Tzotzil Indians in the state of Chiapas, a zone filled with military checkpoints to hinder the movement of the Zapatista rebels. The rebels burst onto the Mexican scene Jan. 1, 1994, not coincidentally, the day the North American Free Trade Agreement treaty went into effect. The short, sharp hostilities that followed ruined the Mexican government's self-congratulations for steering the treaty to completion.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 5, 1994
Jack Kent Cooke for Marylander of the Year!Bill doesn't mind washing dirty laundry in public as long as it is an earlier generation's.A little revolution in Mexico doesn't bother us, if it stays in Chiapas.Into each life a little rain -- or sleet, snow, maybe hail? -- must fall.
TOPIC
By RICK ROCKWELL | August 6, 2000
GOING INTO THE last military checkpoint of the day, a group of international human rights workers braced for another encounter with Mexico's army. The group was returning from a meeting with a community of Tzotzil Indians in the state of Chiapas, a zone filled with military checkpoints to hinder the movement of the Zapatista rebels. The rebels burst onto the Mexican scene Jan. 1, 1994, not coincidentally, the day the North American Free Trade Agreement treaty went into effect. The short, sharp hostilities that followed ruined the Mexican government's self-congratulations for steering the treaty to completion.
NEWS
January 4, 2000
The Chiapas Partnership Project of the Howard County Friends of Latin America will sponsor a talk by a Baltimore attorney about her time as a volunteer human rights monitor in Chiapas, Mexico. The presentation will begin at 6: 30 p.m. Saturday in the Meeting House, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia. Information: 410-740-1231.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.