Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChiang Kai Shek
IN THE NEWS

Chiang Kai Shek

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 29, 1994
Taipei, Taiwan -- The Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman gave a concert here last night that would have made any orchestra proud.The symphony's performances of Dvorak's "Carnival Overture," Barber's Violin Concerto and Brahms' Symphony No. 1 drove a near-capacity audience in this city's magnificent Chiang Kai-shek Concert Hall wild with enthusiasm.The crowd demanded curtain call after curtain call, and received nTC three encores in exchange. It was only after the BSO players followed Zinman off the stage that the audience finally ceased cheering.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 2000
CHEN Shui-bian overthrew not the Communist Party of China in Taiwan's presidential election Saturday but the Nationalist Party on Taiwan. The ghost he vanquished was not that of Chairman Mao Tse-tung, who died in 1976, but of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, who died a year earlier. The voting turned not on relations with the mainland but on throwing Taiwan's own rascals out of power. If President Jiang Zemin of China has good intelligence -- and there is no reason to suppose otherwise -- he knows as well as Mr. Chen that this was no referendum on sovereignty.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 21, 2000
CHEN Shui-bian overthrew not the Communist Party of China in Taiwan's presidential election Saturday but the Nationalist Party on Taiwan. The ghost he vanquished was not that of Chairman Mao Tse-tung, who died in 1976, but of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, who died a year earlier. The voting turned not on relations with the mainland but on throwing Taiwan's own rascals out of power. If President Jiang Zemin of China has good intelligence -- and there is no reason to suppose otherwise -- he knows as well as Mr. Chen that this was no referendum on sovereignty.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt | March 16, 2000
TAIPEI - The "Taiwan Question" has stumped diplomats for decades and occasionally threatened to draw China and the United States into war. But David Chou, a self-styled visionary in red suspenders, thinks he has found the answer: Make Taiwan the 51st American state. The notion draws befuddled stares from many Taiwanese and would drive Beijing nuts. But Chou has thought it through and is dying to explain his idea to anyone who will listen. It's an ideal marriage, says the wiry 50-year-old, who brings a mix of evangelistic enthusiasm and impishness to his bold proposal.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
Joseph Heimbold Sr., 83, who is credited with creating Exxon's "tiger in the gas tank" marketing campaign, died Wednesday in Neptune, N.J.Keying on Exxon's tiger mascot, he cut a tiger tail from a stuffed animal, stuck it on his gas tank cover and drove to Exxon's corporate headquarters in the early 1960s.The company's vice president of marketing loved the idea and gave Mr. Heimbold the right to market tiger tails throughout the United States and Australia.In the 1970s, he created the annual New Jersey Tomato Weigh-In contest after he noticed that gardeners swapped tall tomato tales.
NEWS
September 24, 1997
Ernest J. Parham,93, whose testimony 71 years after a massacre of blacks in Rosewood, Fla., helped survivors collect compensation, died of a stroke Saturday in Orlando, Fla.Mr. Parham was a witness to five days of violence that wiped out the black community in northern Florida in 1923. As an 18-year-old, he stumbled across a white mob stringing a black man, Sam Carter, from a tree in an attempt to gain information about the alleged rape of a white woman.Someone in the mob shot and killed Mr. Carter, triggering the violence that destroyed the community of about 120 people.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 3, 1994
Paris. -- The United States enters the New Year with a justified confidence in the domestic prospect but no reason at all to believe that a good year is ahead in its international relations. The Somalian and Haitian fiascoes have been evidence of an administration ineptitude in foreign policy which its approach to the forthcoming NATO summit confirms.The Clinton administration refuses to contemplate the horrors of the Bosnian affair, resorting to the hypocrisy that leadership in the matter has been ceded to Western Europe.
NEWS
March 15, 1996
Officially, there is one China, with its capital in Bering. Officially, the island of Taiwan is a part of it. And if everyone genuinely believed those two things, the latest tensions between China and Taiwan would not exist.For China, Taiwan is a renegade province that must one day return to the motherland. On Taiwan, the government of President Lee Tenghui advocates eventual reunification with China -- but surely not on China's terms.The enmity is not new: It dates to a civil war that began nearly 70 years ago between Mao-Tse-tung's Communists and the Nationalists of Chiang Kai-shek.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt | March 16, 2000
TAIPEI - The "Taiwan Question" has stumped diplomats for decades and occasionally threatened to draw China and the United States into war. But David Chou, a self-styled visionary in red suspenders, thinks he has found the answer: Make Taiwan the 51st American state. The notion draws befuddled stares from many Taiwanese and would drive Beijing nuts. But Chou has thought it through and is dying to explain his idea to anyone who will listen. It's an ideal marriage, says the wiry 50-year-old, who brings a mix of evangelistic enthusiasm and impishness to his bold proposal.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 13, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- In a city dominated by a huge memorial to dictator Chiang Kai-shek, another symbol of this island's troubled past is nearing completion: a memorial to Chiang's victims, designed by a man who tried to assassinate Chiang's son.Such a turn of events would have been unimaginable a few years ago. The 1947 massacre of up to 20,000 indigenous Taiwanese here was a taboo subject. Perhaps even more than Taiwan's blooming democracy or its phenomenal economic wealth, the story of the "228" memorial and the failed assassin Cheng Tzu-tsai illustrates the rapid-fire changes taking place on this small island of 21 million off the coast of China.
NEWS
September 24, 1997
Ernest J. Parham,93, whose testimony 71 years after a massacre of blacks in Rosewood, Fla., helped survivors collect compensation, died of a stroke Saturday in Orlando, Fla.Mr. Parham was a witness to five days of violence that wiped out the black community in northern Florida in 1923. As an 18-year-old, he stumbled across a white mob stringing a black man, Sam Carter, from a tree in an attempt to gain information about the alleged rape of a white woman.Someone in the mob shot and killed Mr. Carter, triggering the violence that destroyed the community of about 120 people.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
Joseph Heimbold Sr., 83, who is credited with creating Exxon's "tiger in the gas tank" marketing campaign, died Wednesday in Neptune, N.J.Keying on Exxon's tiger mascot, he cut a tiger tail from a stuffed animal, stuck it on his gas tank cover and drove to Exxon's corporate headquarters in the early 1960s.The company's vice president of marketing loved the idea and gave Mr. Heimbold the right to market tiger tails throughout the United States and Australia.In the 1970s, he created the annual New Jersey Tomato Weigh-In contest after he noticed that gardeners swapped tall tomato tales.
NEWS
March 15, 1996
Officially, there is one China, with its capital in Bering. Officially, the island of Taiwan is a part of it. And if everyone genuinely believed those two things, the latest tensions between China and Taiwan would not exist.For China, Taiwan is a renegade province that must one day return to the motherland. On Taiwan, the government of President Lee Tenghui advocates eventual reunification with China -- but surely not on China's terms.The enmity is not new: It dates to a civil war that began nearly 70 years ago between Mao-Tse-tung's Communists and the Nationalists of Chiang Kai-shek.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 13, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- In a city dominated by a huge memorial to dictator Chiang Kai-shek, another symbol of this island's troubled past is nearing completion: a memorial to Chiang's victims, designed by a man who tried to assassinate Chiang's son.Such a turn of events would have been unimaginable a few years ago. The 1947 massacre of up to 20,000 indigenous Taiwanese here was a taboo subject. Perhaps even more than Taiwan's blooming democracy or its phenomenal economic wealth, the story of the "228" memorial and the failed assassin Cheng Tzu-tsai illustrates the rapid-fire changes taking place on this small island of 21 million off the coast of China.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 29, 1994
Taipei, Taiwan -- The Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman gave a concert here last night that would have made any orchestra proud.The symphony's performances of Dvorak's "Carnival Overture," Barber's Violin Concerto and Brahms' Symphony No. 1 drove a near-capacity audience in this city's magnificent Chiang Kai-shek Concert Hall wild with enthusiasm.The crowd demanded curtain call after curtain call, and received nTC three encores in exchange. It was only after the BSO players followed Zinman off the stage that the audience finally ceased cheering.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 3, 1994
Paris. -- The United States enters the New Year with a justified confidence in the domestic prospect but no reason at all to believe that a good year is ahead in its international relations. The Somalian and Haitian fiascoes have been evidence of an administration ineptitude in foreign policy which its approach to the forthcoming NATO summit confirms.The Clinton administration refuses to contemplate the horrors of the Bosnian affair, resorting to the hypocrisy that leadership in the matter has been ceded to Western Europe.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 9, 1992
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- Like a compulsive overachiever who impresses everybody but himself, Taiwan has enjoyed stunning successes in recent years but is gripped by an identity crisis.Despite having engineered an economic rise that makes Japan look like a slowpoke, and despite having introduced free speech and free elections, Taiwan still seems full of anxiety about itself and uncertainty about what it is.Until five years ago, when four decades of martial law gave way to a sometimes tempestuous political free-for-all, the answer was clear: Taiwan was an inseparable part of China.
NEWS
September 26, 1995
Diana Chin Hsu, a journalist, best-selling author and the widow of Chiang Kai-shek's secret police chief, died Wednesday of stomach cancer at her home in New York. She was 77.Ms. Hsu covered Japan's war against China during World War II, then escaped to Taiwan with the youngest three of her eight children shortly after Mao Tse-tung's Communist takeover.Her husband, Mo Tze Shin, was executed by the Communists in 1951, and Ms. Hsu's book, "Mao Tse-tung Killed My Husband," was a best seller in Asia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 9, 1992
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- Like a compulsive overachiever who impresses everybody but himself, Taiwan has enjoyed stunning successes in recent years but is gripped by an identity crisis.Despite having engineered an economic rise that makes Japan look like a slowpoke, and despite having introduced free speech and free elections, Taiwan still seems full of anxiety about itself and uncertainty about what it is.Until five years ago, when four decades of martial law gave way to a sometimes tempestuous political free-for-all, the answer was clear: Taiwan was an inseparable part of China.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.