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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
The 40th anniversary of Chez Panisse in Berkeley hasn't passed without notice. Here's a nice, long piece from Sunday's San Francisco Chronicle.  I've never been but features colleague Michael Sragow has -- he was teaching a Berkeley graduate journalism course on writing on film. He just told me that Chez Panisse was one of the few things that entirely lived up to its reputation. " Baltimore photographer and Zagat editor Marty Katz told me that when he showed up at Chez Panisse in between the breakfast and lunch sevice the staff took pity on him and brought out fresh muffins for him. And here are pictures and coverage from Friday night's anniversary party at the Berkeley Museum of Art (Eater SF)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
The 40th anniversary of Chez Panisse in Berkeley hasn't passed without notice. Here's a nice, long piece from Sunday's San Francisco Chronicle.  I've never been but features colleague Michael Sragow has -- he was teaching a Berkeley graduate journalism course on writing on film. He just told me that Chez Panisse was one of the few things that entirely lived up to its reputation. " Baltimore photographer and Zagat editor Marty Katz told me that when he showed up at Chez Panisse in between the breakfast and lunch sevice the staff took pity on him and brought out fresh muffins for him. And here are pictures and coverage from Friday night's anniversary party at the Berkeley Museum of Art (Eater SF)
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NEWS
By James Temple and James Temple,Contra Costa Times | October 8, 2006
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. -- One summer night in the early 1980s, Alice Waters, the iconic founder of Chez Panisse, asked her head chef to prepare anchovies just trawled from Monterey Bay, Calif. Filleting and grilling nearly 1,000 tiny fish in a three-hour period struck Paul Bertolli as impossible, but Waters wanted the food served at its freshest. He scrambled to fill more than 100 orders. Bertolli, who had become head chef about a year earlier, learned quickly that adaptability was a critical skill at Chez Panisse.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
The Art of Simple Food By Alice Waters Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $35 If it weren't for Alice Waters, would "organic" be a household word? Would restaurants be boasting about their locally caught salmon, their heirloom tomatoes, their artisan cheese? Waters, the chef behind Berkeley, Calif.'s Chez Panisse, is credited with launching what has become a national awareness about where food comes from and how it's grown. With The Art of Simple Food, Waters has created not so much a cookbook as an introduction to her philosophy of food, a clinic in what she considers to be "the underlying principles of good cooking."
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | September 11, 1995
New Orleans. -- The faster you travel the more compressed the info you get. If you're in the California Bay area for a few minutes, for instance, you may hear that, ''Chez Panisse now charges for reservations.'' Chez Panisse is a famous restaurant and, later, when you deconstruct this, you understand that the fact that Chez Panisse charges for reservations signals a whole new thing, some of which is a new thing about restaurants -- I mean, who ever heard of a restaurant charging for reservations?
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
NEWS
By AMY SCATTERGOOD and AMY SCATTERGOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2006
Alchemists have tried for centuries to transform base metals into gold - unsuccessfully, at least as far as we know. But it's a lovely concept: Take the common and uninspiring - lead, copper, prunes - and change it into something glorious. Prunes? Though dried fruit can be tasty right out of the box - the lunchbox anyway - it's even better with a little transformation. But you don't need medieval textbooks to do it; all you need is a well-stocked pantry or, even better, a good liquor cabinet.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Grapefruit was first identified in Barbados and grows in clusters, like grapes. Some say this accounts for the name. But that's not conclusive. "Fruit experts disagree about the origins of grapefruit, how it was named and even what species it is. But there is little debate about how delicious it is," Alice Waters says in Chez Panisse Fruit. This low-calorie fruit (about 40 calories in a medium half) is high in vitamin C and potassium. Donna Pierce writes for the Chicago Tribune. Grapefruit Tips BUYING Select fruit with thin, smooth skin.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
The Art of Simple Food By Alice Waters Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $35 If it weren't for Alice Waters, would "organic" be a household word? Would restaurants be boasting about their locally caught salmon, their heirloom tomatoes, their artisan cheese? Waters, the chef behind Berkeley, Calif.'s Chez Panisse, is credited with launching what has become a national awareness about where food comes from and how it's grown. With The Art of Simple Food, Waters has created not so much a cookbook as an introduction to her philosophy of food, a clinic in what she considers to be "the underlying principles of good cooking."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 11, 1995
I was frying flowers. That's right, flowers, blossoms of summer squash, stuffed with fontina cheese and garlic, were crackling in the frying pan.As the stuffed flowers moved around in the hot oil, I thought they looked like little footballs. Both the frying flowers and flying footballs were brown and wobbly. My imagery was probably influenced by the fact that, like many American males, I have been spending a lot of time lately either tossing a football around or watching other guys toss it.For example, just before I fried the flowers, I had spent part of the afternoon watching one of my kids play in a football game between two middle schools, a real game as the kids would say, one with uniforms and referees.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Grapefruit was first identified in Barbados and grows in clusters, like grapes. Some say this accounts for the name. But that's not conclusive. "Fruit experts disagree about the origins of grapefruit, how it was named and even what species it is. But there is little debate about how delicious it is," Alice Waters says in Chez Panisse Fruit. This low-calorie fruit (about 40 calories in a medium half) is high in vitamin C and potassium. Donna Pierce writes for the Chicago Tribune. Grapefruit Tips BUYING Select fruit with thin, smooth skin.
NEWS
By James Temple and James Temple,Contra Costa Times | October 8, 2006
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. -- One summer night in the early 1980s, Alice Waters, the iconic founder of Chez Panisse, asked her head chef to prepare anchovies just trawled from Monterey Bay, Calif. Filleting and grilling nearly 1,000 tiny fish in a three-hour period struck Paul Bertolli as impossible, but Waters wanted the food served at its freshest. He scrambled to fill more than 100 orders. Bertolli, who had become head chef about a year earlier, learned quickly that adaptability was a critical skill at Chez Panisse.
NEWS
By AMY SCATTERGOOD and AMY SCATTERGOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2006
Alchemists have tried for centuries to transform base metals into gold - unsuccessfully, at least as far as we know. But it's a lovely concept: Take the common and uninspiring - lead, copper, prunes - and change it into something glorious. Prunes? Though dried fruit can be tasty right out of the box - the lunchbox anyway - it's even better with a little transformation. But you don't need medieval textbooks to do it; all you need is a well-stocked pantry or, even better, a good liquor cabinet.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | July 14, 2004
Send tasteful notes to friends with the new Chez Panisse Fruit Notecards. The stationery features recipes from Alice Waters, founder of the renowned Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., and illustrations by artist Patricia Curtan. The notecards come 12 to a box and feature six designs and six recipes, including directions for making mango salsa, dried persimmons, pistachio-stuffed nectarines, strawberry sherbet, raspberry coulis and butternut squash and pear puree. Look for them in bookstores and among online booksellers.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 11, 1995
I was frying flowers. That's right, flowers, blossoms of summer squash, stuffed with fontina cheese and garlic, were crackling in the frying pan.As the stuffed flowers moved around in the hot oil, I thought they looked like little footballs. Both the frying flowers and flying footballs were brown and wobbly. My imagery was probably influenced by the fact that, like many American males, I have been spending a lot of time lately either tossing a football around or watching other guys toss it.For example, just before I fried the flowers, I had spent part of the afternoon watching one of my kids play in a football game between two middle schools, a real game as the kids would say, one with uniforms and referees.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | July 14, 2004
Send tasteful notes to friends with the new Chez Panisse Fruit Notecards. The stationery features recipes from Alice Waters, founder of the renowned Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., and illustrations by artist Patricia Curtan. The notecards come 12 to a box and feature six designs and six recipes, including directions for making mango salsa, dried persimmons, pistachio-stuffed nectarines, strawberry sherbet, raspberry coulis and butternut squash and pear puree. Look for them in bookstores and among online booksellers.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 1995
There are few foods that inspire poetry at my family's supper table. Cauliflower was one. When I was kid growing up in the Midwest, as soon as my dad saw a bowl of cauliflower he would recite a poem in its honor.The poem went something like "See the little cauliflower, growing sweeter by the hour."As he recited the verses my dad would push a bowl of steaming cauliflower in front of me and and my three brothers. We would recoil. Cauliflower was a vegetable and, therefore, not to be trusted.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | September 11, 1995
New Orleans. -- The faster you travel the more compressed the info you get. If you're in the California Bay area for a few minutes, for instance, you may hear that, ''Chez Panisse now charges for reservations.'' Chez Panisse is a famous restaurant and, later, when you deconstruct this, you understand that the fact that Chez Panisse charges for reservations signals a whole new thing, some of which is a new thing about restaurants -- I mean, who ever heard of a restaurant charging for reservations?
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 1995
There are few foods that inspire poetry at my family's supper table. Cauliflower was one. When I was kid growing up in the Midwest, as soon as my dad saw a bowl of cauliflower he would recite a poem in its honor.The poem went something like "See the little cauliflower, growing sweeter by the hour."As he recited the verses my dad would push a bowl of steaming cauliflower in front of me and and my three brothers. We would recoil. Cauliflower was a vegetable and, therefore, not to be trusted.
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