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Chewing Gum

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NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 29, 1990
Bent over his desk, 16-year-old Chris Biondi carefully details the exact outlines of the Broadneck High seal.His artwork will decorate the final page of a scrapbook being mailed -- along with a tape of a student radio broadcast on WNAV-AM Annapolis -- to military troops in the Middle East for Christmas.He pauses for a second to ponder the loneliness associated with military service."It could be me in two years if this continues," Chris said. "I'd like to know that I wasn't being taken for granted."
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NEWS
July 24, 2013
House Speaker John Boehner was quoted in Monday's paper as saying that fixing the nation's fiscal problems, not its immigration laws, is his top priority. Do we pay him to work on only one problem at a time? If so, is there anyone else in the U.S. House of Representatives who can multi-task for us? Doreen Rosenthal, Baltimore
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FEATURES
By Andrea Higbie and Andrea Higbie,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 3, 1998
NEW YORK -- It was a fairy-tale wedding. The sky was a glorious, sunny blue. Everything, from the radiant bride to the fabulous flowers, was perfect. Everything, that is, except the bridesmaid chomping away on a wad of gum."I was appalled," said Letitia Baldrige, the etiquette expert, who was a guest. "It was so incredibly rude. But the sad thing is that it was not shocking: all of a sudden gum chewing in public is so prevalent that it has become acceptable."Openly, brazenly, people are chewing gum. At work, gyms, restaurants and clubs, gum has become the big cigar of the season.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
To get beyond all the spin from both sides about the state budget, take a quick look at Appendix F in the back of the budget highlights book Gov. Martin O'Malley released Tuesday. That's where you find the state's general fund summary and a forecast of what is likely to happen to Maryland's finances over the next five years. It is the Rosetta Stone of state budgets. Here's what it says this year: Governor O'Malley's spending plan would, if all goes according to plan, leave $274 million in the state's bank account at the end of fiscal 2011.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev and Ameet Sachdev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2003
Two years ago, an investor in Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. stood up at the company's annual meeting and asked a favor of Chairman William "Bill" Wrigley Jr. "My one request is, that being older now, that should you develop a Viagra-flavored health care product, I would like to be among the first to know," the man said. The audience roared with laughter. Wrigley smiled. "I think," he replied, "the possibilities are endless." The chairman wasn't kidding. A few months before that meeting, the Chicago company had quietly filed a patent for just such a product: a chewing gum that treats impotency.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | July 21, 2006
Is chewing gum good for you? The sugarless kind is, at least as far as your teeth are concerned. Chewing gum, either sugar-free or sugary, "causes us to salivate, and saliva has tremendously beneficial effects," said Dr. Matthew Messina a dentist in Cleveland who is a consumer adviser for the American Dental Association. Saliva "is a buffering solution. It washes the teeth." Sugary chewing gum is not a good idea, though. Sugar causes bacteria in the mouth to secrete acid, which dissolves tooth enamel, causing cavities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 7, 1999
Here is what Karen Hartman says when people ask what her play "Gum" is about: "I usually say it's about a fictional country where there's a ban on gum and one sister has chewed the gum and is a fallen woman, and the other sister wants to know what's so exciting about the gum, and that's where it begins."Where the play goes from there will no doubt surprise many audience members. It even surprised the playwright. "I was halfway through a play about female genital mutilation when I realized that was the play I was writing," Hartman says.
NEWS
October 23, 1998
Karl E. Prindle,95, who developed moisture-proof cellophane and a type of tape used on packages of chewing gum and cigarettes, died recently in Cleveland.He was 24 when he developed moisture-proof cellophane for DuPont in the mid-1920s. He also developed Lurex, a nontarnish metallic thread used in fabric, and zip tape, the cellophane strip used in chewing gum and cigarette packages.Pub Date: 10/23/98
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | November 16, 2008
A.J. Burnett is the most infuriating pitcher in all of baseball. Instead of offering him a dump truck full of money (whether it's real money or Confederate money, as Syd Thrift might say), the Orioles should run far, far away. Because he will break your heart. He will make your hair fall out. He will spend five years teasing you with one good start in every four, and spend more time on the DL than Amy Winehouse spends in detox. ... Burnett has an electric arm that is made out of balsa wood and held together with chewing gum. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
NEWS
February 8, 1993
Weekend gunman robs Severna Park gas stationA handgun-wielding robber got away with an undetermined amount of money from a Severna Park gas station early Saturday morning.Police said the man first asked the attendant of the Severna Park Shell station if he could use the bathroom, but was told the door could not be unlocked at 3 a.m.The man then asked for chewing gum. After getting some, the clerk said he turned to see the man holding a gun through the glass and demanding money.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
Taking a bite out of the bed-bug problem With bed-bug infestations on the rise across the country, the Baltimore City Health Department has begun a campaign to increase awareness of the problem. The department's Healthy Homes Division began conducting bedbug inspections in December and has been working with the city Housing Authority to respond to complaints and minimize infestations, says Assistant Health Commissioner Madeleine Shea. Shea says the city's 311 nonemergency number last year received 26 times more calls for bed-bug problems that it did four years ago. To help combat the problem, the city has developed brochures and public service announcements and met with school health officials, In June, health workers will be conducting a door-to-door campaign to educate residents about the problem.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | November 16, 2008
A.J. Burnett is the most infuriating pitcher in all of baseball. Instead of offering him a dump truck full of money (whether it's real money or Confederate money, as Syd Thrift might say), the Orioles should run far, far away. Because he will break your heart. He will make your hair fall out. He will spend five years teasing you with one good start in every four, and spend more time on the DL than Amy Winehouse spends in detox. ... Burnett has an electric arm that is made out of balsa wood and held together with chewing gum. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
NEWS
January 7, 2008
Huckabee, Obama haven't won yet I saw The Sun's huge headline on Friday: "Huckabee, Obama win" (Jan. 4). Of course, all they won was the Iowa caucuses, but you'd think they were the only two choices left for president next fall. It is high time that this country had a nationally mandated single day for primaries and caucuses for all states. I have nothing specific against the people of Iowa. But there is no reason that perfectly good candidates for office should have to give up if they somehow fail to excite the people of Iowa and New Hampshire.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | June 22, 2007
Oh, Andy MacPhail, your words melt in our ears like ice cream on a summer sidewalk. You signed on this week to save the Orioles and instantly you cooed: "At the end of the day, the fans are the boss. They have the ultimate power. Something we all have to keep in mind, whether we're players or running baseball operations, they're customers and you have to treat them that way." You had 'em at hello, Andy. We all know you're busy scouring the country right now to find the right manager, and the guess here is that Joe Girardi's rejection hurt at least a little.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | July 21, 2006
Is chewing gum good for you? The sugarless kind is, at least as far as your teeth are concerned. Chewing gum, either sugar-free or sugary, "causes us to salivate, and saliva has tremendously beneficial effects," said Dr. Matthew Messina a dentist in Cleveland who is a consumer adviser for the American Dental Association. Saliva "is a buffering solution. It washes the teeth." Sugary chewing gum is not a good idea, though. Sugar causes bacteria in the mouth to secrete acid, which dissolves tooth enamel, causing cavities.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 9, 2004
I read that cinnamon is good against plaque. Can you tell me how to take it? Research funded by the Wrigley Company has found that chewing cinnamon gum can kill bacteria in the mouth that cause bad breath. There is no indication, however, that these bacteria are also involved in the tooth plaque that causes tooth decay. Gum that contains the natural sugar substitute xylitol (Aquafresh Dental Gum, Carefree Koolerz, Spry, Stimorol, etc.) can reduce mouth bacteria that cause plaque and cavities.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
Good news for smokers, ear poppers and those worried about blowing bad breath on fellow airline passengers: Baltimore-Washington International Airport is easing its restrictions on chewing gum sales.For 15 years, you couldn't buy the stuff there. Officials don't like the way it -- well, gums up the carpet."Sometimes you can't get it out," said janitor Donald Pressley, who does the best he can with a freeze-type spray and a spatula.Complaints from smokers faced with smoking restrictions have prompted BWI to relent.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
Taking a bite out of the bed-bug problem With bed-bug infestations on the rise across the country, the Baltimore City Health Department has begun a campaign to increase awareness of the problem. The department's Healthy Homes Division began conducting bedbug inspections in December and has been working with the city Housing Authority to respond to complaints and minimize infestations, says Assistant Health Commissioner Madeleine Shea. Shea says the city's 311 nonemergency number last year received 26 times more calls for bed-bug problems that it did four years ago. To help combat the problem, the city has developed brochures and public service announcements and met with school health officials, In June, health workers will be conducting a door-to-door campaign to educate residents about the problem.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
A lawyer representing mentally disabled Rosewood Center residents who have been accused of serious crimes sued Maryland health department officials yesterday, saying her clients are entitled to individual hearings before the state moves them to a maximum-security facility. In papers filed in Howard County Circuit Court, lawyer Ria P. Rochvarg says the state must convince an administrative law judge in each case that a transfer to the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup is necessary.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev and Ameet Sachdev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2003
Two years ago, an investor in Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. stood up at the company's annual meeting and asked a favor of Chairman William "Bill" Wrigley Jr. "My one request is, that being older now, that should you develop a Viagra-flavored health care product, I would like to be among the first to know," the man said. The audience roared with laughter. Wrigley smiled. "I think," he replied, "the possibilities are endless." The chairman wasn't kidding. A few months before that meeting, the Chicago company had quietly filed a patent for just such a product: a chewing gum that treats impotency.
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