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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
By all accounts, Frank and Wendy Bunch's farm in Kent County would be an appropriate — and historically correct — setting for any film or documentary on America's Colonial past. One would only need to replace the couple's late-model cars with carriages along the private road that enters onto a breathtakingly long driveway lined with 134 cedar trees. The banks of a large pond in the front yard are occupied by metal herons that appear to be alive and waddling ducks that, on closer inspection, are. A brick Colonial, built in 1781, the home sits on 78 acres of flat and verdant pasture and is a National Trust historic property.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Vito "Doc" Tinelli Jr., a longtime Chestertown pharmacist, died May 23 of an acute coronary embolism at the Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. He was 77. The son of a Bethlehem Steel Corp. steelworker and a homemaker, Mr. Tinelli was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk, where he graduated in 1952 from Dundalk High School. He attended Kansas State University and earned his pharmacy degree in 1960 from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. After graduating from Maryland, Mr. Tinelli moved to Chestertown, where he joined his brother-in-law, Alphonse Poklis, also a druggist, at the Chestertown Pharmacy.
TRAVEL
May 12, 2011
Chestertown Tea Party Festival What: The Eastern Shore once again plays host to the Chestertown Tea Party Festival — an event not to be confused with any political affiliation. "In an era that has seen so many radical tea party political movements, the historic pageant in the tiny hamlet stands apart as a genuine slice of Americana, whose only aspiration is to remind its community of its storied past and celebrate being good neighbors," wrote organizers of the annual celebration that began in 1975.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 20, 2010
Edward Paul Martuszewski, a retired machinist and former Curtis Bay resident, died Tuesday of cancer at his Chestertown home. He was 83. Mr. Martuszewski, the son of a Davidson Chemical Co. worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore, one of 15 children, and raised in Curtis Bay. Mr. Martuszewski attended Baltimore public schools. He enlisted in the Army in 1947 and served in both Japan and Korea, where he was decorated with a Bronze Star. After being discharged in 1952, Mr. Martuszewski returned to Curtis Bay and went to work as a machinist for Harbison Walker Refactories, a fire brick manufacturer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
Irma P. Middleton, a retired Eastern Shore banker, died Sunday in her sleep at Chester River Manor, a Chestertown assisted-living facility. She was 97. Irma Price was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1931 from Eastern High School. She was married in 1932 to Willard Howard Middleton, a machinist, and the couple lived in Baltimore until moving to Chestertown in 1948. During the 1940s, Mrs. Middleton was employed at Wyman's Shoes in Baltimore. In 1948, she began her banking career as a teller at The Peoples Bank in Chestertown.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
T allulah's back, and she's as bawdy as ever. Well, sort of. For the past 42 years, the real Tallulah Bankhead, who will forever be remembered for her baritone-laced husky pronunciation of the word "Daaaaaahling," has been sleeping away the ages in a quiet corner of a Chestertown churchyard, perhaps sipping celestial bourbons and smoking cigarettes while dressed in her trademark full-length fur coat. Last week, she stepped back onto Broadway, courtesy of actress Valerie Harper in "Looped."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik , david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Maryland Public Television launches a new documentary series this week titled "Our Town." And while it's based on a simple premise, it's loaded with rich possibilities for alternative ways of storytelling and the use of new technology to empower citizens to define themselves to some extent for TV and online audiences. "Unlike a lot of historical documentaries seen on television," MPT says in a statement of purpose, "the 'Our Town' series will explore different Maryland communities through the eyes (and camera lenses)
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