Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChestertown
IN THE NEWS

Chestertown

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
A 37-year-old Chestertown man working on a water line on Ft. Smallwood Road in Baltimore was seriously injured when a tractor trailer crashed into his parked pickup truck and pushed it on top of him Monday afternoon, Anne Arundel County police said. The victim, John Scott Ford, was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma in serious but stable condition after the crash around 12:15 p.m. The driver of the Baystate Pools tractor trailer, Christopher Clark Rabel, 42, of Baltimore, didn't see the arrow board latched to the back of Ford's Chevrolet pickup, police said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Will Fesperman and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Washington College in Chestertown has named Jack Griswold, an investment executive, as the interim president of the college, according to a press release issued Monday. Griswold - an emeritus member and former chair of the college's board of visitors and governors - will replace current President Mitchell B. Reiss and serve until the school hires a new president. Reiss is leaving Chestertown to become the president and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg foundation in Virginia. Griswold, a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, works at Black Oak Associates, a property development and investment management company in Owings Mills.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
A Chestertown man pleaded guilty this week in a New York federal court to trafficking live snapping turtles that he processed in Queen Anne's County and then sold as turtle meat. Michael V. Johnson, 57, faces a maximum of one year in prison for turning the wildlife into food at his business in Millington called Turtle Deluxe Inc., according to a statement from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of New York in Buffalo. During 2007 and 2008, the statement said, Johnson purchased common snapping turtles — considered protected wildlife under New York law — from sellers in several states, brought them back to the Turtle Deluxe facility to sort and weigh and then paid the vendors based on weight.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
A 37-year-old Chestertown man working on a water line on Ft. Smallwood Road in Baltimore was seriously injured when a tractor trailer crashed into his parked pickup truck and pushed it on top of him Monday afternoon, Anne Arundel County police said. The victim, John Scott Ford, was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma in serious but stable condition after the crash around 12:15 p.m. The driver of the Baystate Pools tractor trailer, Christopher Clark Rabel, 42, of Baltimore, didn't see the arrow board latched to the back of Ford's Chevrolet pickup, police said.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
Jeanette Rose Fox, who operated a Chestertown five-and-dime store with her husband for 40 years, died Sunday of heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 97.The daughter of immigrant parents who came to Baltimore from Latvia in the 1880s, she was reared on Pennsylvania Avenue, where her father was a tailor to the Baltimore Police Department. Leaving school after the sixth grade, she went to work for Polan Katz & Co., manufacturers of umbrellas.While working there, she met and married Baurice Fox in 1913 at age 16. After pursuing various business opportunities in Western Maryland, the couple moved to Chestertown in 1928 and opened their first store on Cross Street and later moved to High Street.
NEWS
By Michael Holden RTC | May 14, 1993
IS Chestertown about to become Everywhere, USA?The Kent County Planning Commission Tuesday gave preliminary approval for a 93,000-square-foot Wal-Mart to be located just outside the limits of the historic town. In March, two of the three county commissioners also approved the store plans preliminarily.With these votes, Kent County took a gigantic step toward the sameness, the bigness and the ugliness that have turned so many other parts of America into suburban wastelands whose highest aesthetic expression is the indoor mall.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | September 15, 1991
George Washington slept there. And, his diary reveals, he ate there, too.But once upon a time, none of this seemed to matter. Fifty years ago the stately home now known as the Hynson-Ringgold House, one of the oldest and loveliest of Chestertown's 18th century buildings, was overgrown, deteriorating rapidly and, quite frankly, spooky."
NEWS
October 29, 2003
Dorothy W. Myers, a retired bookkeeper and lifelong Chestertown resident, died of pneumonia Friday at Chester River Hospital Center. She was 100. Born Dorothy Woodall in Chestertown, she was the daughter of Washington Irving Woodall, a well-known Tolchester Line steamboat captain. She was a graduate of Chestertown High School and earned her bachelor's degree in 1924 from Washington College. She was a bookkeeper at Chestertown Bank of Maryland for 40 years before retiring in 1967. Mrs. Myers was a member of Christ United Methodist Church, where she sang with the choir for many years.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | August 31, 1992
CHESTERTOWN -- Mary Emerson gazed across High Street at the charred skeleton of McCrory's yesterday and remembered a loyal customer: herself, a half-century or so ago."On Saturday nights, we country people came to town to do our shopping. We kids would each get a quarter -- 15 cents for a movie, and after the movie I'd bring the 10 cents over here and get some penny candy," said Mrs. Emerson, 64."It's sad to see. Every town needs a five-and-dime."Nearby, a more recent customer, Peter Heller, 8, leaned on his bike and stared into the same sooty ruins, where three cash registers sat melted on the sidewalk.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 25, 2003
Police are investigating the suspicious death of a 44-year-old Eastern Shore man whose body was found in his car outside a Jessup motel Tuesday night. Howard County police said yesterday that there was no obvious cause of death for Eugene Paul McAllister of Chestertown, who was found about 7:30 p.m. in his Toyota Corolla parked at the Greenway Motel in the 7700 block of Washington Blvd. McAllister's family reported him missing to authorities on the Eastern Shore on Dec. 19, one day after he reportedly dropped off a relative at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Hazel E. Milash, a homemaker and former longtime Brooklyn Park resident, died Sunday of heart failure at Chester River Manor, a Chestertown assisted-living facility. She was 92. The former Hazel Elizabeth Johns was born in Charleston, S.C., and was a teenager when she moved with her family to Baltimore. She was a 1940 graduate of Southern High School. During World War II, she worked in the credit department of Shavitz Furniture Store. She met her future husband, Paul A. Milash, who was home on leave from the Navy.
FEATURES
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Jamal Cannady of Sharptown reflects on his time at summer camp, his voice warms with the onrush of happy memories and enthusiasm. Ziplining, swimming, boating — he does it all. "Things I never did before in life I get to do at camp. I like to go out on a canoe ride, go in the pool, go camping, go on a nature walk, sing songs and we do a lot of things in the woods," he said. Cannady, 32, has cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair. Since he was 2, he has spent part of his summer at Easter Seals' Camp Fairlee, a camp established to give children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities the opportunity to experience everything offered at a typical summer camp.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Washington College announced five finalists Friday, including two from the Baltimore area, for its annual Sophie Kerr Prize. The nation's largest undergraduate literary award is worth $62,900 this year. The private liberal arts college in Chestertown annually bestows the prize on the graduating senior who is judged to show the most literary talent and promise. Members of the school's English faculty selected five finalists from portfolios submitted by 32 students. The prize is named for Sophie Kerr, a native of Denton in Caroline County who became a published fiction writer and national magazine editor in New York.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
As a Maryland citizen who enjoys the autumn sailing season best of all, I thought people should consider that the hunting season affects those of us navigating the tributaries of the Chesapeake as well ("Blue laws fade, Sunday hunt proceeds," April 8). Hunting blinds are all along the Eastern Shore waterways, and if the ban on Sunday hunting is lifted it will mean that my peaceful sailing days in the fall are over. Virginia Kerr, Chestertown - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Picture a Victorian mansion in move-in condition that could function as a bed-and-breakfast, a home for a growing family, or just a place for anyone hankering for a bygone time. This 19th-century home at 114 Washington Ave. in Chestertown on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay fits the bill. "What I like best about the house is the enthusiasm with which the owners researched [the home's history] and tried to restore it as authentically as they could," said Terry Stafford, an agent with Keller Williams American Premier Realty LLC and the listing agent for the property, which is priced at $675,000.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Chestertown officials have been interested in energy conservation for a long time - they started tracking usage levels during the 1970s energy crisis. Even so, when the Eastern Shore town launched a project to cut back on electricity costs seven years ago, the municipality cut usage by 11 percent and sliced more than $130,000 in annual expenses. Now local leaders are hoping to expand on that success. They've launched the ShorePower Project with four other communities - Cambridge, Easton, Salisbury and Snow Hill - to help leaders in those places find ways to use energy more efficiently and with less impact on the environment.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 14, 1993
Cambridge. -- Towns, like people, occasionally go through crises that change them forever. Two very different communities on the Eastern Shore, Cambridge and Chestertown, are reminders of that. Let's consider this one first.Cambridge isn't what it used to be, and thank heaven for that. Its notoriety has faded. Today it deals with the daily muddle of municipal life much as other towns do, and stays safely out of the news. It isn't perfect, but it's doing all right.Yet we're all prisoners of our experience, and so for those of us who don't live here but still remember the bad times in Cambridge, this place will always be full of ghosts.
NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2009
Bob and Susan Lathroum had always dreamed of owning and operating a bed-and-breakfast. So 11 years ago, when Bob lost his third management job in 15 years, the couple decided the time was right to pursue that dream. The quest led them from Linthicum to Chestertown on the Eastern Shore. "The second time I crossed the bridge over the Chester River, I said, 'This is home,' " Susan Lathroum recalled of the historic little town. The Lathroums purchased the Widow's Walk Inn in 1997. Covered in yellow clapboard siding and trimmed with deep red shutters, the stately Victorian was built in 1877 and is listed in Chestertown's historic registry.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Dr. Thomas Russell Hendrix, a leader in the fields of gastric and liver disease, died of complications from heart surgery Dec. 23 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 93 and lived in Roland Park before moving to Chestertown. Dr. Hendrix, who pioneered studies in gluten intolerance, swallowing disorders and diarrheal disease, led his department at Hopkins for 31 years. "He had patients from all over the world," said his son, Paul Hendrix, also of Chestertown. "He was the gastroenterologist of last resort.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
W. Robert "Bob" Fallaw Jr., a retired Washington College history professor, died of multiple myeloma complications Dec. 13 at the Hospice Center of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 78. Born in Durham, N.C., he was the son of Walter Robert Fallaw Sr., a salesman and farmer, and Amy Wilson Childs Fallaw, a high school teacher. He earned a history degree from Duke University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He also had a master's degree and a doctorate from Princeton University.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.