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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2005
Four years ago, in what was hailed then as the largest land preservation deal in Maryland history, officials paid $8 million to the owner of Chino Farms in Queen Anne's County to ensure that its 5,000 acres along the Chester River would remain home to bald eagles, endangered squirrels and thousands of ducks and geese. Now, 114 suburban homes are planned on a neighboring farm, and more may be on the way for Chino's other borders. The situation, playing out now before the county's planning commission, highlights the growing challenges of preserving farming in Maryland as suburbia spreads across the state.
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NEWS
November 2, 2004
On Monday, November 1, 2004, WILLIAM H. "Huggy Bear" NORRIS, JR., of Chestertown, MD, died in the Chester River Hospital Center, Chestertown, MD. He was 78. Mr. Norris was born in Baltimore, MD, the son of the late William H. Norris, Sr. and George Slingluff Norris. Mr. Norris was a self employed Real Estate Broker, Owning the William Norris Real Estate Agency for many years. Mr. Norris was a WWII Marine Corps Veteran. Mr. Norris was a member and Past Commodore of the Chester River yacht and Country Club, Chestertown, MD, where he enjoyed playing golf, with his many friends and participating in the MISGA, golf outings throughout the eastern shore.
NEWS
October 26, 2004
A Washington man was presumed dead yesterday after he fell from a boat in the Chester River early Sunday morning, police said. About 3:20 a.m., John Eric Gaither, 41, fell into the water near the Castle Marina in Queen Anne's County, said Cpl. Ken Turner, a spokesman for the Maryland Natural Resources Police. Turner said firefighters, Department of Natural Resources officers, state police and members of the Coast Guard searched for Gaither for about 12 hours before turning their mission into a recovery operation.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
CENTREVILLE - An aging sewage treatment plant with a malfunctioning pump may have dumped more than 1 million gallons of raw sewage into a tributary of the Chester River last year, according to documents released by a town worker who says he was fired for revealing the problem. State officials were never told of the apparent spills, an omission that has prompted a criminal investigation by the state attorney general's office, as well as a review by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
August 10, 2003
Ann Athey Barroll, a homemaker and volunteer, died of cancer Tuesday at Magnolia Hall Nursing Home in Chestertown. She was 66. Born Ann Athey in Baltimore, she grew up on Longwood Road, a short walk from the Roland Park Country School, from which she graduated in 1955. She attended Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va. In 1962, she married David Oakley Vanderpoel Barroll, a real estate broker, and the couple moved to Chestertown. Mrs. Barroll belonged to the Chestertown Garden Club and was a member of Emmanuel Episcopal Church.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
William T. Beever, former owner of The Bake Shop in Glen Burnie, died of a respiratory illness Thursday at Easton Memorial Hospital. He was 77 and lived at Chester River Beach in Grasonville. Mr. Beever was born in Baltimore, where he spent part of his youth. He was a graduate of Glen Burnie High School. He was 14 when he began his apprenticeship at the bakery he would later own. From 1943 to 1947, he served in the Navy as an electrician and was stationed in Guam, Hawaii and South America.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
CHESTERTOWN - Eastern Shore environmental activists are warning that 400 pages of guidelines proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency would lower water-quality standards for the Chester River, ending cleanup efforts for a 25-mile stretch of the waterway and limiting the restoration of underwater grasses that are crucial for crabs and other sea life. The Chester River Association, led by Eileen McLellan, mailed 1,500 letters to supporters last week criticizing the conclusions of the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program and its data on the health of the river and its watershed.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Chesapeake Bay oysters -- ravaged by drought and disease -- are becoming so scarce that state biologists expect this year's harvest to be the smallest since Maryland began keeping records in 1870. Biologists completing a survey of the oyster population this week blame the decline on a three-year drought that has created a saltier bay and a favorable habitat for the diseases that have been killing oysters for decades. "We're seeing diseases literally robbing the bay of the oysters," said Christopher Judy, director of the state Department of Natural Resources' shellfish division.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
CHESTERTOWN - Eileen McLellan is about to spend her days in a no-nonsense, 20-foot runabout scrutinizing the impaired Chester River. The dead zones where underwater grasses have all but disappeared. The farmland erosion and runoff from every back yard, parking lot and paved road that pours in from a 390-square-mile watershed each time it rains. Its narrow headwaters in southern Delaware, and its wide mouth where watermen catch crabs and oysters off Kent Island. McLellan, a Yale and Cambridge trained geologist, former College Park professor and environmental lobbyist, has been hired as the first "riverkeeper" to patrol Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay. She is the second riverkeeper in the state and one of nearly 100 around the world.
NEWS
November 17, 2001
A VALUABLE swath of Chester River wetlands, woodlands and fields will be spared from the onslaught of development in fast-growing, suburban Queen Anne's County. Delmarva fox squirrel, waterfowl and other wildlife can continue to roam the 5,000 acres of Chino Farms under a permanent easement brokered by the nonprofit Conservation Fund. Federal, state and county funds of $8 million are protecting the open land owned by the Harry Sears family just upriver from Chestertown. It is the largest single easement negotiated in Maryland, one that not only protects endangered and rare species but also preserves a potentially vulnerable stretch of Chester River shoreline.
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