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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1995
For five weeks her chest ached, but Rosalie Geisler, 55, did her darndest to ignore it. Then, in the middle of the night, a sharp pain woke her. By morning, it marched down her left arm, leaving her fingertips almost numb.Mrs. Geisler put it out of her mind and left for her manager's job at the Cake Cottage in Perry Hall. Later, her worried husband arrived with doctor's orders to take her to the hospital."I didn't want to come," she says after a team of nurses at St. Joseph Hospital descend on her to hook her up to a heart monitor.
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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, but many don't recognize the warning signs. They may ignore the symptoms or mistake them for more benign ailments. Dr. Shannon J. Winakur, medical director of the Women's Heart Center at Saint Agnes Hospital, said women should be more aware of heart disease and how to prevent it. How are the warning signs of heart disease different in women? Warning signs of heart disease typically occur with exertion and go away with rest. The classic symptom of heart disease is a dull tightness in the center of the chest, which may or may not radiate to the neck, jaw, left shoulder or left arm. Women can certainly have these symptoms, but they also often describe sharp or burning chest pain.
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NEWS
February 29, 2000
Howard County Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. was admitted to Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore yesterday after feeling chest pain this weekend, court officials said. Kane, the chief administrative judge for Howard County Circuit Court, is undergoing medical tests on his heart at Union Memorial and could be out for several weeks depending on test results, the officials said. Kane, 61, has been serving on the Howard County Circuit Court bench since 1982 and has been the administrative judge since 1991.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Kelly Brewington and Baltimore Sun reporters | March 5, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake stepped out of a black SUV shortly after being released from the hospital Thursday afternoon and teetered in stiletto heels toward City Hall. "I guess I wore the wrong shoes to show I'm back on my feet," she said with a wry grin. The mayor was hospitalized for 11 hours after she awoke before dawn with chest pains, numbness and dizziness. Doctors performed a battery of tests and determined that the 39-year-old was suffering from gastrointestinal difficulties, she said.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Vice President Dick Cheney, who has suffered four heart attacks, checked himself into a hospital yesterday after complaining of chest pains and underwent surgery to clear a partially blocked artery. Doctors said Cheney would remain overnight at George Washington University Hospital and probably be released today. A White House spokesman said that Cheney and his doctors would then decide when the vice president will return to work. Dr. Jonathan Reiner, Cheney's cardiologist, said that "as of now," the vice president did not appear to have suffered another heart attack.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
An article in Monday's Sun about dental problems that can result from oral piercings listed angina as one of several complications noted by doctors. The malady referred to was not angina pectoris - chest pain caused by insufficent blood supply to the heart - but Ludwig's angina, a potentially fatal infection of the neck that can close off a patient's airway.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | April 21, 1992
Q: I have always had a great fear of heart disease because my father died of a heart attack in his early 50s. In the year before his death he often complained of anginal chest pain. Although I am only 39, in recent weeks I have noted occasional episodes of chest pain and worry that they may be angina. How can I tell if my chest pain is due to heart disease?A: Coronary artery disease is the cause of angina pectoris -- a discomfort, usually in the chest, that is most often precipitated by physical activity and promptly relieved by rest.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | March 9, 1993
Exercising in cold weather can cause chest pain in some people who have no problems when they exercise in warm weather. When cold wind blows in your face, your heart rate slows down. This decreases the blood flow to the heart and can cause pain.If the heart muscle is unable to get all the oxygen it needs, it starts to hurt.While freezing your face slows your heart, freezing your fingers makes your heart beat faster. If you have no history of arteriosclerosis and have chest pain when you exercise in cold weather, check with your doctor to rule out possible heart problems.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1991
Blacks are more likely to describe the warning signs of heart attack as suffocation or a sharp, stabbing chest pain instead of the tightness in the chest and pain radiating down the arm that whites describe, a new study indicates.And, because blacks do not perceive feelings of suffocation and sharp chest pain as heart-related, they often experience "dangerous delays" in getting to a hospital, North Carolina investigators reported today."Even physicians may miss the diagnosis if they are not alert to the different pain perceptions in heart attacks among blacks," said Dr. Ross Simpson, a University of North Carolina cardiologist and the study's principal investigator.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1992
I've heard it over and over again. A patient complains that there is just no time in the day to exercise; life is too jampacked with other priorities.But if you do it right, all you need is 36 minutes a week to become fit and stay that way. The key is to alternate between intense and easy exercises during your workouts. It's called interval training, and it works.Fitness means your heart is strong. To strengthen your heart, you have to exercise vigorously enough to raise your pulse rate by at least 20 beats per minute above your resting heart rate.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Kelly Brewington and Baltimore Sun reporters | March 4, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake stepped out of a black SUV shortly after being released from the hospital Thursday afternoon and teetered in stiletto heels toward City Hall. "I guess I wore the wrong shoes to show I'm back on my feet," she said with a wry grin. The mayor was hospitalized for eleven hours after she awoke before dawn with chest pains, numbness and dizziness. Doctors performed a battery of tests and determined that the 39-year-old was suffering from gastro-intestinal difficulties, she said.
NEWS
October 5, 2009
A reader of our Picture of Health blog asked recently how to distinguish the symptoms of heartburn from the symptoms of a heart attack. It turns out to be harder than you might think. Dr. Richard A. Desi, a gastroenterologist at the Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease at Baltimore's Mercy Medical Center, discussed how to tell the difference. "That's actually not a very easy question," Desi said. "It's a difficult question for patients and for doctors." One key, he said, is to look for what are considered the classic symptoms of each.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | August 14, 2008
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. was "resting comfortably" yesterday after undergoing triple-bypass surgery in a Towson hospital, his aides said. The 66-year-old former judge, who was re-elected to his second term as head of the county government in 2006, checked himself into St. Joseph Medical Center on Tuesday after feeling pain in his chest. "He obviously did the right thing," said Dr. Stephen Pollock, the hospital's chief of cardiology and director of its Heart Institute.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
A 36-year-old Baltimore County firefighter suffered a fatal heart attack Saturday, a day after being released from a hospital for treatment of chest pains he experienced while exercising at his station house, fire officials said yesterday. Jarrett Dixon, a 10-year department veteran, began having chest pains Wednesday while using a treadmill at the Halethorpe station, where he was assigned as a fire apparatus driver operator, said Elise Armacost, a Fire Department spokesman. Dixon, who was also a longtime volunteer firefighter at the Liberty Road Volunteer Fire Company, was transported to St. Agnes Hospital for treatment.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | November 9, 2005
An inmate who died of an acute lung infection while in custody in Howard County told the nurse treating him for a suicide attempt that he had cut his wrist so that guards would send him to the hospital for chest pains that had afflicted him for a week. Medical staff at the Howard County Detention Center instead gave Joseph Edward McGee, 38, Motrin in the infirmary, and guards put him on suicide watch alone in a cell, according to the police file released yesterday in response to a Sun records request.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - Testimony in the murder trial of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was put on hold yesterday when the 80-year-old was rushed to a hospital by ambulance, complaining of a "smothering sensation" in his chest. Doctors at Neshoba County General Hospital said they treated Killen for high blood pressure likely related to injuries he sustained in March when a tree he was cutting toppled on his head and broke both legs. Though Killen's condition is "not serious," he was to spend the night in the intensive care unit as a precaution, said Dr. Patrick Eakes, the internist who is overseeing Killen's care.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | April 7, 1992
Many people jog for health and fitness. But if you think you're past that stage and are ready to try racing, here are a few rules:If you want to compete in a race, you have to learn to run at a very fast pace. But you can't train by running very fast for an extended distance or you'll tear your muscles.The best approach is to train by running intervals, which are multiple repeat runs of a shorter distance at race pace with brief rests between each run. Since moving very fast in sports can damage your muscles, you probably should not run intervals in training more than once or twice a week.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | March 16, 1993
Q: We read it's essential to get immediate medical attention at the first sign of a heart attack. It would be easier to follow this advice if I knew what to expect if I have a heart attack.A: A heart attack or myocardial infarction occurs when one of the blood vessels to the heart (coronary arteries) becomes completely blocked. Many heart attack victims have a history of chest pain (angina) that may worsen or occur more often in days before an attack. Others have ill-defined warning symptoms, or experience a heart attack suddenly, without any premonition.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 2004
NEW YORK - Former President Bill Clinton sailed through quadruple bypass surgery yesterday in what surgeons called a routine but necessary operation to prevent a major heart attack. Doctors at New York-Presbyterian Hospital said Clinton could be released from the hospital in four or five days if initial recovery goes well, and that the signs looked good so far. At 4 p.m. yesterday, four hours after surgery, he was said to be under sedation but responding to commands. "He will gradually resume a normal routine of exercise and activity at home," said Dr. Allan Schwartz, chief of cardiology, who did not rule out Clinton's making campaign appearances before the November presidential election.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2004
Former President Bill Clinton, who at age 58 has appeared trim and vigorous, checked into New York Presbyterian Hospital yesterday after suffering chest pains and shortness of breath and was scheduled for quadruple bypass surgery, his office said. Clinton did not suffer a heart attack, but tests earlier in the day at a suburban hospital found four blockages in his coronary arteries that could trigger an attack if left untreated. In a statement last night, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton said her husband would probably undergo surgery early next week.
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