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NEWS
July 18, 2011
Welcome back, old friend. In a summer of discontent across the United States from the record heat wave that's plagued much of the country to the icy deficit reduction talks in Washington, it's good to see a familiar (and might we add unflappable) figure has returned to the Land of Pleasant Living. Let us rejoice in the return of Chessie, the celebrity manatee recently sighted in Calvert County. Thanks to Morgan State University's Estuarine Research Center, the 1,200-pound marine mammal has been positively identified as none other than the one first seen in the Chesapeake Bay 17 years ago. Back in 1994, Chessie's first appearance caused such an uproar - and raised such breathless concern that he wouldn't survive as local water temperatures dropped in the fall - that he was "rescued" and air-lifted back to his native Florida on a U.S. Coast Guard C-130.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Roy L. Barker, a retired Chessie System chief clerk and World War II veteran, died Sept. 2 at Oak Crest Village in Parkville of complications from a stroke. He was 91. The son of Murvin Barker, a city police officer, and Marie Barker, a homemaker, Roy Lyman Barker was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. After graduating in 1941 from City College, he went to work as a clerk for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He then joined the Army and trained with the 88th Glider Infantry in Sturgis, S.D. Mr. Barker then volunteered for parachute infantry school at Fort Benning, Ga. After completing jump school, he was assigned to the 515th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 13th Airborne Division.
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NEWS
October 3, 1990
Services for Charles Ellsworth Davidson, a retired Chessie System train dispatcher, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Epiphany Lutheran Church, 4301 Raspe Ave.Mr. Davidson, who was 71 and lived on Ontario Avenue in Carney, died Monday at the Good Samaritan Hospital after a heart attack.He worked many years for the former Baltimore and Ohio railroad before retiring about five years ago.The Baltimore native was a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute.He is survived by a brother, Milton L. Davidson of Annapolis; two nieces, Linda White of Cockeysville and Elaine Sauer of Parkton; and three nephews, Guy White of Carney, Scott Davidson of Pasadena and Lee Davidson of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Arthur E. Dase, a retired Chessie System supervisor and longtime Greater Baltimore Medical Center volunteer, died May 19 of heart failure at his winter home in Seminole, Fla. He was 91. "I always thought that Arthur was devoted to two things: his family and the railroad," said Robert W. "Bob" Breiner, who worked for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and later Chessie System. "He was also well-liked by the other railroaders. " The son of John Dase, a toolmaker, and Leona Dase, a homemaker, Arthur Earl Dase was born in Springfield, Ohio.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1997
Chessie Racing, the Maryland team entered in the Whitbread Round the World Race that starts in September, has its Whitbread 60 well along in the construction process and plans to begin crew training and boat testing in late April."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman | September 21, 1997
Flag: USASail number: USA60Designer: Bruce FarrBuilder: Goetz Custom BoatsShore manager: Bryan FishbackLaunch: April 1997Skipper: George CollinsCollins, 57, a co-skipper on Chessie, created the syndicate more than a year ago and serves as the shore and race crew's all-around leader.A native of West Haven, Conn., Collins started sailing on Long Island Sound shortly after high school. In 1990, he completed his first offshore competition, the Annapolis to Bermuda race. Since then, he has participated in several ocean races along the East Coast - including Key West Race Week and S.O.R.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER | November 19, 1997
The past seven days have been a mixture of frustration and exultation aboard Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race.Chessie has experienced extended calms, collided with a whale, changed from shorts and T-shirts to cold weather survival suits and on Monday received its first blast of heavy weather from the Roaring 40s."Yahoo! The Southern Ocean is here at last," Whitbread veteran and Chessie watch captain Grant Spanhake reported in Monday's electronic mail to race headquarters.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race, was running in sixth place in today's second position report at 6 a.m. (GMT) as the fleet neared Barbuda and the last turn toward Fort Lauderdale, Fla.Once the turn is made, it is possible Chessie will benefit from a broader sailing angle, and make up ground lost during the past week - although crew member Tony Rey reported in an e-mail that the Maryland boat has been flying for days."We are ripping down the trade wind pipeline under jib top, staysail and full main," said Rey, aboard the Maryland boat for the first time on this leg that began in Sao Sebastiao, Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gilbert Lewthwaite and By Gilbert Lewthwaite,Special to the Sun | April 29, 2001
"Chessie Racing: The Story of Maryland's Entry in the 1997-98 Whitbread Round the World Race," by George J. Collins and Kathy Alexander. Johns Hopkins University Press. 240 pages. $34.95. This is a book for several audiences -- the serious sailor, the vicarious adventurer, and the proud Maryland landlubber. Chessie Racing's entry into the 1997-98 Whitbread Round the World Race engaged an interest far beyond the normal appeal of ocean racing, even in a water-bred community like ours. This was achieved, in major part, through the first partnership between an ocean racing syndicate and a nonprofit organization, the Living Classrooms Foundation.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
On Sept. 21, Chessie and its Baltimore-Annapolis crew and support group will begin the Whitbread Round the World Race -- nine legs and more than 30,000 miles of the toughest racing on the planet.Chessie Racing president Mark K. Fischer said last week that Chessie and its crew are rounding into shape quickly as the start in Southampton, England, nears."We have made the final crew selections and the boat has to be measured [certified]," said Fischer, also Chessie's co-skipper, while in town last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2014
It's the one weekend in Baltimore when people riding large objects through land, water, sand and mud is a common sight. It's time again for American Visionary Art Museum 's Kinetic Sculpture Race. Kinetic veterans Melissa and Phillip Smith will be competing in the race, entering with their sculpture, Chessie, a front-wheel drive, rear steering, reverse trike that resembles a sea monster. "We build it with as little new material as possible and use lots of items we find on the roadside and construction Dumpsters, calling it 'sculpture treasure,'" said Melissa Smith, 35, of Catonsville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Chessie M. Brailey, a civil rights activist who had been married to former state legislator F. Troy Brailey, died Dec.16 from complications of dementia at her daughter's Harbor Court condominium. The former longtime Easterwood Park resident was 94. "Chessie had a wonderful spirit and was serious about the community and the advancement of African-Americans. She provided tremendous support for her husband," said the Rev. James L. Carter, pastor of East North Avenue's Ark Church and a longtime friend.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
If Ripley's Believe It or Not! opens a proposed "odditorium" museum at the Inner Harbor, it will be hard to miss. To lure visitors to its collection of "amazing exhibits" and "unbelievable & genuine artifacts from around the globe," the Orlando, Fla.-based entertainment company wants an attention-grabbing facade at its proposed site in the Light Street Pavilion at Harborplace. But city officials are pressing the company to tone down the facade's design, which initially featured a three-dimensional sea monster bursting from the building, teeth bared, as its green body coiled around a three-masted ship.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Welcome back, old friend. In a summer of discontent across the United States from the record heat wave that's plagued much of the country to the icy deficit reduction talks in Washington, it's good to see a familiar (and might we add unflappable) figure has returned to the Land of Pleasant Living. Let us rejoice in the return of Chessie, the celebrity manatee recently sighted in Calvert County. Thanks to Morgan State University's Estuarine Research Center, the 1,200-pound marine mammal has been positively identified as none other than the one first seen in the Chesapeake Bay 17 years ago. Back in 1994, Chessie's first appearance caused such an uproar - and raised such breathless concern that he wouldn't survive as local water temperatures dropped in the fall - that he was "rescued" and air-lifted back to his native Florida on a U.S. Coast Guard C-130.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Chessie, the wandering Florida manatee that has visited the Chesapeake Bay at least twice over the past 17 years, is back. The well-traveled mammal has not been seen since 2001, and his resurfacing is making waves among marine scientists and bay folk alike. "I wanted to let you know that the [U.S. Geological Survey] identified the manatee from Wednesday, and it's a familiar face to us … it's Chessie!," said Jennifer Dittmar, stranding coordinator for the National Aquarium, in an email to a Calvert Marine Museum staffer, confirming the animal's return.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
State officials placed at least 32 children in foster homes despite credible evidence that the care providers had abused or neglected children, according to a General Assembly audit released Friday. Auditors found that officials with the Social Services Administration also failed to follow up on 159 children born to parents who had had their parental rights terminated for abuse or neglect. The auditors blamed the computer system that the Maryland agency uses to monitor child services and said many of the deficiencies had not been corrected.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 4, 1993
Pieces of column too short to use . . .Dog overboard . . . Richard Schubert can't say for sure how Chessie, his yellow Lab, wound up doing the ole dogstroke off Hart-Miller Island last Saturday morning.Before he anchored for the night and retired to the cabin of his 21-foot boat, Date Bait -- "Hey, I'm a single guy" -- Schubert tethered his dog to the railing. Somehow, Chessie got free from her collar.Another boater found her about 100 yards offshore, pulled her aboard, then gave her to a third boater who happened by.Schubert went nuts when he awoke.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Chessie, the Baltimore-Annapolis entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race, is en route to England, where the nine-leg sailing competition will begin next month.With skipper George Collins and team president Mark K. Fischer aboard along with its 12-man crew, Chessie is sailing in company with Toshiba, the Dennis Conner entry in the race.Whitbread entries are required to log 3,000 miles offshore before the start on Sept. 21, and the two Whitbread 60s will train against each other on the Atlantic crossing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Each year, contestants in the Kinetic Sculpture Race are required to write a short summary of the amphibious mechanical creatures they plan to build. These descriptions are short stories in miniature, frequently poignant and deceptively profound. Just kidding. But, the synopses are amusing. Here are some of our favorites from this year: •Carver Cobra II: "The last Cobra drowned during water entry at Canton. This one has had swimming lessons." •Going to Hell: "Fire, Brimstone, Devils, Oh My!"
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
Raymond Henry Holter Jr., a retired Chessie System executive whose more than four-decade railroad career began on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in the late 1920s, died Saturday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Loreley resident was 100. Mr. Holter was born at home on his parents' 13-acre farm in Upper Falls, where he spent his early years. In 1922, the family purchased a 134-acre farm in Loreley, where he lived the remainder of his life. He attended Towson High School until he was 14, when he dropped out to help his father run the farm.
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