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NEWS
By David Horsey | September 14, 2013
I'd love to be an invisible presence in the room the next time Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin sit down for a chat. The high stakes drama of the Cold War is gone, but the Russian president is the American president's nemesis on everything from sarin gas attacks in Syria to gay rights in Russia. To see them spar would be enlightening entertainment. After intelligence specialist Edward Snowden leaked information about U.S. cyberspying earlier this year, he went on the lam and found refuge in Moscow.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | September 14, 2013
I'd love to be an invisible presence in the room the next time Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin sit down for a chat. The high stakes drama of the Cold War is gone, but the Russian president is the American president's nemesis on everything from sarin gas attacks in Syria to gay rights in Russia. To see them spar would be enlightening entertainment. After intelligence specialist Edward Snowden leaked information about U.S. cyberspying earlier this year, he went on the lam and found refuge in Moscow.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
Aleksander "Wojo" Wojtkiewicz, an internationally ranked chess player who won a chess scholarship to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and had played on its championship team, died of an intestinal hemorrhage Friday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Halethorpe resident was 43. Born in Riga, Latvia, he moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., about 10 years ago and to Maryland in 2002 after being recruited by UMBC. "He was quite a figure in the chess community throughout the United States," said Peter Gunst, an attorney and part-owner of Fells Point Chess.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | April 5, 2008
As the Down and Dirty Dawg pep band blared Michael Jackson's Thriller and the theme to Hawaii Five-O, scores of University of Maryland, Baltimore County students marveled at the scene unfolding in the student commons, complete with cheerleaders, the school mascot, the school dance team and a chess set with pieces 6 feet tall. "Are we allowed to play with those?" asked UMBC sophomore Rupa Patel of Annapolis, as classmates posed for cell-phone photos with the oversized pieces and hoisted them from square to square as if staging an impromptu game.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
Nine days ago, Battsetseg Tsagaan was sitting in a cafe studying for her last exam. It was easy compared to the cramming she still faced for today's Pan American collegiate chess championship in Miami. Her jobs as a mom, student, teacher and wife leave little time for her talent as one of the top college chess players in the United States. Once, she had the luxury of preparing for a tournament for a month. Now she's happy to have had at least these last few days to get back into the swing of things.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1996
His black cap said "Repent," but after a morning at his street-corner pulpit at Eutaw and Saratoga, Larry Eugene Smith yielded to an earthly temptation -- chess."
FEATURES
By John Dorschner and John Dorschner,Knight-Ridder | December 4, 1990
Call it the "Nerd Factor." That's the image of chess in the United States: the guy with glasses as thick as Coke bottle bottoms, six pens in his ink-stained pocket, an off-key laugh that seems rather bizarre at best.And that's the good image, considering the past. Consider Paul Morphy, the greatest American chess player of the 19th century. ended up a babbling madman, suffering from paranoid delusions. Consider Bobby Fischer, the greatest American chess player of the 20th century. After he won the world championship in 1972, he went into hiding in Southern California, avoiding all chess competition, surfacing occasionally only in odd rumors that he was spending his days distributing religious pamphlets in mall parking lots.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF Staff writer Tom Pelton contributed to this article | June 1, 1998
Baltimore police swept the park in front of City Hall Friday and Saturday nights, handing out 14 citations for having open containers of alcohol, routing six squatters from cardboard boxes and charging five people on a variety of minor charges."
NEWS
By SAM BRAIDS | December 16, 2005
The recent crackdown on local poker tournaments makes me wonder why the vice squad has not gone after the organizers of local chess tournaments. As in a poker tournament, each participant in a chess tournament must pay an entry fee on registration. The money collected is used to pay for the cost of the event, its organizers and to form a prize award for the winners. The stock response to my seemingly absurd question is that poker is gambling because it involves luck while chess is not because it depends on skill.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | May 24, 1992
MOSCOW -- They used to say here that the qualities that make a good chess player are the same qualities that make a good Communist.Perseverance, a belief in the power of logic to overcome obstacles, strategic thinking, patience, aggressiveness: All these were held up as Soviet ideals.So for 70 years the nation actively promoted chess as a symbol of Soviet prowess -- "Take chess to the workers!" was a slogan coined in 1923 -- although after the debacle of August it could be argued that the Soviet Union produced more good chess players than it did good Communists.
NEWS
December 28, 2006
It's a major collegiate tournament complete with colorful play-by-play and an audience of rabid fans watching well-conditioned players use their skills to outwit and outmaneuver their opponents. But this isn't one of the many college football bowl games that so dominate the airwaves at this time of year. The play-by-play is delivered through headphones and the audience can be counted by the dozens rather than the thousands. This is the Pan-American chess tournament, one of the most prestigious collegiate championships, and the reigning champion, University of Maryland Baltimore County, which has won the tournament a record seven times, has been an admirable leader in recognizing and rewarding a different kind of scholar-athlete.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
Aleksander "Wojo" Wojtkiewicz, an internationally ranked chess player who won a chess scholarship to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and had played on its championship team, died of an intestinal hemorrhage Friday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Halethorpe resident was 43. Born in Riga, Latvia, he moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., about 10 years ago and to Maryland in 2002 after being recruited by UMBC. "He was quite a figure in the chess community throughout the United States," said Peter Gunst, an attorney and part-owner of Fells Point Chess.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 3, 2006
When Kayla Johnson plunked her queen down on the square known in chess notation as f3, I knew she was trying to set me up for what we chess aficionados call a "fool's mate." Kayla Johnson, all of 10 years old, who makes A's in all her classes at Cross Country Elementary School and made the honor roll the first three quarters of this school year, had correctly pegged me as a fool. But there's a limit even to my foolery. I took what I thought were the necessary steps to block the fool's mate.
NEWS
By SAM BRAIDS | December 16, 2005
The recent crackdown on local poker tournaments makes me wonder why the vice squad has not gone after the organizers of local chess tournaments. As in a poker tournament, each participant in a chess tournament must pay an entry fee on registration. The money collected is used to pay for the cost of the event, its organizers and to form a prize award for the winners. The stock response to my seemingly absurd question is that poker is gambling because it involves luck while chess is not because it depends on skill.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
Nine days ago, Battsetseg Tsagaan was sitting in a cafe studying for her last exam. It was easy compared to the cramming she still faced for today's Pan American collegiate chess championship in Miami. Her jobs as a mom, student, teacher and wife leave little time for her talent as one of the top college chess players in the United States. Once, she had the luxury of preparing for a tournament for a month. Now she's happy to have had at least these last few days to get back into the swing of things.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
It was a classic mismatch: the Baltimore Ravens vs. a roomful of adolescents no more likely to bench press 300 pounds than jump over the moon. The Ravens did the only thing they could - beg for mercy. The Knights of Valor, a Baltimore-based chess program for city youth, got the chance last night not only to meet the stars of the football team but, based on the results of an earlier match-up, a pretty good chance at beating them, and badly. "You guys have to take it easy on us," said Adalious Thomas, a Ravens defensive back who helped organize last night's match and one earlier in the year.
NEWS
By Patrick L. Hickerson and Patrick L. Hickerson,Staff writer | August 18, 1991
Sid Robertson always felt compelled to do more with chess than just play.In the early 1980s, he edited The King's File, a chess gazette for the Washington area. And in May, Robertson, 52, took his promotion of the game even further when he opened Chess by the Creek, a chess studio and tournament site on the first floor of the 2 1/2-story office building behind Fire Station No. 2 on Main Street in Ellicott City.The creek in the studio's name is the Hudson Branch, which flows on the south side of the building and empties into the Patapsco River.
NEWS
December 28, 2006
It's a major collegiate tournament complete with colorful play-by-play and an audience of rabid fans watching well-conditioned players use their skills to outwit and outmaneuver their opponents. But this isn't one of the many college football bowl games that so dominate the airwaves at this time of year. The play-by-play is delivered through headphones and the audience can be counted by the dozens rather than the thousands. This is the Pan-American chess tournament, one of the most prestigious collegiate championships, and the reigning champion, University of Maryland Baltimore County, which has won the tournament a record seven times, has been an admirable leader in recognizing and rewarding a different kind of scholar-athlete.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Ask most chess grandmasters if chess is art, and they will say unequivocally, "Yes." Ask them if chess is also a sport, and the answer will again be yes. But suggest that chess might be just a very complex math problem, and there is immediate resistance. The question is more than academic. Beginning tomorrow, Garry Kasparov, the world's top-ranked player and the former world champion, will play a $1 million, six-game match here against a chess program called Deep Junior. It will be the fourth time that Kasparov has matched wits against a computer and the first time since he lost a similar match in 1997 to Deep Blue, a chess-playing computer developed by IBM. Recently, Vladimir Kramnik, Kasparov's former protege and the current world champion, tied an eight-game match against another chess-playing program called Deep Fritz.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson, Dennis O'Brien and Scott Calvert and Kimberly A.C. Wilson, Dennis O'Brien and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
The now-infamous letter left at a sniper scene included a common Caribbean salutation: "Mr. Police." A suspicious caller to the toll-free tip line spoke with an accent. The trunk of the $250 Chevrolet Caprice in which John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo spent their last hours of freedom had been modified so that someone could wriggle in from the back seat and covertly fire a rifle. All of these clues suggest that Malvo, a slight, short, 17-year- old Jamaican native, could have played an active role in the 13 Washington-area shootings that killed 10 people, wounded three and terrorized millions more.
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