Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChess Match
IN THE NEWS

Chess Match

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
October 31, 1992
The 27th game in the chess match between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky is scheduled to be played today in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Results will be published in Section A of The Sunday Sun.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
CHICAGO - The first half of the Orioles' six-game, weeklong trip to Chicago was a success in more ways than one. They beat up on the floundering Chicago White Sox, sweeping the three-game series at U.S. Cellular Field. Fate shined down on the Orioles, but that seems to happen when you're playing as well as this team's playing. On Tuesday, while the Chicago Cubs waited through a four-hour rain delay at Wrigley Field, not a drop fell on the city's South Side, even though the ballparks are less than 10 miles apart.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
It was like a chess match played with nothing but pawns.Two Phils, Regan and Garner, played the game-within-a-game in the eighth inning of the Orioles' 2-0 win over Milwaukee on Monday night. The diamond became a chessboard as the two matched wits -- and pawns.The Phil in the black cap emerged as the clear winner. He did so despite a dangerous play that led to the toppling of Milwaukee Phil, the riverboat gambler whose big move cost him his king of swat without a swing being taken.You have to follow this one closely, then try to rationalize the sequence of events.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
INDIANAPOLIS - The Ravens slugged it out with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Tennessee Titans the past two weeks, proving their toughness to the rest of the NFL. When the Ravens (2-2) line up against the Indianapolis Colts (2-2) today, it will be a challenge unlike any other. Battling quarterback Peyton Manning is a test of brains, not brawn. "It's kind of like a chess match," Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis said. But the pieces happen to be 300-pound linemen, million-dollar receivers and Pro Bowl linebackers.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
A few weeks ago, Dan Marino cried out to defensive coordinators on national television to blitz Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning more often. Consider the wish granted. As Manning pursues Marino's single-season touchdown record, the Ravens will initiate a hunt of their own Sunday night, chasing down the NFL's most dangerous quarterback any way possible. Whether it's sending an extra linebacker, safety or cornerback - or simply giving the appearance of a rush - the game plan is to attack the pocket passer rather than react.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
In yesterday's Today sections, one of the moves in the chess match between Garry Kasparov and the IBM computer Deep Blue was listed incorrectly. Mr. Kasparov's 40th move should have been recorded as Ra7.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Barbara Traub | November 14, 1991
CHESS STORY opened in September 1990, when Damon Norko rented the building on the corner of Park and Mulberry streets where the late Abe Sherman used to rule irascibly.The bookshelves of Sherman's Out of Town News remain, but now books on chess strategy and tactics have replaced paperbacks and foreign press publications. Handcrafted chess boards, sculpted pieces and framed newspaper clippings about chess tournaments fill the large storefront window.Night after night, players compete from 6 p.m. until midnight.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
Even before his 171-pound bout with Hammond's Scott Wallace began, Chris Currence realized only one result would help South Carroll win."I knew that I had to go out there and pin the kid," said Currence, a senior who is the top-ranked wrestler in the West region in his weight class. "I knew that I had to put him in some kind of pinning move for us to win."Currence didn't disappoint himself or his teammates as his pin in 1: 52 clinched a 47-22 Cavaliers victory over the visiting Bears in a tri-meet in Winfield last night.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 16, 1996
Garry Kasparov, human genius, is locked in a death struggle (OK, a chess match; same thing) with a computer. The six-game series is tied, with two to play. And should K-- am I wrong here? -- a machine.You know what they always said. They always said that a computer may be able to do three trillion calculations a second, but it could never paint like van Gogh or, even if it had ears, chop either of them off.There's no mystery to a computer, they said. It's just a fancy machine.In fact, within the scientific community, there is something called the James Brown Theorem, which holds that computers may be clever but they have no soul.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
When Jose E. "Pepe" Herrera left Cuba in 1955, he thought he might never have a reason to go back.Last week, he found one: a chess tournament.As part of Baltimore's contact with residents of the island, the Ellicott City resident and five top-ranked area chess players traveled to Havana for four days to compete with Cuban players.A mostly teen-age crew of Cubans soundly defeated the Americans. But, for both sides, the visit was an exhilarating reminder that, despite still-strained official relations between their countries, Cubans and Americans have much in common.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 19, 2008
They don't have to search for Bobby Fischer any longer. The American chess master died Thursday in Reykjavik, Iceland, where he won the most famous match in the history of his game, beating Boris Spassky in the summer of 1972. He was 64. As with most competitions between the United States and the Soviet Union, the significance of the game was magnified beyond all reason by the real or imagined implications. These contests - chess, basketball, it didn't matter - were seen as morality plays, pitting ideologies of good and evil against each other.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
A few weeks ago, Dan Marino cried out to defensive coordinators on national television to blitz Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning more often. Consider the wish granted. As Manning pursues Marino's single-season touchdown record, the Ravens will initiate a hunt of their own Sunday night, chasing down the NFL's most dangerous quarterback any way possible. Whether it's sending an extra linebacker, safety or cornerback - or simply giving the appearance of a rush - the game plan is to attack the pocket passer rather than react.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
Even before his 171-pound bout with Hammond's Scott Wallace began, Chris Currence realized only one result would help South Carroll win."I knew that I had to go out there and pin the kid," said Currence, a senior who is the top-ranked wrestler in the West region in his weight class. "I knew that I had to put him in some kind of pinning move for us to win."Currence didn't disappoint himself or his teammates as his pin in 1: 52 clinched a 47-22 Cavaliers victory over the visiting Bears in a tri-meet in Winfield last night.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
When Jose E. "Pepe" Herrera left Cuba in 1955, he thought he might never have a reason to go back.Last week, he found one: a chess tournament.As part of Baltimore's contact with residents of the island, the Ellicott City resident and five top-ranked area chess players traveled to Havana for four days to compete with Cuban players.A mostly teen-age crew of Cubans soundly defeated the Americans. But, for both sides, the visit was an exhilarating reminder that, despite still-strained official relations between their countries, Cubans and Americans have much in common.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
Robert Alston was a regular among the guys who gathered daily for chess matches at War Memorial Plaza. He would arrive in the late morning and spend most of the afternoon playing, all comers welcome."
NEWS
February 16, 1996
In yesterday's Today sections, one of the moves in the chess match between Garry Kasparov and the IBM computer Deep Blue was listed incorrectly. Mr. Kasparov's 40th move should have been recorded as Ra7.The Sun regrets the errors.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 19, 2008
They don't have to search for Bobby Fischer any longer. The American chess master died Thursday in Reykjavik, Iceland, where he won the most famous match in the history of his game, beating Boris Spassky in the summer of 1972. He was 64. As with most competitions between the United States and the Soviet Union, the significance of the game was magnified beyond all reason by the real or imagined implications. These contests - chess, basketball, it didn't matter - were seen as morality plays, pitting ideologies of good and evil against each other.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
His head in his hands, Shonari Warren ponders his next move. He's lost his queen, a rook, a knight and several pawns, and the chess match -- his second of the day -- looks hopeless for him."Man, I made all the wrong moves," he moans. He toys with two white pawns and a bishop he won from his opponent. The game ends with five moves.Shonari, 16, is an eighth-grader at the Baltimore Alternative Middle School. He was one of 75 students who competed yesterday in the third annual city public school chess tournament.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 16, 1996
Garry Kasparov, human genius, is locked in a death struggle (OK, a chess match; same thing) with a computer. The six-game series is tied, with two to play. And should K-- am I wrong here? -- a machine.You know what they always said. They always said that a computer may be able to do three trillion calculations a second, but it could never paint like van Gogh or, even if it had ears, chop either of them off.There's no mystery to a computer, they said. It's just a fancy machine.In fact, within the scientific community, there is something called the James Brown Theorem, which holds that computers may be clever but they have no soul.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 18, 1995
NEW YORK: The thing to remember about chess is that it's not professional wrestling.I try to keep this in mind as I'm sitting 107 stories above God's green earth, or at least above New York City, on the observation deck of the World Trade Center, watching bad-boy Garry Kasparov hunch over chess pieces. He is defending his world championship against Viswanathan Anand, known in the chess world as "Vishy."The first thing that strikes me is that I'm at a world-class sporting event and nobody is tuning up with "We will, we will rock you."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.