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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
Winning six games out of nine, Eugene Perelshteyn, captain of the chess team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, took home the title of U.S. Junior Chess champion yesterday. The Russian-born sophomore from Swampscott, Mass., lost only one game. Two ended in ties. He beat out the nine other top-rated competitors age 20 and younger in the invitational tournament sponsored by the U.S. Chess Federation and held at UMBC this month. Perelshteyn, 20, a computer science major who helped lead UMBC to its third national chess title in December, will receive a $40,000, scholarship.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
The first chess player to arrive, bright-eyed Quentin R. Moore, came from Centreville, Va., to Fells Point yesterday to match wits in an afternoon tournament against a dozen older opponents in the game of kings. At 10, Quentin was the budding player in the field, and while he didn't win, he didn't do half-badly either. The highest-ranked player his age in Virginia, he beat electrical engineer Hayes E. Bowling, 25, a player with a U.S. Chess Federation rating of 1869. Even though Quentin's official rating is just beginning to break into the above-average 1500s, he never wavered from his intense gaze or game yesterday at Fells Point Chess, a small shop at 1717 Aliceanna St. "I came all the way to Baltimore to play," Quentin said.
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FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1996
Why did the International Chess Federation, the governing body of world chess, choose Baghdad as the site for its next championship match between the Russian Anatoly Karpov and the Russian-born American, Gata Kamsky?For the same reason, chess sources say, that Willy Sutton robbed banks: It's where the money is.FIDE President Kirsan Ilumjinov announced yesterday in Paris that the match was set for June in Iraq, and that Saddam Hussein would play host. He also said the winner would get $2 million.
NEWS
January 6, 2004
UMBC's fervor for chess adds to competition The Sun's article on the University of Maryland, Baltimore County chess team's second-place finish in the Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship overlooked several essential facts ("Without 3 stars, winning streak ends for UMBC chess team," Dec. 31). The article leads readers to believe that the eligibility of past players was questionable. However, the players representing UMBC at previous tournaments met all eligibility requirements in place at the time of those tournaments.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
In a chess match hyped as man vs. machine yesterday, technology won.But humanity's supporters cried foul and said the computer's temper tantrums may have swayed the outcome.International grandmaster Gennady Sagalchik -- ranked 35th in the country by the United States Chess Federation -- lost his 7 1/2 -hour game against a 512-processor Intel Paragon Supercomputer at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."Both sides made mistakes," said Dr. Alan T. Sherman, a UMBC computer science professor and an organizer of the match.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
It'll be high-level chess in a waterfront setting, bankrolled by a wealthy businessman.A reprise of last year's $5 million match between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky that began on an island off the coast of what was once Yugoslavia?Not quite.But what it will be is the U.S. Chess Federation's 1993 National Amateur Team Championship finals, to be held Saturday and Sunday at the HarborView Marina and Yacht Club at 500 HarborView Dr. in Baltimore.The event will bring together four teams, each with four players, who won regional events earlier this month.
NEWS
By Karen E. Ludwig and Karen E. Ludwig,Contributing Writer | April 29, 1994
To 18-year-old Jawan Parker, chess isn't just a game for brains and bores."People will say to me a lot, 'You don't look like a person who plays chess,' " said the tall, athletically built student, who enjoys playing basketball.But, sure enough, before and after school, and even during his lunch break, he can be found in City College High School's chess club room, practicing his game."It helps me develop my imagination, my patience and my analytical thinking skills," he said.That hard work has earned him and his teammates -- Harry Martin, Zenon Pantazonis and Donte Everett -- a weekend trip to Michigan.
NEWS
September 3, 1993
It sounds like boxing, with rival world governing bodies proclaiming rival champions. Chess has, indeed, much in common with boxing in its shear combative intensity. But just for consumer guidance: The 24-game, 8-week, so-called world championship match between champion Garry Kasparov and challenger Nigel Short sponsored by the Times of London is the real thing.The rival match sponsored by the World Chess Federation (or FIDE), between former world champion Anatoly Karpov andDutch grandmaster Jan Timman, in the Dutch town of Zwolle and in Oman, is the phony.
NEWS
November 5, 2000
Champion dethroned AN ERA ENDED in London on Thursday when Garry Kasparov conceded a draw to Vladimir Kramnik after four hours of the 15th game of their world championship match. That gave Mr. Kramnik a victorious 8.5 points in the 16-game, month-long match with one game left to play, and the world title. It ended the incredible 15-year reign of the moody, irascible Mr. Kasparov. But it made a difference only in the world of chess, which is like baseball in that those who don't care, don't care.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 6, 1993
LONDON -- So far the run-up has been more Atlantic City than Savoy Hotel.There has been all the hype and hoopla of a heavyweight bout: the mandatory pre-match exchange of insults, the hawking of overpriced tickets and the talk of back-stabbing deals for television coverage.It's not what you would expect from chess. And that's the point. For after the match that begins tomorrow between Gary Kasparov, the world champion since 1985, and Nigel Short, the first British challenger this century, chess may never be the same.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2003
The chess team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County garnered its sixth win in seven years at the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championship this week, taking home $1,000 in prize money and a first-place trophy. In addition to the championship won by the four members of UMBC's B chess team, the four A team members tied for second place with their rivals from the University of Texas at Dallas. UMBC tied with the Texas school for the Pan Am championship in 2000 and 2001. Baltimore grand master Alex Sherzer, nicknamed "The Surgeon," also came away with honors as the best player on board No. 1 for the tournament, which was held Friday through Monday in Miami.
NEWS
November 5, 2000
Champion dethroned AN ERA ENDED in London on Thursday when Garry Kasparov conceded a draw to Vladimir Kramnik after four hours of the 15th game of their world championship match. That gave Mr. Kramnik a victorious 8.5 points in the 16-game, month-long match with one game left to play, and the world title. It ended the incredible 15-year reign of the moody, irascible Mr. Kasparov. But it made a difference only in the world of chess, which is like baseball in that those who don't care, don't care.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
Winning six games out of nine, Eugene Perelshteyn, captain of the chess team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, took home the title of U.S. Junior Chess champion yesterday. The Russian-born sophomore from Swampscott, Mass., lost only one game. Two ended in ties. He beat out the nine other top-rated competitors age 20 and younger in the invitational tournament sponsored by the U.S. Chess Federation and held at UMBC this month. Perelshteyn, 20, a computer science major who helped lead UMBC to its third national chess title in December, will receive a $40,000, scholarship.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1996
Why did the International Chess Federation, the governing body of world chess, choose Baghdad as the site for its next championship match between the Russian Anatoly Karpov and the Russian-born American, Gata Kamsky?For the same reason, chess sources say, that Willy Sutton robbed banks: It's where the money is.FIDE President Kirsan Ilumjinov announced yesterday in Paris that the match was set for June in Iraq, and that Saddam Hussein would play host. He also said the winner would get $2 million.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
In a chess match hyped as man vs. machine yesterday, technology won.But humanity's supporters cried foul and said the computer's temper tantrums may have swayed the outcome.International grandmaster Gennady Sagalchik -- ranked 35th in the country by the United States Chess Federation -- lost his 7 1/2 -hour game against a 512-processor Intel Paragon Supercomputer at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."Both sides made mistakes," said Dr. Alan T. Sherman, a UMBC computer science professor and an organizer of the match.
NEWS
By Karen E. Ludwig and Karen E. Ludwig,Contributing Writer | April 29, 1994
To 18-year-old Jawan Parker, chess isn't just a game for brains and bores."People will say to me a lot, 'You don't look like a person who plays chess,' " said the tall, athletically built student, who enjoys playing basketball.But, sure enough, before and after school, and even during his lunch break, he can be found in City College High School's chess club room, practicing his game."It helps me develop my imagination, my patience and my analytical thinking skills," he said.That hard work has earned him and his teammates -- Harry Martin, Zenon Pantazonis and Donte Everett -- a weekend trip to Michigan.
FEATURES
By John Dorschner and John Dorschner,Knight-Ridder | December 4, 1990
Call it the "Nerd Factor." That's the image of chess in the United States: the guy with glasses as thick as Coke bottle bottoms, six pens in his ink-stained pocket, an off-key laugh that seems rather bizarre at best.And that's the good image, considering the past. Consider Paul Morphy, the greatest American chess player of the 19th century. ended up a babbling madman, suffering from paranoid delusions. Consider Bobby Fischer, the greatest American chess player of the 20th century. After he won the world championship in 1972, he went into hiding in Southern California, avoiding all chess competition, surfacing occasionally only in odd rumors that he was spending his days distributing religious pamphlets in mall parking lots.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2003
The chess team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County garnered its sixth win in seven years at the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championship this week, taking home $1,000 in prize money and a first-place trophy. In addition to the championship won by the four members of UMBC's B chess team, the four A team members tied for second place with their rivals from the University of Texas at Dallas. UMBC tied with the Texas school for the Pan Am championship in 2000 and 2001. Baltimore grand master Alex Sherzer, nicknamed "The Surgeon," also came away with honors as the best player on board No. 1 for the tournament, which was held Friday through Monday in Miami.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 6, 1993
LONDON -- So far the run-up has been more Atlantic City than Savoy Hotel.There has been all the hype and hoopla of a heavyweight bout: the mandatory pre-match exchange of insults, the hawking of overpriced tickets and the talk of back-stabbing deals for television coverage.It's not what you would expect from chess. And that's the point. For after the match that begins tomorrow between Gary Kasparov, the world champion since 1985, and Nigel Short, the first British challenger this century, chess may never be the same.
NEWS
September 3, 1993
It sounds like boxing, with rival world governing bodies proclaiming rival champions. Chess has, indeed, much in common with boxing in its shear combative intensity. But just for consumer guidance: The 24-game, 8-week, so-called world championship match between champion Garry Kasparov and challenger Nigel Short sponsored by the Times of London is the real thing.The rival match sponsored by the World Chess Federation (or FIDE), between former world champion Anatoly Karpov andDutch grandmaster Jan Timman, in the Dutch town of Zwolle and in Oman, is the phony.
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