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NEWS
November 20, 2011
LUSBY — Maryland State Police say two people have been injured in a small plane crash at the end of a runway at a Calvert County airport. Trooper First Class E. West of the Prince Frederick barracks says the plane crashed around 6:30 p.m. Sunday at an airport at the Chesapeake Ranch Estates in Lusby. Police say the injuries were not life threatening. The local residents aboard were flying back from Illinois and overshot the runway. The Federal Aviation Administration is going to investigate.
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NEWS
November 20, 2011
LUSBY — Maryland State Police say two people have been injured in a small plane crash at the end of a runway at a Calvert County airport. Trooper First Class E. West of the Prince Frederick barracks says the plane crashed around 6:30 p.m. Sunday at an airport at the Chesapeake Ranch Estates in Lusby. Police say the injuries were not life threatening. The local residents aboard were flying back from Illinois and overshot the runway. The Federal Aviation Administration is going to investigate.
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NEWS
September 22, 2010
The September 15 letter about the removal of fossils from Calvert Cliffs by Phyllis Bonfield and Marcia Seifert (Readers respond) provides a good opportunity to clarify how the Calvert Marine Museum goes about that work. Their concerns are varied and will be addressed in the order in which they appear in their entry. Their first concern was for our safety, which is a legitimate concern and one that we take great care to address. The cliff in the immediate area where this skull was removed is approximately 20 feet high.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
The Obama administration announced Wednesday it is providing $2.4 million to protect endangered Puritan beetles living in cliffs overlooking the Chesapeake Bay. The land acquired in Calvert and Cecil counties with the federal grant boosts the rare insect's chances of survival, officials said. But it also gives a ray of hope to Calvert bayfront homeowners who've been barred from shoring up their crumbling cliffs because of the federally protected beetles on their property. The grant, among $53 million in payouts for endangered species protection nationally, would be paid to six landowners in the two counties for easements guaranteeing that rare beetle habitat on more than 450 acres would remain permanently undisturbed.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 23, 2010
With her house perched atop a 70-foot cliff overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, Marcia Seifert has a view you could die for. She's hoping it won't come to that. When Seifert and her housemate Phyllis Bonfield bought the place at Chesapeake Ranch Estates a decade ago, the cliff was 52 feet from their deck. Now it's only half as far away at best - and about 9 feet in one spot - as bits and chunks of their backyard have tumbled onto the beach below. Their home and nearly a dozen others along this stretch of Calvert County shore are endangered by the crumbling cliffs - and by an extremely rare beetle that lives in them.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
The Obama administration announced Wednesday it is providing $2.4 million to protect endangered Puritan beetles living in cliffs overlooking the Chesapeake Bay. The land acquired in Calvert and Cecil counties with the federal grant boosts the rare insect's chances of survival, officials said. But it also gives a ray of hope to Calvert bayfront homeowners who've been barred from shoring up their crumbling cliffs because of the federally protected beetles on their property. The grant, among $53 million in payouts for endangered species protection nationally, would be paid to six landowners in the two counties for easements guaranteeing that rare beetle habitat on more than 450 acres would remain permanently undisturbed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Erosion along the Chesapeake Bay cliffs in Calvert County has exposed another ancient whale skull, and students from Harrisburg, Pa., were expected to help scientists dig the fossil from the heavy clay sediments. Only a small portion of the back of the skull is visible, said Stephen Godfrey of the Calvert Marine Museum in Solomons. But the Miocene-era fossil is probably 16 million years old, and likely belongs to an extinct family of small whales that swam in what were then Atlantic coastal waters teeming with marine life.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
One person was killed and two others were critically injured when a single-engine Cessna airplane crashed yesterday evening just after takeoff from a private airstrip in Calvert County.A passenger, Douglas Skinner, 38, of Lusby, was pronounced dead on the scene.Witnesses told police that the engine on the 1967 Cessna Model 77 lost power, causing the plane to crash in woods near the airstrip.The pilot, Howard Dennis, 61, of Lusby, and another passenger, Roger Skinner, 49, of Annapolis, were flown by Medstar helicopter to the Washington Hospital Center, where they were listed in critical condition last night.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994
* The Johns Hopkins University announced that Steve H. Hanke, a professor of applied economics, has accepted the sub-Cabinet post of state councilor on monetary and financial issues for Lithuania.* Chesapeake Ranch Water Co. has placed its Plant No. 4 on line to serve the Chesapeake Ranch Estates in Lusby, Calvert County.Trade Organizations* National Stone Association elected Bernard L. Grove, president of Genstar Stone Products of Hunt Valley, chairman.* American Association of Occupational Health Nurses announced that Jane Johnson joined its staff as senior specialist, professional affairs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 8, 2010
A judge has ordered the Calvert Marine Museum to pay a homeowners association $10,001 for improperly removing a 10 million-year-old fossil whale skeleton from communally owned cliffs. After more than eight hours of testimony over two days, Calvert Circuit Judge Warren Krug ordered the museum in Solomons to pay the community $1 for trespassing, and $10,000 for the value of the fossil. But while it was a win for the Chesapeake Ranch Estates property owners' association, its president, John Eney, called the award "an insult," and the victory "hollow."
NEWS
September 22, 2010
The September 15 letter about the removal of fossils from Calvert Cliffs by Phyllis Bonfield and Marcia Seifert (Readers respond) provides a good opportunity to clarify how the Calvert Marine Museum goes about that work. Their concerns are varied and will be addressed in the order in which they appear in their entry. Their first concern was for our safety, which is a legitimate concern and one that we take great care to address. The cliff in the immediate area where this skull was removed is approximately 20 feet high.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Erosion along the Chesapeake Bay cliffs in Calvert County has exposed another ancient whale skull, and students from Harrisburg, Pa., were expected to help scientists dig the fossil from the heavy clay sediments. Only a small portion of the back of the skull is visible, said Stephen Godfrey of the Calvert Marine Museum in Solomons. But the Miocene-era fossil is probably 16 million years old, and likely belongs to an extinct family of small whales that swam in what were then Atlantic coastal waters teeming with marine life.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 23, 2010
With her house perched atop a 70-foot cliff overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, Marcia Seifert has a view you could die for. She's hoping it won't come to that. When Seifert and her housemate Phyllis Bonfield bought the place at Chesapeake Ranch Estates a decade ago, the cliff was 52 feet from their deck. Now it's only half as far away at best - and about 9 feet in one spot - as bits and chunks of their backyard have tumbled onto the beach below. Their home and nearly a dozen others along this stretch of Calvert County shore are endangered by the crumbling cliffs - and by an extremely rare beetle that lives in them.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | April 5, 2010
The discovery of 10 million-year-old whale bones poking out of an eroding cliff face in Calvert County seemed a windfall for science. That's certainly how Shmuel Rotenstreich saw it when the bones appeared almost two years ago below the cliff-top home he shares with his wife, Debora Linzer, in Chesapeake Ranch Estates. So when someone from the Calvert Marine Museum asked if he'd object if the museum's paleontologists excavated the skeleton, Rotenstreich, 63, a computer scientist at George Washington University, did not hesitate.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Three high school students were killed yesterday when their car and a truck collided head-on near the entrance of the community of Chesapeake Ranch Estates, south of Lusby in Calvert County, state police said.Pete Piringer, a state police spokesman, said the car's driver, Michael Keith Vito, 17, and Jacqueline Suzanne Rose, 14, both of Lusby, and Rachel Lynn Thomas, also 14, of Solomons, were pronounced dead at the scene. The victims attended Patuxent High School in Lusby.He said the truck driver, Donald Lee Roberts, 35, also of Lusby, suffered multiple injuries and was airlifted to Prince George's Hospital Shock Trauma Center in Cheverly, where he was in very critical condition last night.
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