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By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
The Chesapeake Music Hall -- the only dinner theater in Annapolis -- will let the curtain fall on its last performance at the end of this month, succumbing to competitive pressure after 15 years. The music hall, just off U.S. 50 a few miles west of the Bay Bridge, has been managed by Sherry Kay Anderson for the past five years after she and her then-husband, Doug Yetter, purchased it in 1995. The facility had two previous owners, both of whom declared bankruptcy. Anderson was unavailable for comment yesterday.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | August 21, 2008
For nearly all of the 15 years of the Chesapeake Music Hall, Annapolis native David Bosley-Reynolds was a bedrock of its productions, starring in everything from Little Shop of Horrors to Oklahoma! Since that venue near the Bay Bridge closed in 2004, Bosley-Reynolds has been flourishing at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Baltimore and Columbia. BroadwayWorld.com voted Bosley-Reynolds the 2007 Actor of the Year, in recognition of his performances in five musicals in 12 months: The Full Monty, Little Shop of Horrors, Titanic the Musical, Fiddler on the Roof and The Sound of Music.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 1997
A review of "A Chorus Line" at Chesapeake Music Hall in the July 24 Arundel edition of The Sun misspelled an actor's name. Her name is Andrea Elward. Also, two characters in the show, Bobby and Mark, became conflated in the editing process.The Sun regrets the errors.Chesapeake Music Hall, which just presented one milestone in musical theater history, "Oklahoma!," has opened another.With "A Chorus Line," the company has moved from the first show to integrate songs into a plot to move the action to a landmark concept musical, with neither story nor stars.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2004
The news that the Chesapeake Music Hall, the dinner theater in Annapolis, will close its doors Dec. 26 is sad on several counts. For the many gifted actors in the area, the Music Hall offered an opportunity to work in the theater and hone their craft in an intimate setting with immediate audience feedback - while being paid for something they love to do. The Music Hall has been a treat for audiences as well. Any dinner theater offers a hybrid experience. Theater food is seldom as good as in a top-notch restaurant, and the performances tend not to be as distinguished as those in a professional theater.
NEWS
By Pat Shipley Hook and Pat Shipley Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1996
The Chesapeake Music Hall's production of "Mame" deserves great acclaim.For a ma-and-pa troupe to come up with a production as good as this one is miraculous. And much of the miracle work is done by Sherry Kay, who not only plays the title role with aplomb but also is co-producer, choreographer and costumer.Kay's Mame shows softness as well as strength. She is gorgeous in stunning gowns and the other costumes, and dance numbers are impressive.Based on the novel "Auntie Mame" by Patrick Dennis, the show tells the story of a 10-year-old boy sent to live with an aunt whose idea of child-rearing includes teaching youngsters to mix martinis and dance the tango in a speakeasy.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and By Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2000
"Annie," the 1977 musical that brought new life to the comic-strip orphan, was off to a resounding start at its opening Friday with a lively overture featuring Chesapeake Music Hall music director-pianist Anita O'Connor accompanied by trumpets, trombones, violins, tuba and drums. A team effort of Broadway's Thomas Meaghan, lyricist-director Martin Charnin and composer Charles Strouse, the show might well be O'Connor's best work at the Music Hall to date. A New York City orphanage early in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration is the setting for "Annie," the tale of a spunky optimist who shares "a hard-knock life" with her fellow orphans.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1997
Chesapeake Music Hall pays tribute Sunday to legendary jazz vocalist Billie Holiday in the fifth of its Jazz At the Music Hall series of concerts.Ronnie Wells, one of the top jazz singers in the Baltimore-Washington area, portrays Holiday. Wells is backed by her husband, Ron Elliston, and his quartet,Wells, who teaches jazz vocal techniques at the University of Maryland, has been a frequent performer at U.S. and international jazz festivals, appearing throughout Europe and North and South America.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 1997
"Fiddler on the Roof," which made its debut on Broadway in 1964, opened last Saturday at Chesapeake Music Hall. Even after 33 years, the musical tale of a humble dairyman's plight as he watches his daughters violate his cherished traditions enchants.Based on Sholom Aleichem's stories, the book is by Joseph Stein, the music by Jerry Bock, the lyrics by Sheldon Harnick and the original choreography by Jerome Robbins. "Fiddler" is set in czarist Russia, but it could be anywhere where old ways yield to new and humor sustains neighbors through trouble.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 2001
Success doesn't seem to have spoiled David B. Reynolds, who recently returned home to Annapolis after playing Daddy Warbucks in a 10-month national tour of the musical Annie. He performed in 70 cities in 32 states. He won critical praise. And he was nominated for a National Broadway Theatre Award, a sort of counterpart to the Tony for touring shows. Despite the acclaim, what Reynolds treasures the most from his months on the road are the new friendships he made and the visits from old friends and relatives who came to see him when the show came to their towns.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
When composer Irving Berlin penned "There's No Business Like Show Business" in 1945, he could hardly have imagined how amazing show business would become 40 years later. In 1984, Dan Coggin, a former Jesuit who designed greeting cards featuring nuns, decided to do a little show based on the adventures of five nuns that he figured would last for four performances. Those four shows expanded to 38 weeks. "Nunsense" has played continuously somewhere from coast to coast and abroad since its debut in New York City.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
The Chesapeake Music Hall - the only dinner theater in Annapolis - will let the curtain fall on its last performance at the end of this month, succumbing to competitive pressure after 15 years. The music hall, just off U.S. 50 a few miles west of the Bay Bridge, has been managed by Sherry Kay Anderson for the past five years after she and her then-husband, Doug Yetter, purchased it in 1995. The facility had two previous owners, both of whom declared bankruptcy. Anderson was unavailable for comment yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 2004
When a theater schedules a two-month run of a classic like Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story, the production has to be of the highest musical caliber because the audience knows this 1957 masterpiece well enough to have formed high expectations. Beyond attaining musical excellence, Chesapeake Music Hall's current production works well on other important levels. Choreographer Sherry Kay Anderson has created her most exciting choreography to date with the best cast in memory. The performers execute it with verve and daring in spectacular lifts, bold athleticism and steamy sensuality.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2004
Three weeks into rehearsals, the Chesapeake Music Hall folks are deep into choreographing the Sharks and Jets rivalry of Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story, opening Saturday for a two-month run at the dinner theater off U.S. 50 on Busch's Frontage Road in Annapolis. Bernstein's 1957 masterpiece looms large with its brilliant score, perfectly wedded lyrics penned by a then-27-year-old Stephen Sondheim and the original choreography of Jerome Robbins. It is the timeless tale of young love and hate that is Romeo and Juliet, transported to 1950s Manhattan and into the racial tensions between street gangs the Puerto Rican Sharks and the Anglo Jets.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
A 1933 movie musical that arrived on Broadway in 1980 directed by the legendary Gower Champion, 42nd Street may have, even then, been a dated show-biz fairytale. Now this tale about Peggy Sawyer - a talented ingenue plucked from the chorus line to become a star after the show's leading lady breaks her ankle - is all-too-familiar. The character of Julian Marsh is the stereotypical hard-boiled, uncompromising Broadway director, and Dorothy Brock is the leading lady of small talent and big ego. Other stock characters include plucky writers Maggie Jones and Bert Barry, along with the lovesick juvenile lead Billy Lawlor, hard-driving dance captain Andy Lee and a bevy of big-hearted chorus girls.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Chesapeake Music Hall's production of Swing premieres the 1999 Broadway musical revue in this area and celebrates the ninth anniversary of the only dinner theater in Annapolis, with Sherry Kay Anderson now in her fifth year as sole owner. Since assuming full responsibility for the theater five years ago, Anderson has enjoyed steadily increasing success. She attributes this success primarily to her business manager, Jami Adkins, who has completed two years in that capacity and has this month also been appointed general manager.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2003
This holiday season Chesapeake Music Hall owner and general manager Sherry Kay Anderson has launched Yuletide Cheers, an original holiday variety show to alternate with the traditional musical version of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Filled with songs, jokes and skits, Yuletide Cheers opened during the weekend and will be presented again Dec. 12-14, Dec. 17 (a matinee), and Dec. 26 and 27. Those wishing to see A Christmas Carol can choose Chesapeake Music Hall's version on alternate weekends or other musical and dramatic versions by Pasadena Theatre Company at Anne Arundel Community College's Humanities Recital Hall, by Colonial Players and by Musical Artists at Chesapeake Arts Center.
NEWS
By Mary C. Johnson and Mary C. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 1999
At Chesapeake Music Hall, a cruise ship is about to dock with colorful passengers, including a couple of escaped convicts, some members of the clergy, debutantes, Wall Street moguls, a nobleman and a nightclub singer turned evangelist with her own set of angels.This 1930s-style luxury love boat, the S.S. American, is anchored to a golden decade of classy tunes."Anything Goes" has an incomparable score, often described as Cole Porter's best. The year was 1934, a time when Broadway was jammed with genius and plots existed only to amuse, not challenge, the audience.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2003
Chesapeake Music Hall's Chicago, which runs through Sept. 13, joins a winning trend that includes last year's Oscar-winning movie and the successful revival that is in its seventh year on Broadway. In 1975 - after years of rights negotiations - director-choreographer Bob Fosse brought his musical-vaudeville concept to Broadway with catchy tunes by John Kander and crisp, satirical lyrics by Fred Ebb. Chicago tells the story of two tough jazz-age chorines who gained celebrity after murdering their lovers.
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