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Chesapeake Biological

BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1996
Allergan Inc., a California-based medical products company, said yesterday it won't renew a production contract with Owings Mills-based Chesapeake Biological Laboratories for a surgical eye lubricant.The contract provided Chesapeake, a manufacturer for the bio-pharmaceutical industry, with between $2 million and $3.5 million annually in sales, depending on demand, said Jack Janssen, Chesapeake's chief financial officer. Chesapeake reported net earnings of $252,000 on $4.7 million in revenues during the first nine months of its fiscalyear.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1995
New positions* Biohabitats Inc. named Karen Pugh director of environmental services for the Towson-based ecological assessment, planning and restorations firm.* Chesapeake Biological Laboratories, a Baltimore biopharmaceuticals manufacturer, appointed Henry Clark senior project manager and Richard Rush as clean room manager.* Prime Employee Assistance Program announced that Paul T. Geckle was selected as director of counseling. Added to the staff were: Roxann S. Karopchinsky, affiliate coordinator, and Stephanie A. Lysakoski, administrative services coordinator.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Canadian drug maker Cangene Corp. has agreed to buy Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc. for $42 million in cash and the assumption of $7.2 million in outstanding debt. The deal comes in the midst of the Baltimore-based drug manufacturing contractor's turnaround after posting a $5.4 million loss in fiscal 1999. An executive with Cangene said the company, based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, expected business to grow with the Baltimore laboratory, which employs 105 at its laboratory. "It expands this area of our business and it gives us a U.S. base of operations," said Alex Glasenberg, Cangene's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
Cove Point LNG terminal to reopenColumbia LNG Corp. said yesterday that it would reopen its liquefied natural gas terminal on the Chesapeake Bay.Company officials said they couldn't say how many jobs would be created when the long-closed, 1,000-acre terminal near Cove Point is restarted in 1994.The $377 million terminal, which opened in 1978 and closed when gasprices fell in 1980, is being maintained by a 16-member maintenance crew, said H. William Chaddock, a spokesman for the terminal and for Wilmington, Del.-based Columbia Gas System Inc.The holding company, which has operated under bankruptcy court protection since July 31, 1991, has a 90 percent stake in the terminal.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
It will be a mixed bag for Maryland's biotechnology industry this year, with a number of companies fighting for life while others come of age. A continued shortage of venture capital and investor nervousness about a sector perceived as risky are expected to keep hindering the fund raising of the state's young biotech companies. On the flip side are companies such as Martek Biosciences Corp. and United Therapeutics Corp., which put their first major products on the U.S. market last year and are nearing profitability for the first time.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1992
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc., a Baltimore-based biotechnology company, reported a 55 percent increase in revenues in the 12 months ended March 31 as it increased its manufacturing capacity. The company reported a net loss of $8,000 in contrast to earnings of $632,000 a year earlier. However, the 1991 earnings included $1.3 million in other income and a gain from the sale of technology and licensing fees.Year ended 03/31/92....Revenue ....... Net....... Share'92... $2,263,463...
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
An article in Monday's editions incorrectly stated the year that Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc. expects its new commercial production facility in Baltimore to be operational. The company expects it to open in early 1998.The Sun regrets the error.In a thriving manufacturing district of South Baltimore, John C. Weiss III surveys construction workers who are transforming a former food distribution warehouse into a state-of-the-art biotechnology production plant.Weiss, president of Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc., expects the facility to provide the manufacturing muscle needed to grab a larger share of the booming business among drug companies hiring outside contractors to make batches of their human and animal products for clinical trials and commercialization.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Envision escaping to a secluded island destination where even your iPhone doesn't roam. Paradise. Images of idyllic, uninhabited beaches and authentic local fare instantly flood your brain. Then you start thinking about long flights, passports and pricey accommodations, and the idea quickly flees your mind. Wait — come back! Did you know that there are exotic islands just off the coast of Maryland? Yes, really. We've uncovered three remote retreats, all within a three-hour drive from Baltimore, where you can unplug, recharge, and, blessedly, not know a soul.
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