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NEWS
By Michael Hild | May 26, 2014
It's no secret that the health of the Chesapeake Bay has been in peril for decades, but ocean acidification poses what may be the greatest threat to the oyster population of the bay. Sadly, for most people this will go unnoticed. It's not like the obvious environmental threat of trees being cut or land being bulldozed. Damage occurring to oysters and other aquatic species can't be seen from a casual observation of the surface, but the threat is real. With water covering so much of the earth's surface it's easy enough for people to think that our waters can handle whatever we pour into them, but nothing could be further from the truth.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay's health remained steady overall last year, despite heavy rains that normally flush pollution into its waters, University of Maryland scientists reported Friday. Declines in Eastern Shore rivers, however, indicated problems with polluted farm runoff there, researchers said. The bay as a whole earned a 45 percent score, a 'C' grade for the second straight year in the annual ecological health checkup performed by the university's Center for Environmental Science.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A bipartisan water transportation bill that would allow Maryland to unload tons of dredging material on Chesapeake Bay islands — an effort that officials say is critical for the port of Baltimore — won broad support in the House of Representatives on Tuesday and is poised for final approval in the Senate. Despite concerns raised by budget watchdog groups and some environmentalists, the $12 billion measure sailed through the politically rancorous House on a 412-4 vote, all but assuring passage in the Senate this week.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
I am 73 years old and have fished and hunted most of my life in and around the Chesapeake Bay. My solution to the rockfish decline would be to do away with the trophy fish season ( "Commission to consider gradual rockfish catch limits," May 13). Every spring, the fish come to the Chesapeake Bay to spawn. They have to run the gauntlet of thousands of charter fishing boats. The females are each carrying thousands of eggs that would be the next generation. Tens of thousands of these females are caught, and that next generation dies with them.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
— Amid warnings that slashing the striped bass catch by a third next year could devastate Chesapeake Bay commercial fishermen, Atlantic states regulators agreed Tuesday to consider reducing the catch more gradually over three years. Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission made so many other changes to a proposal for protecting Maryland's state fish from a troubling decline that they could not finish reviewing it until Wednesday — and likely put off taking final action by three months, until fall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Worried by recent declines in the numbers of Maryland's state fish, Atlantic states fisheries regulators are weighing slashing the annual striped bass catch by up to one-third next year all along the East Coast and in the Chesapeake Bay. The proposal, to be aired Tuesday before the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, comes six months after a study found the striped bass population verging on being overfished and the number of spawning female...
NEWS
May 11, 2014
I'd like to put in my two cents worth on the blue crab situation in the Chesapeake Bay. In his letter, Richard Anderson made a valid point as to the size of the industry and number of people that would be affected ( "Crabbing moratorium isn't the answer," May 7). However, Mr. Anderson should be more aware of the full choice between losing business for one year and losing it forever. One female crab can repopulate the entire species, and they should be protected and banned from harvesting.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | May 8, 2014
The recent bad news on the serious decline in female blue crabs (" May 1) and the subsequent editorial ("Singing the blues," May 5 ) calling for much tighter harvest restrictions should be a wake-up call for all who care about the Chesapeake Bay. The winter dredge survey found one of the lowest crab levels in 25 years of sampling. The harvest in 2013 was the lowest in more than 20 years. At the root of this decline are two factors: overharvest and poor environmental conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
In honor of Old Bay's 75th anniversary, Frederick-based Flying Dog Brewery collaborated with the Maryland seasoning company to create Dead Rise Summer Ale. The seasonal beer is available now until Labor Day.  The beer, which has an alcohol by volume measurement of 5.6 percent, is named after a type of boat designed for travel on the Chesapeake Bay, according to director of communications Erin Weston. A portion of proceeds will be donated to True Blue, a group that advocates on behalf of the Bay's watermen and promotes sustainably harvested local blue crabs.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
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