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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Capt. H. Russell "Russ" Miller III, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot who spent more than four decades guiding ships through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and from Baltimore to Cape Henry, Va., died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime North Baltimore resident was 73. The son of H. Russell Miller Jr., a bay pilot, and Mary Jane Sweitzer Miller, a homemaker, Harry Russell Miller III was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. He was a 1959 graduate of Loyola High School, where he was an outstanding basketball player.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The first large, prefrabricated section of a new traffic tunnel planned in Virginia began floating down the Chesapeake Bay from Baltimore on Tuesday. Only a few feet of the concrete structure showed above the water as three tug boats pushed and pulled it south through the day - another 26 feet submerged below the surface. "It's like an iceberg," said Petty Officer Jonathan Lindberg, a spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard in Baltimore. The Coast Guard escorted the tunnel piece and its tugs from Sparrows Point - where it was built by joint-venture partnership SKW Constructors - to near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The weekend of the Great Chesapeake Bay Swim was better than any holiday for Robert Matysek. The South Carolina man loved to spend time swimming with his family. The 4.4-mile race from Sandy Point State Park to Kent Island was "like Christmas, the Fourth of July and his birthday all wrapped in one," said Matysek's brother Jim. Robert Matysek, who grew up in Baltimore, died Sunday while swimming the event with two of his brothers. He was 58. The state medical examiner has ruled Matysek's death an accidental drowning.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 6, 2014
Et cetera Bayhawks beaten by Rattlers in double OT Attackman Kevin Leveille scored 41/2 minutes into the second overtime as the host Rochester Rattlers handed the Chesapeake Bayhawks an 8-7 loss Thursday night in Major League Lacrosse. A slashing penalty on defenseman Michael Evans (Johns Hopkins, South River) gave Rochester a power play, and rookie attackman Miles Thompson made the extra pass to Leveille, who went one-on-one with goalie Kip Turner (Severn)
FEATURES
By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Anything and everything can be sold online these days from cars to boats including Maryland's gem of the sea, the skipjack. Skipjacks are boats that leap in and out of the water, very much like fishes in the sea. The owner of what's being called one of the few remaining Chesapeake Bay skipjacks has posted an ad on Craigslist to sell the boat for $10,000. The skipjack (not the one pictured above) by the name of Ada Fears was formerly known as Lady Agnes in the late 1970s-1980s when it functioned as a wooden oyster dredger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When Nick Schauman was a toddler, his grandfather, Larry Hunton, taught him how to eat raw oysters. Hunton let his grandson tag along on trips to Lexington Market, where the duo would sit at the raw bar (Schauman sat on top of it) and slurp down oysters "faster than the man could shuck them. " Back then, ordering a dozen oysters simply meant asking for "oysters. " Forty years later, at oyster bars and fishmongers across the region, "boutique" oysters harvested from oyster farms - many of them local - are the norm.
NEWS
By Michael Hild | May 27, 2014
It's no secret that the health of the Chesapeake Bay has been in peril for decades, but ocean acidification poses what may be the greatest threat to the oyster population of the bay. Sadly, for most people this will go unnoticed. It's not like the obvious environmental threat of trees being cut or land being bulldozed. Damage occurring to oysters and other aquatic species can't be seen from a casual observation of the surface, but the threat is real. With water covering so much of the earth's surface it's easy enough for people to think that our waters can handle whatever we pour into them, but nothing could be further from the truth.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | May 27, 2014
Editor: Some of my fondest memories are from my time spent at the Conowingo Dam. As someone that has spent a lot of time at the recreation areas around Conowingo Dam and seen its operation firsthand, a recent Aegis editorial about sedimentation behind the dam got it wrong. The dam is one of the best recreational places in the entire state and is important to the bay's ecological health. The fisherman's wharf is a great spot to observe the many fish species of the Bay, including bass, shad, catfish and walleye.
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