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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski joined with Virginia lawmakers on Friday in requesting the Obama administration step up enforcement of seafood processors that are fraudulently labeling imported crab meat as a product of the Chesapeake Bay. In a letter to President Barack Obama, Mikulski asked that deceptive labeling be included as a focus of a task force created by the White House in June to address illegal fishing. The Maryland Democrat also requested a briefing on the issue from federal agencies.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The concrete oozed rather than poured out of the mixer truck, almost as if reluctant to cover the ground - partly because it won't, entirely. Laborers shoveled pebbly gobs around to form a new sidewalk at a park-and-ride lot in Waysons Corner, one of two where the State Highway Administration is laying "pervious" concrete this summer as a test of its environmental friendliness. Porous paving surfaces have been around for decades, but they're expensive and often didn't work well.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
I am writing in response to Chris Wood's commentary about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Trout, the bay - and your drinking water - at risk in the Senate," June 18). As a girl raised for more than 13 years in Maryland, I grew up boating, crabbing and swimming in the bay and the Severn River, and I am deeply saddened to see how the bay's health has declined since then. The Chesapeake Bay produces 500 million pounds of seafood a year. I have experienced this firsthand when I caught blue crabs for our family dinner many nights.
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
For the past week, Robert Suhay has often imagined sailing the Chesapeake Bay, visualizing various tide patterns, weather conditions and landmarks as he tames the vast body of water. That mental exercise has helped the long-distance sailor keep his confidence high ahead of his attempt at a feat no one has accomplished: Starting today, the 51-year-old from Norfolk, Va., will try to sail the Chesapeake Bay, from Norfolk to Pooles Island near Chestertown and back, alone in a Laser dinghy, a sailboat just under 14 feet long.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2014
While Maryland and most other Chesapeake Bay states are making decent progress in reducing pollution fouling the estuary, Pennsylvania is "substantially off track" and will receive additional federal help and backup action if necessary, the Environmental Protection Agency reported Thursday. In a review of how all six bay states and the District of Columbia are doing in meeting their federally mandated cleanup targets, the EPA downgraded its rating of Pennsylvania's performance after finding the state fell short of meeting most of its pollution reduction targets for 2013 and appears unlikely to achieve its next "milestone" goals unless efforts are intensified.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 26, 2014
Scientists are predicting that the Chesapeake Bay's oxygen-starved "dead zone" will be slightly larger than average this summer. Using computer modeling underwritten by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration , researchers forecast that by next month, nearly 2 cubic miles of bay water will have inadequate oxygen dissolved in it for fish and crabs to thrive. That's roughly 12 percent of the water in the bay and its river tributaries, according to Caroline Wicks of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science . If it follows the normal pattern, the dead zone will grow and intensify until mid-July, then slowly shrink.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
NEWS
By Chris Wood | June 18, 2014
On Monday, the Chesapeake Executive Council signed the Chesapeake Watershed Agreement, a collaborative effort across multiple states to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the celebration of the watershed agreement may be premature. Down the road in Congress there is an effort under way to strip the protections of the Clean Water Act from small headwater streams that feed the bay with cold, clean water. The federal government recently proposed a rule to clarify a politically charged Supreme Court ruling which undermined 30 years of protection of the Clean Water Act for small headwater streams.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
It's one thing to spot your house or hometown from an airplane window. Astronaut Reid Wiseman waved to his parents and their Baltimore County home from hundreds of miles up Sunday. "Been waitin' a while to fly over Maryland," Wiseman said via Twitter early Sunday morning, along with a photo snapped from an International Space Station window clearly showing the Chesapeake Bay. "Hi mom and dad!" Wiseman launched to the space station last month, and has since been posting daily updates, including views of all corners of the globe.
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