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FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
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NEWS
By Marlene A. Condon | August 21, 2014
Some years ago, a colleague told me how, when he was a boy, he would vacation each summer with his parents in Ocean City . He and his mom always looked forward to crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Annapolis, where the sea breezes carried the very essence of this estuary - the smells associated with the vast array of organisms that live and die along the shoreline or in the saltwater. But by the 1980s, Rick noticed that the air surrounding the bridge no longer brought to mind visions of the beach with its myriad periwinkles, sea stars, crabs, shorebirds and seaweed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan doubled down on his efforts to seize the issue of the environment from Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown Tuesday, releasing a video in which he criticizes the O'Malley-Brown administration's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay. In the video, Hogan tells viewers that he would help the bay by "standing up for Maryland" and demanding that New York and Pennsylvania do more to clean up the Susquehanna River,...
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Third in a summer series highlighting dream homes on the water. When Wendy and Alex Haig set out five years ago to find the perfect weekend retreat, they were torn between two different bucolic areas: the rolling horse country of Middleburg, Va., and the wide expanse of the Chesapeake Bay. "The bay very clearly won out," Wendy Haig says. Alex Haig, a lawyer and son of former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, and his wife, a managing partner for a marketing strategy company, wanted a place where they could relax with family and friends and escape from the pressures of Washington.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Federal regulators approved new pollution limits Monday for Maryland's coastal bays aimed at restoring water quality in the shallow lagoons that serve both as playground for Ocean City vacationers and vital habitat for fish and wildlife. Like the Chesapeake Bay, the state's coastal bays suffer from an overdose of nitrogen and phosphorus, which feed algae blooms and stress fish by depleting levels of dissolved oxygen in the water. The bays have been officially recognized as impaired by nutrient pollution since the mid-1990s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
  Governor Martin O'Malley, on behalf of Chesapeake Bay watermen and the True Blue program that promotes Maryland Blue Crab sustainability, accepted a donation of $10,270 from Flying Dog Brewery and Old Bay on Wednesday at the beer company's Frederick taproom.  The money, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston, comes from a portion of proceeds from sales of the Flying Dog Dead Rise beer, which is a collaboration with...
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ari'Yonna Vrathwaite thought she would be a music producer when she grew up, until she started attending a program at the National Aquarium this week. Now, the program that gets students involved in research about the Chesapeake Bay watershed has given Ari'Yonna something to think about: marine biology as a career. "I really like it and I want to come back here again," she said. "We have fun. " Ari'Yonna, 13 and a rising eighth-grader at Commodore John Rogers School in Baltimore, said that so far she liked testing the oxygen level in the water the most.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A few months ago, Gov. Martin O'Malley grew frustrated with state government's lack of creativity on the environment. He challenged his staff to look for new ideas to help the Chesapeake Bay. In response, 80 bright minds from around the state — from precocious high-schoolers to CEOs of technology companies — hunkered down over the weekend at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater for a Chesapeake-oriented marathon programming competition,...
NEWS
July 28, 2014
If all went as planned, Gov. Martin O'Malley spent this past weekend in Iowa, his second trip to the state in a month, which puts him about two visits ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this year. His purpose is hardly a secret as he's considered a likely Democratic candidate, albeit a relatively unknown one, for a 2016 presidential run. Conventional wisdom is that candidates in Iowa say nice things about agriculture. One of the big controversies involving this year's race for a U.S. Senate seat from the Hawkeye state, for instance, was whether the Democratic candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley, threatened a lawsuit when some of his neighbor's organically-raised chickens wandered into his yard.
ENTERTAINMENT
Lori Sears and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The true mettle and value of a musician is how naturally he can perform live. And on stage, Billy Joel is one of pop music's best, a seasoned veteran who's genuine, at ease and funny. There are no elaborate dance numbers, no over-the-top sets, no trickery, explosions or guitar-smashings. It's just Billy and his top-notch, eight-member band on a simple but classy set -- with large video screens and color lighting ... and 20-plus classic rock/pop songs that have made up the soundtrack of many lives.
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