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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
A state task force called Tuesday for tripling the "flush fee" Maryland homeowners pay as a way to help finance an accelerated cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The 28-member task force, appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley to tackle sewage and growth issues, voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the $2.50 monthly bay restoration fee be doubled next year and increased to $7.50 a month by 2015. The fee is levied on water and sewer bills for utility customers, and on property tax bills for homeowners on septic systems.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
A new study shows some Chesapeake Bay rivers have gotten cleaner over the past three decades, while others are getting worse. The analysis, released Wednesday by the U.S. Geological Survey, suggests costly upgrades of sewage plants have helped, scientists say, but it raises questions about the effectiveness of efforts to date to curb polluted runoff, particularly from farms on Maryland's Eastern Shore. "We're going in the wrong direction in some places, and the right direction in others," said William Dennison, vice president for science applications of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
Maryland officials proposed Wednesday tripling the pace of the state's efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, releasing a draft plan that calls for pollution reductions across the landscape, including upgrading more sewage plants and household septic tanks, retrofitting urban and suburban storm drains, and trying new ways to curb farm runoff, including burning poultry manure for energy. The 170-page plan, submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, outlines 75 "options" for reducing nutrient and sediment pollution enough to restore the bay's troubled water quality by the end of this decade — five years ahead of the 2025 bay cleanup deadline the states earlier set for themselves.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Farmland across the Chesapeake Bay region is overloaded with phosphorus, a new study by an environmental group finds, indicating that the bay's waters are being polluted by excessive use of animal manure and sewage sludge as crop fertilizers. In a report released Tuesday, the Environmental Working Group says soil data on file at universities show that in one of five counties in the six-state watershed, more than half of all soil samples tested are overloaded with phosphorus, a nutrient blamed for fouling the bay's waters.
EXPLORE
November 18, 2011
On behalf of the parents of seventh-graders at St. Mark School, I want to thank science teacher Sandy Ward for securing a grant enabling our students to experience an incredible day of learning on the Chesapeake Bay. Our students participated in an on-the-water exercise in order to apply their in-class learning in a real world context. The St. Mark staff, along with guides at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Philip Merrill Center in Annapolis, provided a full day of invaluable activities for our children.
NEWS
January 12, 2010
The Sun's January 11 op-ed accurately describes the Department of the Environment's focus on enforcing environmental laws that, despite resource constraints, resulted in a 34 percent increase in enforcement actions in 2008 ("Tougher policing of water quality needed"). Our annual report will soon detail an additional 7 percent increase in 2009. But while there are certainly differences of opinion, the claim that "nobody is doing anything" to clean up the Chesapeake Bay is simply incorrect.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
Two weeks after Tropical Storm Lee flushed millions of tons of mud into the Chesapeake Bay, state and federal officials announced Tuesday they are launching a study of how to protect the estuary from sediment and other pollutants building up behind dams on the Susquehanna River. Experts from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Maryland departments of environment and natural resources and the Nature Conservancy, a Washington-based conservation group, will team up for the $1.4 million, three-year evaluation of how to deal with sediment accumulating upriver from the Conowingo Dam and three other hydroelectric facilities on the Susquehanna.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2011
A number of Maryland authorities are searching the Chesapeake Bay for a boater who was reported missing early Saturday, according to Natural Resources Police. Sgt. Art Windemuth, spokesman for the Maryland Natural Resources Police, said around 1:30 a.m., boater Charles Martin Carlson, III reported that his sole passenger, 40-year-old Mark Allen Harvison, of Pasadena, was missing from his 30-foot, Rampage fishing boat. He went missing between the Severn River and Thomas Point Lighthouse.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
In his recent State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley touted his accomplishments in Chesapeake Bay restoration. On closer examination, the record reveals that his claims were misstatements, at best. The truth is that Maryland's portion of the bay remains severely degraded. Oyster, shad and soft clam fisheries have collapsed, bay grasses declined in 2012 to the lowest levels since 1986, and dead zones proliferate. Did the governor intentionally ignore the increasing reports of people with serious flesh-eating skin infections threatening their limbs and lives because they swam or fished in Maryland's waters?
EXPLORE
By Benn Ray | July 18, 2011
Whew. Let me tell ya, things in Hampden are really heating up this summer. Ha! I don't know why it's fun writing in clichés, but it is. I mean it's also true. I'm writing this at the tail end of a mini-heat wave (do people just not use that phrase anymore?) and I'm trying to edit down a long list of awesome upcoming events just to fit my column size. The Pavement to Prairie Party kicks off July 25 at the ACCE School in the Robert Poole complex, 1300 W. 36th St. More than 300 volunteers, including 200 from the Vans Warped Tour, will be pulling up almost an acre of asphalt and converting the area to turf and conservation landscaping.
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