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Chesapeake Bay

NEWS
July 20, 2011
What exactly is "stupefying" about turning the care of the Chesapeake Bay over to the state which has the greatest stake in having it be clean and functioning ("No defender of the bay," July 18)? Or was your editorial more about political candidates The Sun's editorial board wishes to support and less about issues? David Riley
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NEWS
June 6, 2010
As any parent knows, poor midterm grades present a dilemma. Is it better to be encouraging and positive, or to get outraged and impose punishment? Lean too far one way and you're a softie, the other and you may face only resistance and obstinacy. Such is the case with the two-year milestones set last year toward the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay by the states whose rivers drain into the estuary and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. At the midway point, the results are a mixed bag at best.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
In Kevin Philpy's recent commentary ("Taking care of God's Chesapeake Bay," June 19), he laid out the faith basis for stormwater fees and the responsibilities congregations share with fellow neighbors and landowners to clean up pollution generated by our parking lots, roofs and other impervious surfaces. In addition to the national faith groups Mr. Philpy named who are dedicated to caring for the earth, we would like to add ours, Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC). IPC is a Chesapeake Bay watershed-wide nonprofit that helps faith communities become better stewards of all natural life systems within the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Having moved to Maryland two years ago, I've learned something about its people: Marylanders stand up for the Chesapeake Bay. A healthy bay underlies the regional economy and is a fundamental part of our rich heritage. Four decades ago, Congress took action to protect places like the bay with the passage of the hallmark Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. These laws protect the bay for crabbers, oystermen, sailors and swimmers alike, while also protecting characteristic Maryland wildlife like the piping plover and the Maryland darter.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
One byproduct of the rainy weather over the past month is that jellyfish, the bothersome stinging creatures found in the middle Chesapeake Bay this time of year, are being pushed southward and upriver in bay tributaries. In recent years, we have seen the opposite -- jellyfish making their way up into the Baltimore harbor as summer drought has increased salinity in the bay. The creatures known as  Chrysaora quinquecirrha  can only survive in water measuring 10-16 practical salinity units, said Raleigh Hood, a professor with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Add a Super Bowl ring to the list of things floating in the Chesapeake Bay. The ring belongs to a receptionist for the Ravens named Toni Lekas -- everyone involved with a winning team gets a ring, not just the players.  The person who lost the ring is her boyfriend, Chuck Lykes. Florists, take note of his name, because Lykes will likely be sending Lekas a lot of bouquets to make up for this one. Lykes was wearing the ring at a party on a boat in Middle River in August after Lekas had gone home, according to The Caw blog on baltimoreravens.com.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Unless I completely misinterpret this story ("Fatter folks, sicker bay," April 20), which is easy to do any time a "lefty" talks, it is a complete load of garbage! When the writer suggests that the health of the Chesapeake Bay is affected by the obesity of those who live near it, I have to respond that this is just another desperate attempt to lay blame on people, which usually is a precursor to another invasive law and a further erosion of freedom and liberty. He writes about a book he is reading by medical researchers and associates their findings with meanderings of his own mental deficiency and says, "It's intriguing to compare graphs these [Bay health]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
Once again, Gov. Martin O'Malley has tried to show that he can be a player on the national stage and a potential presidential candidate. At a recent "Taste of Maryland" dinner, Mr. O'Malley tried to show Republican voters that he can move to the right by evoking memories of President George H.W. Bush's "read my lips" promise not to raise taxes and by threatening to veto the Poultry Fair Share Act, which would require large poultry producers to help...
NEWS
By Larry Simns | April 7, 2011
Over the past decade, Maryland's commercial watermen, our families and communities have slowly but steadily been reaching a turning point in our lives. With a polluted Chesapeake Bay, uncertain seafood stocks, rising costs of doing business and unpredictable fisheries management, commercial watermen around the state are facing a critical choice about the future. We can choose to follow the path we are on, filled with instability and insecurity, or we can choose a road of sustainability and promise.
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