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Chesapeake Bay

NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 10, 2012
I always worry, as I dust off the syllabus and prepare my fall course at Salisbury University - will the final exam show up? Storms along their 4,000-mile migration corridor or conditions on their sub-Arctic nesting grounds might delay the wild swans. They seldom arrive where I take my students until just before the semester ends. I designed "Topics in Chesapeake Bay" to be different. The university affords me the luxury of doing it as an inspirational condiment atop the required courses.
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NEWS
October 31, 2011
The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is on the threshold of making a game-changing decision: Whether to allow the menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay to be fished to extinction, or to act decisively to save this vital mid-chain food fish. Overfishing the Chesapeake Bay menhaden is exactly the kind of situation ASMFC is empowered to regulate by reducing commercial fishing takes or imposing moratoriums. The decimation of the bay's menhaden population to historic lows deals a severe blow to the area's entire symbiotic oceanic food chain.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Understanding Marlene A. Condon's plea for us all to take responsibility to save our Chesapeake Bay ( "If you break it, you pay for it," Aug. 22) gives us overall plans to save the bay. Saving the bay under Ms. Condon's plans would simultaneously create green jobs, save species, clean the air and water, greatly beautify the landscape while reducing global warming through the trees, shrubs and flowers replacing much of the "largest crop grown" in the Chesapeake watershed - you guessed it, law and turf, which pollutes storm water runoff like pavement does and with it, pesticides, fertilizers and the exhausts of countless mowers and weed trimmers all adding to the slow death of our bay. Oh, and the bees, our pollinators, could thrive as well if we would follow the vision offered in this excellent commentary.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
As a concerned mother and environmentalist, I want to thank The Sun for its recent article on pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Report finds widespread contaminants in the bay," Jan. 22). Meaningful efforts to significantly improve the bay must address pesticide runoff. The Pesticide Use Reporting Bill would require certified pesticide and fertilizer applicators to report usage data to a centralized database. Centralizing such information would benefit public agencies in their response to fish kills, dead zones and human health outbreaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Maryland Seafood Marketing Program, an effort of the state's Department of Natural Resources, has started up its fourth season of chef education tours.  The tours offer culinary professionals an opportunity to see Chesapeake seafood products up close, and to harvest them alongside the watermen who derive their livelihood on the bay. In its first three years, more than 400 chefs have enrolled in the education tours, on which they've explored...
NEWS
February 18, 2014
In his recent State of the State address, Gov. Martin O'Malley touted his accomplishments in Chesapeake Bay restoration. On closer examination, the record reveals that his claims were misstatements, at best. The truth is that Maryland's portion of the bay remains severely degraded. Oyster, shad, and soft clam fisheries have collapsed, bay grasses declined in 2012 to the lowest levels since 1986 and dead zones proliferate. Did Governor O'Malley intentionally ignore the increasing reports of people with serious flesh-eating skin infections threatening their limbs and lives because they swam or fished in Maryland's waters?
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 14, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay's water quality has taken a turn for the better, state officials report, as the oxygen-starved 'dead zone' where fish, crabs and shellfish struggle to breathe has shrunk to its second smallest since 1985. Water samples taken in early August found that 11.8 percent of the Maryland portion of the bay has poor oxygen levels, nearly half the long-term average for this time of year, according to a report posted online by the state Department of Natural Resources . That's a turnaround from July, when the volume of water with low oxygen levels was above average.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 31, 2013
You're never far from water in Maryland, with the Chesapeake Bay nearly bisecting the state. Yet for all that, there's a surprising shortage of places where people can launch a boat, cast a fishing line or wade in. A coalition of recreational enthusiasts, small businesses, local governments and civic and nonprofit groups hopes to change that.  They've launched a " Freedom to Float " campaign, seeking to capitalize on the release this week of...
NEWS
July 20, 2011
What exactly is "stupefying" about turning the care of the Chesapeake Bay over to the state which has the greatest stake in having it be clean and functioning ("No defender of the bay," July 18)? Or was your editorial more about political candidates The Sun's editorial board wishes to support and less about issues? David Riley
Baltimore Sun Articles
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