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Chesapeake Bay Watershed

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NEWS
April 16, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- Virginia has lost 699,000 acres in the Chesapeake Bay watershed to development since 1982, more than any other bay state. New federal figures show that 699,000 acres of Virginia land that drains into the Chesapeake were developed in the years from 1982 to 1997. Pennsylvania was next with 619,000 acres, and Maryland lost 376,000 acres in the same period. As a percentage of total acres, Virginia is in the middle. Maryland lost 7.8 percent of its watershed to development, compared with 6.5 percent in Virginia and 4.6 percent in Pennsylvania.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 3, 2013
What if they held an environmental crisis and no one cared? What if a law moving through Congress would significantly harm clean water, open space, the Chesapeake Bay? You'd hear the alarms, strong and clear, from the largest national groups to the smallest Chesapeake organizations. But you won't in this case, because this law is "only" about population - about significantly increasing the number of people who will be living in the United States and around the Chesapeake. The law, which has passed the U.S. Senate and gone to the House with broad, bipartisan backing, is a comprehensive reform of our outdated immigration laws.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
Heather O'Donnell of Bowie writes: "I've read many places that the watershed for the Chesapeake Bay goes all the way up to near Cooperstown in New York. Yet, when I'm driving up I-95 toward New Jersey, I see a big billboard that tells me I'm leaving the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Who is right?" Tom Zolper of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation replies: "The sign is correct. The Chesapeake Bay watershed encompasses parts of six states (Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia)
NEWS
By Leah Davies and Allison Wilson | July 14, 2011
Every time it rains, buildings in the Chesapeake Bay watershed contribute to the bay's pollution. The culprit is stormwater runoff. Our impervious, hardscaped environment acts as a funnel for contaminants that speed down the sewer system into streams and lakes, eventually emptying into the Chesapeake. There just isn't enough greenery in the built environment to act as a natural filter for all the runoff. An important part of the path toward a healthier bay is to let the bay "build" the houses of the watershed - to design and construct bay-friendly homes.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
Outdoors Maryland Saturday, 5:30 p.m. MPT "Oysters." At the turn of the 20th century, oyster harvests from the Chesapeake Bay numbering in the millions of bushels were commonplace. Last year, harvests approached just 23,000 bushels. Oysters are responsible for filtering the Chesapeake's water. This segment explores the latest efforts of scientists and policymakers as they attempt to determine whether or not to release the Asian oyster, keep the native Chesapeake oyster in place, or wait until more studies are completed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 6, 2005
A new program aims to match local governments so they draw expertise from one another about how best to protect the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. The Chesapeake Bay Program, a federal-state partnership that guides bay restoration efforts, recently launched the Peer Match program to share information among communities. Christopher Conner, a spokesman for the program, said the idea was to get counties, cities and towns that have adopted bay-friendly programs to assist other communities.
NEWS
September 28, 2005
THE ISSUE An Anne Arundel County hearing officer heard last week the case of Daryl C. Wagner, who built a 3,500-square-foot home five years ago on Little Island without county approval. Wagner is seeking retroactive variances for the house on the nearly 2-acre island. County zoning officials are backing the request on the grounds that the house was built farther from the shoreline than the structure that had stood there. But the county law office has filed suit, seeking to tear down Wagner's buildings, which are located within 1,000 feet of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a state-regulated critical area.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals will convene Wednesday the first of what could be several hearings concerning Daryl C. Wagner, the homebuilder who built a more than 5,000-square-foot house without permits on a small Magothy River isle known as Little Island. The state Critical Area Commission, along with two environmental groups -- the Magothy River Association and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation -- filed an appeal after a county official granted retroactive variances in October allowing Wagner to keep his home.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
If you're going to an outdoors function with a group of nature-type scientists, do not assume they have any influence over the conditions in the immediate area. That was a take-away message Thursday morning as about 100 members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and 50 volunteers from Harford County and the Department of Natural Resources gathered for some do-gooding at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center in Abingdon. Slabs of clouds the color of fireplace ashes had dumped buckets of rain in the pre-dawn hours.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
Now I know how those White House party crashers felt. I received an e-mail Wednesday addressed to "Dear Chesapeake Bay colleague" inviting me to listen in on a "special briefing for the watermen and recreational fishing communities on a new federal strategy for protecting and restoring the Chesapeake Bay watershed." Earlier in the day, the Obama administration announced a "we really mean it this time" plan to restore the bay that involves tons of federal tough love and forces the six states in the watershed to break a sweat on enacting and enforcing stricter pollution and development laws.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
Heather O'Donnell of Bowie writes: "I've read many places that the watershed for the Chesapeake Bay goes all the way up to near Cooperstown in New York. Yet, when I'm driving up I-95 toward New Jersey, I see a big billboard that tells me I'm leaving the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Who is right?" Tom Zolper of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation replies: "The sign is correct. The Chesapeake Bay watershed encompasses parts of six states (Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
If you're going to an outdoors function with a group of nature-type scientists, do not assume they have any influence over the conditions in the immediate area. That was a take-away message Thursday morning as about 100 members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and 50 volunteers from Harford County and the Department of Natural Resources gathered for some do-gooding at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center in Abingdon. Slabs of clouds the color of fireplace ashes had dumped buckets of rain in the pre-dawn hours.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals will convene Wednesday the first of what could be several hearings concerning Daryl C. Wagner, the homebuilder who built a more than 5,000-square-foot house without permits on a small Magothy River isle known as Little Island. The state Critical Area Commission, along with two environmental groups -- the Magothy River Association and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation -- filed an appeal after a county official granted retroactive variances in October allowing Wagner to keep his home.
NEWS
September 28, 2005
THE ISSUE An Anne Arundel County hearing officer heard last week the case of Daryl C. Wagner, who built a 3,500-square-foot home five years ago on Little Island without county approval. Wagner is seeking retroactive variances for the house on the nearly 2-acre island. County zoning officials are backing the request on the grounds that the house was built farther from the shoreline than the structure that had stood there. But the county law office has filed suit, seeking to tear down Wagner's buildings, which are located within 1,000 feet of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a state-regulated critical area.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Outdoors Maryland Tomorrow, 5:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. MPT "Planet Chesapeake." Using data from the Earth Observing System of satellites, scientists at the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are compiling data on topics that directly influence the climate and ecology of the Chesapeake Bay watershed: sea surface temperature, deep ocean temperature, rainfall, hurricane anatomy, sea level rise and an array of other subjects. This segment looks at the Chesapeake on a planetary scale.
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