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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 4, 1996
The Chesapeake Bay Trust awarded three grants last week for environmental projects in Anne Arundel County.The Maryland Ornithological Society and Anne Arundel Bird Club will share $1,450 for a "Birds and the Bay" program for county schools; the Alliance for Community Education will receive $1,000 toward a conference on land use and transportation in the county; and Folger McKinsey Elementary School in Severna Park will get $1,390 for field trips with the...
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | August 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has appointed County Executive Robert R. Neall to the Chesapeake Bay Trust, a non-profit agency that finances private bay cleanup efforts.As a member of the trust's 19-member board, Neall will help award grants to groups undertaking projects to help the bay. The General Assembly created the trust in 1985 to solicit private donations and involve the public in the bay restoration.Nine Anne Arundel County organizations received $62,000 in May. Grants to county groups included $20,000 to Maryland Save Our Streams to help Glen Burnie residents restore Sawmill Creek, and $1,000 to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to plant trees andshrubs in the Back Creek Wildlife and Nature Preserve.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
When Alexandra Adkins looked out the window of her Columbia townhouse at the nearby stream and took walks along its banks with her dog, Titan, she didn't like what she saw. The streambed was eroded, the banks looked like scoured cliffs with roots of leaning trees dangling above the water, and muddy channels sliced into the stream. That was last winter, as Adkins took walks as a break from studying for the Maryland bar exam. Once she took the exam in February - and passed - she turned her attention to the nameless stream that's part of the headwaters of Wilde Lake, seeking information about possible restoration.
NEWS
By Andrew Schaefer and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporter | February 24, 2007
At Sparks Elementary School, "Sister Earth" teaches students about the environment while wearing a long flowered skirt, a wig and, when not in bare feet, flip-flops. The teacher behind the costume, Elizabeth "Pokey" Fair, also dresses in a lab coat and goggles - and a cowboy hat. Some days, she's joined by another teacher who is decked out as a surfer. "I like to do characters with the kids," Fair said. "It's something to catch their attention." Yesterday, Fair, 36, was recognized as one of the Chesapeake Bay Trust's teachers of the year.
NEWS
January 24, 1992
10 a.m.: Senate convenes, State House.11 a.m.: House convenes, State House.1 p.m.: Senate Budget and Taxation Committee hears testimony on legislation to extend the current income tax checkoff for endangered species and the Chesapeake Bay Trust, Room 100, Senate Office Building.There are 74 days remaining in the 1992 General Assembly session.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
Under overcast skies with light winds and water temperatures in the 70s, 644 swimmers plunged into the bay last weekend for the Toyota Great Chesa peake Bay Swim. The 4.4-mile route, from Sandy Point State Park to Steven sville, raises money for the March of Dimes and the Chesapeake Bay Trust.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
To help mark the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, tree plantings are scheduled this weekend, and also in November, in the Loch Raven and Prettyboy watersheds. Both the Gunpowder Valley Conservancy and the Prettyboy Watershed Alliance will each host plantings on Saturday, Oct. 20, and the Prettyboy group will also conduct a planting on Saturday, Nov. 10.  The new trees are intended to help protect both the Loch Raven and Prettyboy reservoirs from runoff, and will also absorb pollutants that would otherwise enter the water supply. Together, the two reservoirs provide drinking water to 1.8 million people in the region every day. The Prettyboy Watershed Alliance received two grants from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, totaling $5,666, which will be used to plant 500 trees.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | January 17, 1994
Hashawha Environmental Center has been awarded a $1,000 grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust to add a handicapped-accessible ramp to the boardwalk surrounding restored wetlands at the center.The grant was one of 85 awarded around the state for community restoration and education projects. The Hashawha project is part of a public education program for the wetlands."The area was probably a wetlands before the beginning of modern agriculture," said Loren Lustig, Hashawha's director. "The restoration project was designed by the Soil Conservation District."
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
The Belair Edison neighborhood was awarded $31,100 to develop a design for a heavily traveled portion of Erdman Avenue to green the street and control polluted runoff. The neighborhood will work with partners, including business owners, residents and environmental groups on the plan for the grant, administered through the Chesapeake Bay Trust, an independent grant-making organization chartered by the state. The program, paid for by the Trust and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was created to support street greening projects by urban communities.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
It was an opportunity no kid could pass up: a rare permission to spray-paint school property - with grown-ups watching, no less. Students at Bryant Woods Elementary weren't creating graffiti. Instead, they stenciled "DON'T DUMP, CHESAPEAKE BAY DRAINAGE" in green lettering on a white background atop a storm drain - part of the school's efforts to educate Howard County residents about ways to protect the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary. Bryant Woods' entire student body, as well as teachers, administrators and guests, gathered at one of the schools concrete-and-metal drains last week and cheered as a group of fifth-graders kicked off the Columbia school's Storm Drain Stenciling Project.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
On good days, the Tiber Hudson tributary of the Patapsco is a pleasant part of the scenery in Historic Ellicott City as it flows through a stone channel by Tonge Row, beneath Tiber Alley alongside Main Street and past the B&O Railroad Museum before it spills into the river. It's a troubled waterway nonetheless, not considered able to support life, paved over in spots and surrounded by lots of asphalt. The urban and suburban surroundings that drain into the Tiber Hudson - its "watershed" - will be inspected early in December by teams of consultants and volunteers as part of a continuing private, county and state effort to improve the streams and rivers that ultimately flow into the Chesapeake Bay. Focusing on areas some distance from its channel, the crew of about 15 will spend four days driving around, looking for possible pollution sources and ways to better protect the Tiber Hudson.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
To help mark the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, tree plantings are scheduled this weekend, and also in November, in the Loch Raven and Prettyboy watersheds. Both the Gunpowder Valley Conservancy and the Prettyboy Watershed Alliance will each host plantings on Saturday, Oct. 20, and the Prettyboy group will also conduct a planting on Saturday, Nov. 10.  The new trees are intended to help protect both the Loch Raven and Prettyboy reservoirs from runoff, and will also absorb pollutants that would otherwise enter the water supply. Together, the two reservoirs provide drinking water to 1.8 million people in the region every day. The Prettyboy Watershed Alliance received two grants from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, totaling $5,666, which will be used to plant 500 trees.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 28, 2012
Two Baltimore groups were among 10 around the Chesapeake Bay receiving $376,000 Wednesday to "green" their communities while also providing job training. Belair-Edison Neighborhoods Inc. and Southeast Community Development Corp. were awarded a combined $102,000 under the Environmental Protection Agency 's " Green Streets-Green Jobs-Green Towns " initiative. Under the program, local governments and nonprofit organizations can get grants for projects involving tree-plantings and other measures to reduce storm-water washing into local waters.  Assistance is also provided to train people in constructing such projects.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 12, 2011
In the holiday spirit of giving, grants were doled out today to support environmental causes in Maryland and nationwide. First, the National Environmental Education Foundation announced a $3 million grant from Toyota Motor Sales USA  to help community groups that support parks and other public lands.  The announcement was made at Fort McHenry here in Baltimore, with top federal environmental officials in attendance and students...
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By Steve Jones | October 11, 2011
They've grown up during an era of unprecedented interest in the environment, and on Oct. 7, students from Pot Spring Elementary School and Dulaney High School turned their knowledge, and public service intentions, into action. Upperclassmen in John Enders' horticulture class at Dulaney joined first- and third-graders from Pot Spring to plant more than 30 trees on the fringe of a forested area between the two schools. Along with other recently planted trees and the long grasses that surround them, the new trees will act as a buffer for a stream that runs through the woods behind Pot Spring.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 28, 2012
Two Baltimore groups were among 10 around the Chesapeake Bay receiving $376,000 Wednesday to "green" their communities while also providing job training. Belair-Edison Neighborhoods Inc. and Southeast Community Development Corp. were awarded a combined $102,000 under the Environmental Protection Agency 's " Green Streets-Green Jobs-Green Towns " initiative. Under the program, local governments and nonprofit organizations can get grants for projects involving tree-plantings and other measures to reduce storm-water washing into local waters.  Assistance is also provided to train people in constructing such projects.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
The Belair Edison neighborhood was awarded $31,100 to develop a design for a heavily traveled portion of Erdman Avenue to green the street and control polluted runoff. The neighborhood will work with partners, including business owners, residents and environmental groups on the plan for the grant, administered through the Chesapeake Bay Trust, an independent grant-making organization chartered by the state. The program, paid for by the Trust and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was created to support street greening projects by urban communities.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Full of hope for a greener new year, dozens of neighbors near Patterson Park turned out Saturday morning to wrestle 27 saplings into newly cut holes in the sidewalk along a nearly treeless block of rowhouses. "One, two, three, go!" called out Matt Dodd, as he and two other residents — including 7-year-old Jordan Anderson — rolled the hefty root ball of a 7-foot Armstrong maple into its freshly dug hole in the 100 block of N. Curley St. Community leaders said it was the opening salvo in a campaign to plant more than 100 new trees in the coming year in an East Baltimore neighborhood that's long on pavement and short on greenery.
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