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By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1999
"THIS WILL FORCE us to rethink how we grow or expand to question growth as a measure of prosperity. It raises the long term issue of limits to growth in all sectors. "Yet, if we do not accept this challenge, all of the gains that have been made in restoring the Bay will disappear " You seldom find such refreshing and challenging vision in government documents. But the above-referenced "Holding the Line on Nutrient Pollution," a report to the federal-state Chesapeake Bay Program, is a milestone.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 22, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay's underwater grasses decreased 7 percent in 2010, according to a report released Thursday by the Chesapeake Bay Program. The aerial survey by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science found grasses covered 79,675 acres of the bay and tidal rivers, down from 85,914 acres in 2009. Despite the decline, scientists said, it is the third-highest baywide acreage estimate since 1984. The grasses are a measure of bay health because the plants serve as food and habitat, absorb excess nutrients and reduce shoreline erosion, the program said.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
To view the latest measure of the state of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, the Chesapeake Bay Program's "Bay Barometer," is not unlike receiving the interim report card of a chronically underachieving student. Whatever modest progress is reported, it's difficult to get past the miserably low overall grades. This sort of science-based snapshot may be useful, but it's also a bit bracing - or "sobering" as some environmentalists have described it. Less than one-third of the Chesapeake Bay's tidal areas meet federally-approved water quality standards while three-quarters of 92 tidal areas tested positive for chemical contaminants, and underwater grasses continue to decline.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
More than 70 percent of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams are falling short of water quality goals, according to a report released Tuesday. The "Bay Barometer" report is issued annually by the Chesapeake Bay Program, the federal-state partnership that oversees restoration efforts for the bay. This year's report includes a new category that combines water quality readings such as dissolved oxygen and clarity. The bay and its tributaries are broken into 291 sections, of which only 29 percent had an adequate score.
NEWS
March 20, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay Program is inviting the public to comment on draft goals and outcomes for bay restoration efforts. The bay program says public feedback will be used to finalize the goals and outcomes, which will be paired with the final bay restoration strategy to be released by May 12. The federal agency is developing a restoration strategy in response to an executive order last year by President Barack Obama. A draft strategy released in November includes expanded regulation of large-scale animal farms and urban-suburban storm-water runoff, but leaves room for states to cut pollution before expansion of federal regulation.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
Underwater grasses made robust gains in the Chesapeake Bay last year, scientists report, reaching their greatest extent in seven years. But the submerged vegetation, which provides shelter and food for fish and crabs and helps clear the water, is still less than half what it once was. Reporting on the results of the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual aerial survey, scientists said bay grasses spread across 12 percent more of the Chesapeake's bottom, covering...
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
A bit of good news - the vast, grassy Susquehanna Flats apparently weathered Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee in good shape. Scientists conducting their annual checkup of the bay's underwater grasses found the lush bed at the mouth of the Susquehanna River largely intact when they examined aerial photos taken in late November. Researchers had feared for upper bay grasses, and the Flats especially, after seeing the heavy rains and flooding produced by Irene in late August followed by Lee in early September.  After Lee in particular, the raging Susquehanna flushed an estimated four million tons of sediment out into the bay from behind Conowingo Dam.  Some predicted the storms would deal a serious setback to the bay's health, just as it was showing some signs of improvement.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay and its 64,000-square-mile watershed made modest improvements during the past year, according to a report card on the bay's health released Wednesday. But those who contributed to the assessment and other observers say that after 25 years of efforts, they were disappointed by the pace of gains. About 45 percent of goals were met in 2009, an increase over the year before, according to the Bay Barometer. The annual report is produced by the Chesapeake Bay Program, a coalition of federal, state and nonprofit groups leading restoration of the nation's largest estuary.
NEWS
By Nicholas DiPasquale | February 24, 2013
For 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay Program - a partnership including the six bay states, the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies - has been measuring and assessing the bay's health and working to restore the ecosystem. In many of those years, the health findings were troubling. This year, as we release our annual Bay Barometer summarizing the bay's condition and our restoration progress, there remain many results related to water quality that reinforce our need for continued action.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
More than 70 percent of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams are falling short of water quality goals, according to a report released Tuesday. The "Bay Barometer" report is issued annually by the Chesapeake Bay Program, the federal-state partnership that oversees restoration efforts for the bay. This year's report includes a new category that combines water quality readings such as dissolved oxygen and clarity. The bay and its tributaries are broken into 291 sections, of which only 29 percent had an adequate score.
NEWS
By Nicholas DiPasquale | February 24, 2013
For 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay Program - a partnership including the six bay states, the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies - has been measuring and assessing the bay's health and working to restore the ecosystem. In many of those years, the health findings were troubling. This year, as we release our annual Bay Barometer summarizing the bay's condition and our restoration progress, there remain many results related to water quality that reinforce our need for continued action.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
The protective underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay have dropped to their lowest levels since 2006, according to the latest report from Maryland and Virginia scientists. The scientists from the Chesapeake Bay Program, a regional partnership, view the grasses as a key measure of bay health because they provide shelter for fish and crabs, protect the shoreline and keep the water clear. The program measures the grasses annually from the Susquehanna Flats to the mouth of the bay, as well as those in the system's rivers.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | January 4, 2012
What can we say about the half-acre of stream valley forest that developer William Tarbutton recently, blatantly bulldozed near Federalsburg on Maryland's Eastern Shore? He will likely be fined by the Maryland Department of the Environment, which has recently proposed $240,000 in fines for previous violations by the Easton developer. He might get sued by adjoining landowner Charles Long, whose forest was part of what Mr. Tarbutton knocked down - "but I don't know if it's worth the lawyers' fees," Mr. Long said.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
A bit of good news - the vast, grassy Susquehanna Flats apparently weathered Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee in good shape. Scientists conducting their annual checkup of the bay's underwater grasses found the lush bed at the mouth of the Susquehanna River largely intact when they examined aerial photos taken in late November. Researchers had feared for upper bay grasses, and the Flats especially, after seeing the heavy rains and flooding produced by Irene in late August followed by Lee in early September.  After Lee in particular, the raging Susquehanna flushed an estimated four million tons of sediment out into the bay from behind Conowingo Dam.  Some predicted the storms would deal a serious setback to the bay's health, just as it was showing some signs of improvement.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
The latest study on the health of the Chesapeake Bay has some encouraging news - offering signs that years of pollution-fighting efforts are having a positive effect. Now, it remains to be seen whether Congress is paying attention and can refrain from pulling the proverbial rug out from under the bay's cleanup campaign. First the good news. A new study released by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has found that efforts by Maryland and other states to reduce the flow of fertilizer, animal waste and other pollutants into the Chesapeake Bay has had a positive effect on the oxygen-deprived "dead zones" of the bay. The largest such dead zone - near the Chesapeake's deep water channel - appears to have peaked in the 1980s and declined ever since, according to the study published this month.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
The protective underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay have dropped to their lowest levels since 2006, according to the latest report from Maryland and Virginia scientists. The scientists from the Chesapeake Bay Program, a regional partnership, view the grasses as a key measure of bay health because they provide shelter for fish and crabs, protect the shoreline and keep the water clear. The program measures the grasses annually from the Susquehanna Flats to the mouth of the bay, as well as those in the system's rivers.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 22, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay's underwater grasses decreased 7 percent in 2010, according to a report released Thursday by the Chesapeake Bay Program. The aerial survey by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science found grasses covered 79,675 acres of the bay and tidal rivers, down from 85,914 acres in 2009. Despite the decline, scientists said, it is the third-highest baywide acreage estimate since 1984. The grasses are a measure of bay health because the plants serve as food and habitat, absorb excess nutrients and reduce shoreline erosion, the program said.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
Underwater grasses made robust gains in the Chesapeake Bay last year, scientists report, reaching their greatest extent in seven years. But the submerged vegetation, which provides shelter and food for fish and crabs and helps clear the water, is still less than half what it once was. Reporting on the results of the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual aerial survey, scientists said bay grasses spread across 12 percent more of the Chesapeake's bottom, covering...
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