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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Environmental groups are appealing a federal judge's ruling that the owners of the Sparrows Point steel mill need only do a limited search for offshore pollution from the plant. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and its legal partners, including the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, have filed notice with the U.S. District Court in Baltimore of their intention to appeal a decision by Judge J. Frederick Motz accepting a plan by the steel plant's current owner, RG Steel, to test for contamination no more than 50 feet into the Patapsco River and Bear Creek.
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By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
More than three decades ago, 22-year-old Annapolis native Andy Teeling climbed aboard his 16-foot dory and embarked on an ambitious journey to circumnavigate the 450-mile coastline of the Delmarva Peninsula in a rowboat. After two months of rowing under the summer sun, and with his first semester of college beckoning him back to shore, Teeling's journey was stalled in Chincoteague, Va., 150 miles short of his goal. This week Teeling, 35 years later at age 57, finished the adventure.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Organizers of a charity race on the Bay Bridge next year have eliminated the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a potential partner because the group opposes a proposed waterfront housing development on Kent Island. Sparrow Rogers of Chesapeake Bay Run LLC said last week that run organizers had withdrawn an invitation to the foundation to help stage the 10-kilometer run next November because people "at high levels in Queen Anne's County" said they would be upset if the environmental advocacy group were allowed to participate.
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By Michael Dresser | August 12, 2014
Discussing the weather might once have been an alternative to arguing about politics, but not in Maryland in 2014. Before the front that brought torrential rains to Maryland Tuesday had even passed, it became the basis for an attack by Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan on Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown. Precipitation had already been at the center of this year's campaign as a result of Republican opposition to the storm water cleanup fees they have dubbed "the rain tax. " On Tuesday evening, after a day that brought flash flooding around the state and broke rainfall records at BWI, the Hogan campaign released a statement charging that the downpour underscored the O'Malley-Brown administration's failure to protect the Chesapeake Bay from " catastrophic releases of polluted sediment from the long-neglected control reservoirs, or ponds, above the Conowingo Dam. " Hogan was referring to a long-running controversy over how much hard the buildup of decades of sediment behind the dam on the Susquehanna River poses to the bay. Hogan considers it the No. 1 threat to the bay -- a view not shared by the Army Corps of Engineers and many environmentalists.
NEWS
May 28, 1992
For those concerned about the plight of the Chesapeake Bay, it is a jolt to realize that the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is only 25 years old. It is hard to imagine how the bay could have survived the onslaught of pollution and degradation without its pioneering work.No discussion of the bay's past, its present or its future can be conducted without heavy reliance on the foundation's research. Thousands have been introduced to the bay's wonders, its resources and its troubles by foundation lecturers or field trips.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 31, 2004
One of Maryland's most well-known environmental activists, J. Charles Fox, abruptly resigned as a vice president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Fox, 43, resigned Thursday from one of the region's largest and most influential environmental groups. His resignation took effect yesterday, foundation spokesman John Surrick said. "We're not going to comment on his reasons for resigning," Surrick said. Fox was not available for comment. "This is a tremendous loss for CBF," Chuck Foster, the foundation's chief of staff, said in a statement to employees yesterday.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
Maryland's largest environmental group and one of Baltimore's oldest civil rights organizations have formed an unusual alliance, pledging to work together to improve job opportunities for urban youth, reduce toxic pollution and help revitalize the city.The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Baltimore Urban League were to announce their agreement and a five-year joint strategy at a press conference today."It is so apparent that to save the bay you've got to save the cities," William C. Baker, president of the Annapolis-based foundation, said yesterday.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 13, 2013
Ahoy! There's a new admiral on the Chesapeake Bay. John Page Williams, senior naturalist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation , earned the honorific rank Tuesday night in Annapolis in recognition of his 40-year career teaching and writing about the bay. John R. Griffin, chief of staff for Gov. Martin O'Malley and former natural resources secretary, presented Williams with a framed certificate proclaiming him the newest "Admiral of the Bay....
NEWS
August 14, 1997
HOW FAR will a teacher go to find new approaches to help students learn? We know that many educators will dig into their own pockets to spend money on classroom materials and other resources they believe will make a positive difference for their school children.But the distance some teachers travel for the sake of education can be counted in miles -- nautical miles.In this worthwhile program, teachers from Maryland, Delaware and Virginia have gone aboard canoes for weeklong programs this summer to learn about ecosystems and aquatic life in the Chesapeake Bay. Conducted every summer by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the program focuses on the bay and offers insight on what its neighbors can do to save our treasured estuary.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
With half its goal of $44 million pledged, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation has announced its most ambitious capital campaign, designed to help revive life in the bay "to historic levels of health and productivity."The drive, the Covenant to Save Chesapeake Bay, aims to produce funds mostly for "projects that focus on restoring habitat, reducing toxic pollution and increasing fisheries," said Michael Shultz, vice president for public affairs.The goal is one of the largest capital amounts, if not the largest, set by any regional environmental group in the country, Shultz said.
NEWS
By Stephen Schaff | August 4, 2014
The new Waters of the U.S. rule is designed to clarify that the Clean Water Act protects a variety of important waters, including seasonal and rain-dependent streams, as well as wetlands near rivers and streams. Getting it implemented will depend on support from our members of Congress for the agencies' proposal. It'll affect a lot more than your favorite crab cakes - it could save your job. Think clean water only counts when it comes out of your tap or when you dive in at the beach?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2014
A couple of years ago, the governor of Maryland stood on a dock on South River, a bushel of steamed crabs at his feet, telling everyone it was OK to eat Chesapeake blue crabs again - sort of like the mayor in "Jaws" telling everyone it was OK to go back in the water. "I am glad to report that the population of the blue crab is now at a 19-year high," the governor said in April 2012. There was so much excitement about the comeback of the blue crab that the state launched a "True Blue" marketing campaign, identifying and promoting restaurants and markets selling Chesapeake lump.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2014
Baltimore has joined with other major U.S. cities in defending the federal government's authority to impose a "pollution diet" on the Chesapeake Bay. New York City, with sign-ons from Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and San Francisco, filed a "friend-of-the-court" brief Monday in federal appeals court in a case challenging the Environmental Protection Agency 's imposition of bay cleanup goals on Maryland and the other five states...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Federally funded efforts to curtail farm pollution of the Chesapeake Bay are falling short, and recent spending cuts by Congress cast doubt on the efforts' ultimate success, an environmental group said Monday. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation said farmers planted only a fraction of the stream-side trees last year than they should have to meet goals set for creating forested buffers to reduce polluted runoff from fields, feedlots and pastures. Maryland and the other five states in the bay watershed have pledged collectively to establish 185,000 acres of new forested buffers on farmland by 2025, the Annapolis-based group said.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
More than 70 percent of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams are falling short of water quality goals, according to a report released Tuesday. The "Bay Barometer" report is issued annually by the Chesapeake Bay Program, the federal-state partnership that oversees restoration efforts for the bay. This year's report includes a new category that combines water quality readings such as dissolved oxygen and clarity. The bay and its tributaries are broken into 291 sections, of which only 29 percent had an adequate score.
NEWS
December 5, 1997
EASTPORT, an Annapolis community that has thrived by virtue of its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay, does not want the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a neighbor. The Eastport Civic Association has gone to court to prevent the conversion of a 33,000-square-foot warehouse into an office building to house the environmental organization. The community group's effort may prove counterproductive.At issue is Annapolis' Maritime Zoning and Economic Strategy. It was adopted more than a decade ago. The ordinance created four zoning districts to protect views of the water and limit shoreline uses to maritime-related activities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 16, 2003
T. Marshall Duer Jr., an avid sailor who channeled his love of the Chesapeake Bay into the founding of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and other environmental and historical organizations, died of prostate cancer Friday at his home in White Stone on Virginia's Northern Neck. The longtime Ruxton resident was 90. Mr. Duer who was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville, attended the old Marston School. He later transferred to Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., from which he graduated in 1931.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
The comments from Rich Shannahan that you ran on November 16, "Excluding Bay Foundation is outrageous" were outrageously inaccurate. K. Hovnanian Homes played no role whatsoever in the Chesapeake Bay Foundation being excluded as a sponsor of the Bay Run by race organizers. We learned about the issue when it was reported in The Sun. K. Hovnanian would never object to any organization participating in a fundraising event that supports the bay, even if it opposes our Four Seasons community.
NEWS
November 16, 2013
The exclusion of the esteemed and widely respected Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a potential partner for the Chesapeake Bay Run is truly outrageous and arrogant ("Chesapeake Bay Foundation excluded from bridge run," Nov. 13). If Sparrow Rogers of Chesapeake Bay Run LLC and K. Hovnanian Homes are going to try to use the beautiful Chesapeake Bay Bridge, the bridge that belongs to the people of Maryland, for political purposes - to browbeat the citizens of Maryland into approving that huge, sprawling development on Kent Island - approval for the event by the Maryland Transportation Authority should be denied!
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