Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChesapeake Bay
IN THE NEWS

Chesapeake Bay

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 24, 2012
While I agree that chemicals and manure are major problems contributing to Chesapeake Bay pollution, there are two additional concerns that should be addressed. One is the pollution associated with power mowers, leaf blowers and edgers. Most or these gasoline engines have little or no pollution controls. The second is the increasing population in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. During my lifetime, the population in Maryland has more than tripled, and homes and highways continue to reduce the efficiency of trees in cleansing the environment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Reginald V. Truitt was a zoologist at the University of Maryland and a pioneer in scientific studies to better understand and protect the precious resources of the Chesapeake Bay. In 1925, Truitt founded the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory in Solomons, which became the foundation for what is now the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). It is truly fitting that UMCES has a prestigious environmental award in his name, but what would Truitt think of the most recent award winner?
Advertisement
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | April 27, 2014
The spring recreational fishing season for Maryland's iconic striped bass, better known as rockfish, began last weekend and runs through May 15 with a limit of one fish per person per day and a minimum size of 28 inches. Striped bass fishing until May 15 is restricted to Chesapeake Bay waters from the Brewerton Channel to the Virginia line, including Tangier and Pocomoke sounds. Fishing is not allowed in any other bays, tributaries, creeks and rivers in order to avoid disrupting spawning activity.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
NEWS
May 26, 2011
My first visit to the Chesapeake Bay was disappointing to say the least. As a place that receives millions of visitors a year, it shouldn't be too much to expect clean water. Roughly 20 percent of all wetlands may no longer be protected by the Clean Water Act. We need EPA director Lisa Jackson and the EPA to act now to protect America's waterways. Muhammad Yasin, Reston, Va.
NEWS
January 20, 2011
It defies all logic that a farm with 100 acres could harm the Chesapeake Bay more than a shopping center, apartment complex and attendant parking lots on 100 acres could do. Back when the bay was clean, we had more farms than we do now, and we had many less people with their cars, sewage treatment plants and garbage. Are farmers singled out as evil bay polluters ( "Faulty stewardship," Jan. 13) because there are fewer of us? We are good stewards of the land, and fortunately we have the voice of the American Farm Bureau to speak for us. Milly B. Welsh, Davidsonville
NEWS
June 29, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay and the rich habitat it contains provide outstanding sporting opportunities for the region's millions of hunters, anglers and birders. As a Maryland resident sportsman, conservationist and professional wildlife biologist, I support the Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act, which is currently before Congress. The legislation would improve water quality and wildlife habitat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and ensure that generations of sportsmen and other outdoors enthusiasts will continue to enjoy the region's wildlife-oriented traditions.
NEWS
July 9, 2011
We applaud Sen. Ben Cardin's courageous opposition to the pesticides bill now before the U.S. Senate ("Cardin opposes break on pesticide," July 4). This proposal would cancel the Environmental Protection Agency's permit program limiting the amount and types of pollutants discharged into waterways and threaten the Chesapeake Bay. Without definite limits on hazardous pesticides, it will be impossible to keep Maryland's streams and rivers free of toxic chemicals. Without the permit program, 95 percent of our streams will continue to show pesticide pollution, and the majority of our aquatic communities will be exposed to complex mixtures of chemical contaminants that have the potential for harm.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Without doubt, car dealerships and big box store owners in overwhelming numbers will be voting for Harford County Executive David Craig in the 2014 gubernatorial Republican primary - all 238 of them, more or less. But running as the anti-Chesapeake Bay candidate, as Mr. Craig seems to be positioning himself to do, will be as popular as running against Santa Claus on Christmas Eve. His recent statements regarding environmental policy are about as reckless and irresponsible as any I have seen reported in over 60 years of reading The Sun ( "GOP's Craig calls for environmental rollback," Sept.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Hardly a month goes by that The Sun does not further document how Chesapeake Bay pollution is eroding the livelihoods of our watermen. In a cynical moment, I once wrote in my book, "Bay Country," of a day when "we will memorialize the vanished watermen in a Colonial Williamsburg - Watermens' World, we'd call it ... tourists could view actors tonging Fiberglas oysters from the comfort of underwater viewing lounges.... " Now I'm encouraged to report that the Chesapeake Conservancy has an innovative program up and running that trains real life watermen to share their skills with tourists, supplementing their incomes while we work to restore the Chesapeake's seafood bounty.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
I'm left speechless after reading your recent editorial on the Conowingo Dam ( "Damning the dam," Sept. 1). It would seem to me that some Chesapeake Bay cleanup lobbyist wrote this article. Of course we have to continue our efforts to restore the bay. Of course overflowing sewers and stormwater run-off continue to damage the environment, and of course they must be stopped. But your writer is either ignorant of history or too young to remember tropical storm Agnes and how it virtually wiped out the grasses in the bay, causing damage we are still feeling more than 40 years later.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
There weren't any keepers yet, but the fish were definitely biting for Willie Edwards one day last week as he trolled along the edge of the Susquehanna Flats. The 72-year-old fisherman from North East said he'd caught "a lot of little rock," or striped bass. The Flats - a vast, grass-covered shoal at the mouth of the Susquehanna River - are a magnet for fish and the anglers who pursue them. But they're also a symbol to scientists of the Chesapeake Bay's resilience, and of its ability to rebound, if given a chance, from decades of pollution and periodic battering by storms.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Understanding Marlene A. Condon's plea for us all to take responsibility to save our Chesapeake Bay ( "If you break it, you pay for it," Aug. 22) gives us overall plans to save the bay. Saving the bay under Ms. Condon's plans would simultaneously create green jobs, save species, clean the air and water, greatly beautify the landscape while reducing global warming through the trees, shrubs and flowers replacing much of the "largest crop grown" in the Chesapeake watershed - you guessed it, law and turf, which pollutes storm water runoff like pavement does and with it, pesticides, fertilizers and the exhausts of countless mowers and weed trimmers all adding to the slow death of our bay. Oh, and the bees, our pollinators, could thrive as well if we would follow the vision offered in this excellent commentary.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
NEWS
By Marlene A. Condon | August 21, 2014
Some years ago, a colleague told me how, when he was a boy, he would vacation each summer with his parents in Ocean City . He and his mom always looked forward to crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Annapolis, where the sea breezes carried the very essence of this estuary - the smells associated with the vast array of organisms that live and die along the shoreline or in the saltwater. But by the 1980s, Rick noticed that the air surrounding the bridge no longer brought to mind visions of the beach with its myriad periwinkles, sea stars, crabs, shorebirds and seaweed.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
As highlighted in "A Victory for the Chesapeake" (Sept. 19), Pennsylvania Judge Sylvia Rambo recently issued a thoughtful ruling in defense of the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to enforce the Clean Water Act. After a challenge by the Farm Bureau and others, the federal court affirmed that the EPA has the authority to issue pollution limits based on sound science and can continue doing its job of protecting the environment. This is good news for those of us who enjoy clean water for recreational purposes, but even more importantly, this is great news for those of us who depend on our water resources for food and commodities.
NEWS
December 10, 2009
Since 2007, the Department of the Environment has made enforcing environmental laws one of our top three priorities - along with increasing transparency and improving our fiscal structure. Progress includes enacting standard operating procedures to correct enforcement delays, increasing enforcement activity 34 percent in fiscal year 2008 and securing two of the highest penalties ever collected for state environmental violations. We did this without additional inspectors or resources. Over the past three years, due to the national economic recession and necessary state budget reductions, MDE reduced its budget by $27 million - equivalent to about a third of our annual operating budget.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan doubled down on his efforts to seize the issue of the environment from Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown Tuesday, releasing a video in which he criticizes the O'Malley-Brown administration's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay. In the video, Hogan tells viewers that he would help the bay by "standing up for Maryland" and demanding that New York and Pennsylvania do more to clean up the Susquehanna River,...
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Third in a summer series highlighting dream homes on the water. When Wendy and Alex Haig set out five years ago to find the perfect weekend retreat, they were torn between two different bucolic areas: the rolling horse country of Middleburg, Va., and the wide expanse of the Chesapeake Bay. "The bay very clearly won out," Wendy Haig says. Alex Haig, a lawyer and son of former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, and his wife, a managing partner for a marketing strategy company, wanted a place where they could relax with family and friends and escape from the pressures of Washington.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.