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Cheryl Miller

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SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 20, 1995
After nabbing Danny Ainge on Sunday, Turner Sports yesterday announced that it has added Cheryl Miller to its team of reporters/analysts.Miller, 31, a four-time All-America basketball player at Southern California, will be a part of TNT and TBS' NBA coverage, as well as TNT's NFL telecasts, and is expected to play a role on the Goodwill Games telecasts, as she did in 1994, when she was the women's basketball analyst for TBS.Miller, who retired from basketball...
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Just looking at Sean Elliott's feathery jump shot, you wouldn't know that he hasn't played competitive basketball in nearly nine months. The ball spins gently off the fingertips, rotating softly through the air before landing in the basket, barely touching anything but the bottom of the net. Just looking at Elliott's smooth face, you couldn't guess what the San Antonio Spurs forward has endured since helping his team win the NBA championship last season....
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SPORTS
By Earl Gustkey and Earl Gustkey,Los Angeles Times | March 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Southern California women's coach Cheryl Miller, already a controversial figure in her field, now has now been accused of purloining mail.Apparently a scouting report on Miller's team fell into the wrong hands last week -- Miller's.Here's how it happened:Debbie Ayres, the women's coach at Cal State Fullerton, was asked by her former boss, Tennessee coach Pat Summitt, to scout USC's first two NCAA tournament games in Los Angeles, against Portland and George Washington.Ayres hand-wrote a five-page report on Miller's team and took it with her to Fayetteville, Ark., site of last week's Mideast NCAA regional tournament.
FEATURES
April 15, 1998
Get the Points; Game TimeCheryl Miller is the coach of the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury. She is also one of the greatest college basketball players of all time. Between 1983 and 1986, Cheryl scored 3,018 points for the University of Southern California. She scored 673 points as a freshman and 726 points as a sophomore. She poured in 805 points as a junior. How many points did Cheryl score as a senior?Answer: 814 Centerfielder Brady Anderson helped the Baltimore Orioles win the American League Eastern Division in 1997.
FEATURES
April 15, 1998
Get the Points; Game TimeCheryl Miller is the coach of the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury. She is also one of the greatest college basketball players of all time. Between 1983 and 1986, Cheryl scored 3,018 points for the University of Southern California. She scored 673 points as a freshman and 726 points as a sophomore. She poured in 805 points as a junior. How many points did Cheryl score as a senior?Answer: 814 Centerfielder Brady Anderson helped the Baltimore Orioles win the American League Eastern Division in 1997.
NEWS
December 24, 1990
Jacob Joseph Lerner, 74, a Baltimore Sun truck driver for 35 years who excelled in the art of ceramics, died of leukemia Dec. 10 at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mr. Lerner began his career selling newspapers on the streets of East Baltimore as a boy.Born in Highlandtown, he was educated in city public schools before being drafted into the Army during World War II. During the war he was stationed in Alaska with a medical corps and was commended for rescuing troops after a transport ship sank off Anchorage.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Maryland's Malissa Boles and Katrina Colleton can be excused for feeling a bit star-struck as they practice for the U.S. Olympic trials in women's basketball.Over on court 1 is Nancy Lieberman-Cline, a former Olympian and four-time All-American, juking a competitor out of her socks.On court 3 is Cheryl Miller, another former Olympian and four-time All-American, providing the dictionary definition of denial defense.On court 2, former Georgia All-American and two-time Olympian Teresa Edwards, widely acclaimed as the best women's player in the world, sweeps in for a layup.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 4, 1991
This weekend, some of the diversity brought to CBS Sports by its $1 billion contract with the National Collegiate Athletic Association will be on display. The network paid that money to get exclusive rights to the NCAA men's basketball tournament, but the NCAA left a basketful of other sports on CBS' doorstep along with the receipt.Tomorrow at 1 p.m., CBS (channels 11, 9) presents a women's basketball doubleheader -- Purdue-Auburn and Georgia-Iowa -- from Iowa's Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
The good news for women's basketball this week is that Sheryl Swoopes, who carried Texas Tech to a national championship last year and propelled the sport to higher visibility, will be in Richmond, Va., for this year's Final Four.The bad news for women's basketball, and by extension, CBS, which will carry Saturday's semifinals and Sunday's championship game, is that Swoopes, who graduated last year, will only be signing autographs.For the women's game, which has neither the tradition nor the following of the men's tournament, a highly visible player -- such as Swoopes or former Southern California great Cheryl Miller -- or a dominant team, like traditional power Tennessee, is easy to sell to a national viewing audience.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | August 22, 1994
OK, so no one will confuse Channel 2's coverage of the Canadian Football League with the way ABC, NBC or Fox carries the NFL. There are simply too many wild camera shots and sound glitches, and too much Tom Matte, for that.But those things aside, WMAR did a pretty good job on Saturday night's Baltimore-Toronto game, given resources that can't compare to a network's.The station provided consistently good camera angles, informational slow-motion replays, particularly on cornerback Irvin Smith's fourth-quarter sideline interception, and up-to-the-minute sideline updates with reporter Keith Mills, who got injured quarterback Tracy Ham as soon as he returned to the field.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- Within the broadcasting industry, the pending battle between ESPNEWS and CNN/SI for a place in the hearts and cable boxes of sports fans is an intriguing one, because it matches two behemoths, Walt Disney and Time-Warner.But, on a more subtle level, the marriage between Sports Illustrated, the most venerable of all sports magazines, and CNN, the world's most established all-news network, has its own intrigue.For many, especially within print circles, there is wonder about whether, in the course of expanding the brand of Sports Illustrated, the magazine's editors and writers might be giving its readers short shrift.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 20, 1995
After nabbing Danny Ainge on Sunday, Turner Sports yesterday announced that it has added Cheryl Miller to its team of reporters/analysts.Miller, 31, a four-time All-America basketball player at Southern California, will be a part of TNT and TBS' NBA coverage, as well as TNT's NFL telecasts, and is expected to play a role on the Goodwill Games telecasts, as she did in 1994, when she was the women's basketball analyst for TBS.Miller, who retired from basketball...
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | August 22, 1994
OK, so no one will confuse Channel 2's coverage of the Canadian Football League with the way ABC, NBC or Fox carries the NFL. There are simply too many wild camera shots and sound glitches, and too much Tom Matte, for that.But those things aside, WMAR did a pretty good job on Saturday night's Baltimore-Toronto game, given resources that can't compare to a network's.The station provided consistently good camera angles, informational slow-motion replays, particularly on cornerback Irvin Smith's fourth-quarter sideline interception, and up-to-the-minute sideline updates with reporter Keith Mills, who got injured quarterback Tracy Ham as soon as he returned to the field.
SPORTS
By Jesse Barkin and Jesse Barkin,Los Angeles Daily News | May 31, 1994
INDIANAPOLIS -- Reggie Miller of the Indiana Pacers admitted what everyone else knew all along. He talks, therefore he is.After spending the first three games of the NBA Eastern Conference finals disguised as some silent and polite impostor, Miller opened his mouth and enlarged his game yesterday at Market Square Arena. Sticking jumpers in the faces of the New York Knicks, then telling them how he did it, the All-Star guard scored 11 of his 31 points in the final 5:18 to lead the Pacers to an 83-77 victory and tie their best-of-seven series at two wins apiece.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
The good news for women's basketball this week is that Sheryl Swoopes, who carried Texas Tech to a national championship last year and propelled the sport to higher visibility, will be in Richmond, Va., for this year's Final Four.The bad news for women's basketball, and by extension, CBS, which will carry Saturday's semifinals and Sunday's championship game, is that Swoopes, who graduated last year, will only be signing autographs.For the women's game, which has neither the tradition nor the following of the men's tournament, a highly visible player -- such as Swoopes or former Southern California great Cheryl Miller -- or a dominant team, like traditional power Tennessee, is easy to sell to a national viewing audience.
SPORTS
By Earl Gustkey and Earl Gustkey,Los Angeles Times | March 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Southern California women's coach Cheryl Miller, already a controversial figure in her field, now has now been accused of purloining mail.Apparently a scouting report on Miller's team fell into the wrong hands last week -- Miller's.Here's how it happened:Debbie Ayres, the women's coach at Cal State Fullerton, was asked by her former boss, Tennessee coach Pat Summitt, to scout USC's first two NCAA tournament games in Los Angeles, against Portland and George Washington.Ayres hand-wrote a five-page report on Miller's team and took it with her to Fayetteville, Ark., site of last week's Mideast NCAA regional tournament.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- Within the broadcasting industry, the pending battle between ESPNEWS and CNN/SI for a place in the hearts and cable boxes of sports fans is an intriguing one, because it matches two behemoths, Walt Disney and Time-Warner.But, on a more subtle level, the marriage between Sports Illustrated, the most venerable of all sports magazines, and CNN, the world's most established all-news network, has its own intrigue.For many, especially within print circles, there is wonder about whether, in the course of expanding the brand of Sports Illustrated, the magazine's editors and writers might be giving its readers short shrift.
SPORTS
By Jesse Barkin and Jesse Barkin,Los Angeles Daily News | May 31, 1994
INDIANAPOLIS -- Reggie Miller of the Indiana Pacers admitted what everyone else knew all along. He talks, therefore he is.After spending the first three games of the NBA Eastern Conference finals disguised as some silent and polite impostor, Miller opened his mouth and enlarged his game yesterday at Market Square Arena. Sticking jumpers in the faces of the New York Knicks, then telling them how he did it, the All-Star guard scored 11 of his 31 points in the final 5:18 to lead the Pacers to an 83-77 victory and tie their best-of-seven series at two wins apiece.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Maryland's Malissa Boles and Katrina Colleton can be excused for feeling a bit star-struck as they practice for the U.S. Olympic trials in women's basketball.Over on court 1 is Nancy Lieberman-Cline, a former Olympian and four-time All-American, juking a competitor out of her socks.On court 3 is Cheryl Miller, another former Olympian and four-time All-American, providing the dictionary definition of denial defense.On court 2, former Georgia All-American and two-time Olympian Teresa Edwards, widely acclaimed as the best women's player in the world, sweeps in for a layup.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 4, 1991
This weekend, some of the diversity brought to CBS Sports by its $1 billion contract with the National Collegiate Athletic Association will be on display. The network paid that money to get exclusive rights to the NCAA men's basketball tournament, but the NCAA left a basketful of other sports on CBS' doorstep along with the receipt.Tomorrow at 1 p.m., CBS (channels 11, 9) presents a women's basketball doubleheader -- Purdue-Auburn and Georgia-Iowa -- from Iowa's Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City.
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