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By From staff reports | April 21, 1991
This year's American pie is sour cherry. Diane Cordial baked the winning Ohio sour cherry pie that won the American Pie Celebration contest recently in New Orleans and took home a silver rolling pin, $7,000 worth of kitchen equipment and $3,000 in cash.Her pie, a filling of tart red cherries wrapped in a double crust, included a pastry map of Ohio inserted into the top crust, with a cherry marking Columbus -- the state capital. Ms. Cordial, 50, a registered nurse and mother of four from Powell, Ohio, has been baking pies for 40 years.
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SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | October 2, 2008
Announcer Matt Striker said that Jack Swagger looked like a cross between Gary Busey and Barry Windham. I was thinking Busey and Jani Lane, the former lead singer of hair metal band Warrant ("Cherry Pie"). Jani Lane, of course, is no relation to Lenny Lane, Swagger's opponent last night. I almost didn't recognize Lenny, who, as Striker pointed out, now bears a resemblance to '80s mid-carder Buck Zumhoffe. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
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SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | October 2, 2008
Announcer Matt Striker said that Jack Swagger looked like a cross between Gary Busey and Barry Windham. I was thinking Busey and Jani Lane, the former lead singer of hair metal band Warrant ("Cherry Pie"). Jani Lane, of course, is no relation to Lenny Lane, Swagger's opponent last night. I almost didn't recognize Lenny, who, as Striker pointed out, now bears a resemblance to '80s mid-carder Buck Zumhoffe. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | February 13, 2003
We cannot tell a lie. The National Museum of Dentistry is celebrating George Washington's birthday on Sunday. Honest. The museum will have on display an original set of Washington's dentures and will offer tours of the George Washington Gallery, which features artifacts and information relating to the first president's dental history. Actor Dean Malissa of the American Historical Theatre portrays the founding father in an interactive performance, "Coming of Age Along the Potomac," at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Also, visitors are invited to try on Colonial tri-cornered hats, hear period music, participate in scavenger hunts, visit a Colonial play station and, of course, have some cherry pie (and cherry soda)
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | June 17, 1997
OVER 200 YEARS Baltimore has seen a lot of changes, and in your own time you have seen some of them. Social scientists talk about demographics and the industrial base and blah, blah, blah. But if you want to measure change in Baltimore, think about what used to be delivered to your door. That is change you can connect to.For more than 100 years and until the mid-1970s, the Rice's bakery truck came to your door. This uniformed, one-man catering service brought a tray full of still-warm baked goods: Vienna bread, Parker House rolls, cherry pie -- and the big favorite year after year, according to Emory Rice Jr., Louisiana Ring cake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | February 13, 2003
We cannot tell a lie. The National Museum of Dentistry is celebrating George Washington's birthday on Sunday. Honest. The museum will have on display an original set of Washington's dentures and will offer tours of the George Washington Gallery, which features artifacts and information relating to the first president's dental history. Actor Dean Malissa of the American Historical Theatre portrays the founding father in an interactive performance, "Coming of Age Along the Potomac," at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Also, visitors are invited to try on Colonial tri-cornered hats, hear period music, participate in scavenger hunts, visit a Colonial play station and, of course, have some cherry pie (and cherry soda)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1990
RAGGED GLORYNeil Young (Reprise 26315)If ever an album lived up to its title, it's Neil Young's gleefully noisy "Ragged Glory." A masterful exercise in garage rock grunge, it's packed to the rafters with growling guitars, exhilarating bursts of feedback and the sort of loose-limbed arrangements that suggest a good deal more empathy than rehearsal. But Young balances his sonic excesses with some of his strongest melodies in years, from the edgy harmonies of "Mansion On the Hill" to the crusty innocence of "Mother Earth (Natural Anthem)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
RIGHT PLACE, wrong meal. That was our take on 49 West, a coffeehouse/wine bar/gallery on West Street in Annapolis that does well in each of those roles, but exceeds its grasp at dinner. On previous, unofficial lunchtime visits to this cozy, 19th-century storefront, we've had nothing but good food served in two rooms filled with paintings and books. But on the visit for this review, we ordered from the side of the menu available only after 6 p.m. and were disappointed to find that the quality was not the same.
FEATURES
By Carol Cutler and Carol Cutler,Copley News Service | March 11, 1992
Perhaps being a young country propels us to do things at a fast pace. We walk faster than Europeans do. We finish a meal in record time instead of slowly savoring it. We also constantly change our views about current customs and fashions.No one has done a better job of capturing our forever fluctuating attitudes than Gerry Schremp in her new book "Kitchen Culture -- Fifty Years of Food Fads -- From Spam to Spa Cuisine" (Pharos Books). This exhaustively researched book is a true road map of where we've been and where we are.Fifty years is not all that long in the course of history, even culinary history, but the procession of 40 plus recipes sprinkled throughout "Kitchen Culture" illustrates how much we've zigzagged.
FEATURES
By Jessica Benjamin and Jessica Benjamin,Contributing Writer | August 5, 1992
Calling Marilyn Mueller just a candy maker is like calling Michelangelo someone who dabbled at drawing. She likes to think of herself as a "chocolate artist" and her confections as sculpture.Ms. Mueller, of Riva, has created such masterpieces as a chocolate bird's nest filled with fresh berries and an edible centerpiece of leaves and twigs and spun sugar lilies. Her specialty is truffles served in a be-ribboned box made entirely of chocolate -- including the bow.You don't have to be a denizen of the Walters Art Gallery to appreciate Ms. Mueller's edible objets d'art -- you just have to love chocolate.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
Their hair was big, their music was loud and their lyrics were oozing with double-entendres. They've come to be known as "hair bands," and in the late '80s and early '90s, their pop-metal sound, consisting mainly of infectious party anthems and melodic "power ballads," flooded the airwaves of radio and MTV and sold millions of albums. Hair bands, so dubbed because of their ridiculously puffy, hair sprayed coiffures, celebrated the excesses of rock stardom. Their outlandish personas were defined by a life of fame, money, groupies and hangovers.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
On the second Sunday of Advent, dressed in royal purple and standing at an altar before a row of evergreens lit by a lone star, Father Tom Gills said his last Mass before leaving for active military duty. Until then, the pastor of the Roman Catholic St. Charles Borromeo Church in Pikesville hadn't allowed himself to think about leaving his flock. If he thought too much about leaving on the eve of this holy season, he feared it would hamper his resolve to accomplish his other mission: serving in Operation Noble Eagle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
RIGHT PLACE, wrong meal. That was our take on 49 West, a coffeehouse/wine bar/gallery on West Street in Annapolis that does well in each of those roles, but exceeds its grasp at dinner. On previous, unofficial lunchtime visits to this cozy, 19th-century storefront, we've had nothing but good food served in two rooms filled with paintings and books. But on the visit for this review, we ordered from the side of the menu available only after 6 p.m. and were disappointed to find that the quality was not the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 6, 2000
The next time you insist that the TV networks always play it safe, just remember these two words: "Twin Peaks." No one was quite sure what to make of Mark Frost and David Lynch's audaciously surreal take on love, murder and the supernatural in a small logging town, but they couldn't stop watching. "Twin Peaks" at its best is as good as director Lynch has ever been -- and that's saying something for the man who filmed "Eraserhead," "Blue Velvet" and "Wild at Heart." Curiously, part of that quality is because of the limitations TV censors put on Lynch, forcing him to be suggestive and understated where his movies went straight over the top (witness the disappointing big-screen prequel, "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me")
FEATURES
By MARY COREY Uniform options and MARY COREY Uniform options,Sun Fashion Editor | September 6, 1998
Ants in her pantsThe way Rachel Herbst sees it, the ants made all the difference.Before them, her entry in Seventeen magazine's underwear design contest was simply clever: picnic cloth briefs festooned with drawings of food. But the ants - plastic, glued on and marching toward the cherry pie - made her a winner.Now the 16-year-old from Olney is preparing to see her work, aptly titled "Ants in Your Pants," in stores including Bloomingdale's, Nordstrom and Frederick's of Hollywood next month.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
The Greatest Show on Earth made a quiet and little-watched exit across a chilly Lombard Street last night -- a well-rehearsed mass exodus that filled 32 rail coaches, 16 flatcars plus a quartet of animal stock cars.The departure of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is a spring ritual that traditionally happens somewhere in the damp hours of the night and early morning. The circus plays Baltimore and then heads to Washington for Easter.The orderly progression of exiting -- the "load-out," in circus speak -- began last evening before the final act, unnoticed by the arena's 9,000 closing-night customers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
Their hair was big, their music was loud and their lyrics were oozing with double-entendres. They've come to be known as "hair bands," and in the late '80s and early '90s, their pop-metal sound, consisting mainly of infectious party anthems and melodic "power ballads," flooded the airwaves of radio and MTV and sold millions of albums. Hair bands, so dubbed because of their ridiculously puffy, hair sprayed coiffures, celebrated the excesses of rock stardom. Their outlandish personas were defined by a life of fame, money, groupies and hangovers.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | June 17, 1997
OVER 200 YEARS Baltimore has seen a lot of changes, and in your own time you have seen some of them. Social scientists talk about demographics and the industrial base and blah, blah, blah. But if you want to measure change in Baltimore, think about what used to be delivered to your door. That is change you can connect to.For more than 100 years and until the mid-1970s, the Rice's bakery truck came to your door. This uniformed, one-man catering service brought a tray full of still-warm baked goods: Vienna bread, Parker House rolls, cherry pie -- and the big favorite year after year, according to Emory Rice Jr., Louisiana Ring cake.
NEWS
By STEPHEN SAGNER | September 28, 1994
The story is much like the one Barry Levinson tells in the movie ''Avalon.'' Both sides of my family arrived in Baltimore around 1900, during the great Jewish migration from eastern Europe. They lived for awhile in the tenements of east Baltimore where they began to build businesses, synagogues and social clubs.During the 1920s, they moved northwest, to the neat row houses of Eutaw Place. In the 1940s, they went northwest again, to the single-family houses of Forest Park (in ''Avalon,'' the move to ''the suburbs;'' Levinson and my mother both went to Forest Park High School)
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