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NEWS
July 3, 1995
The movement of Russia into the community of nations, nudged by the United States, proceeds apace with little notice. While the Yeltsin government was convulsed with parliamentary rebuke and resignations from the war in Chechnya -- and while the U.S. shuttle Atlantis was docking at the Russian space station Mir -- Vice President Al Gore and Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin were leading platoons of bureaucrats signing papers in Moscow.In the long run, those pieces of paper will be remembered from the events of the week, if only as part of a larger flow.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 1999
MOSCOW -- If ever there was an example of how hard it is for Russia's liberal politicians to work together, it was the collapse yesterday of Sergei V. Stepashin's new centrist electoral bloc.Stepashin, who was ousted from his prime minister's post by President Boris N. Yeltsin this month, had been expected to announce yesterday that he would be leading the new alliance.Instead, he surprised much of the country by declaring somewhat bitterly that he had failed to pull together the disparate group of democrats and power brokers and would be going it alone.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 29, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia's recently dismissed prime minister announced yesterday that he would run for president in 2000, adding a new twist to a week of political back-stabbing and back-room maneuvering.Former Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin was ousted Monday when President Boris N. Yeltsin dismissed his Cabinet. But Chernomyrdin fought back yesterday, portraying himself as a presidential candidate."I have decided to put forward my candidacy for the post of president," he said in an interview on the state-run ORT television.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 3, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Balkan peace envoys presented Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic yesterday with a comprehensive plan to end NATO's war and bring international troops to Kosovo.Talks were scheduled to continue today, while the Serbian parliament, normally a rubber stamp for Milosevic, was to be convened to discuss the measures. That body rejected NATO's last offer to end the Kosovo crisis on March 23, the day before the allies began their intensive bombing campaign.The plan's key features include deployment of NATO and Russian forces in Kosovo, and an end to allied airstrikes after the West verifies that Serbian security forces have started their withdrawal from the province.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- One furious Duma leader after another stood up yesterday, angrily blamed Viktor S. Chernomyrdin for the corruption and economic negligence of the past six years, then led the rank and file in an overwhelming vote against his nomination as prime minister.Every Communist voted against him. So did every member of the liberal Yabloko faction. Even one member of Chernomyrdin's party opposed him. And after it was over, President Boris N. Yeltsin said he would nominate Chernomyrdin again.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- Giving in to a hostile Congress, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin dropped his support of acting Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar yesterday and nominated in his stead a man whose roots are in the old Soviet hierarchy.The visibly unhappy president gave the job of prime minister to Viktor Chernomyrdin after deciding that the political costs were too high to keep Mr. Gaidar, the theoretical economist who launched Russia's radical, market-oriented reforms 11 months ago and who has become the focus of conservative fury over the country's economic state.
NEWS
March 24, 1998
DURING his long career, first as a red satrap and then as post-communist Russia's first president, Boris N. Yeltsin has been full of surprises. Nevertheless, his stunning decision to unceremoniously fire Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and his Cabinet raises serious questions about the 67-year-old Kremlin leader's soundness.Except for the first year of erratic reforms, Mr. Chernomyrdin, who became prime minister in December 1992, has been at the helm of government during Russia's free-market experiment.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 1998
MOSCOW -- Criticized for standing pat as Russia embarked on its economic decline, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin tried to turn tough yesterday, vowing to impose an "economic dictatorship" if confirmed as prime minister.Those are the kinds of words that might warm the hearts of the Communists whose votes he desperately needs -- but what he really had in mind for the tumbling Russian economy was a rescue built upon the U.S. dollar.A week ago Chernomyrdin's allies were talking about the need to crank up the printing presses, freeze prices and halt the convertibility of the ruble, a Soviet-style version of economic dictatorship.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 26, 1998
MOSCOW -- After two days of shock, dismal reality began settling in here yesterday. The ruble fell 10 percent, three large banks merged to avoid failure, sociologists raised the prospects of huge public protests and foreign investors were told they should expect enormous losses.The new prime minister, sounding as if he hadn't been listening to the news, said he would try to avoid tough economic measures."It's incredible watching it fall apart so quickly," said Al Breach, an economist working with the Russian government.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 31, 1998
MOSCOW -- Trying to put aside their mutual loathing, negotiators from parliamentary factions and the executive branch thought late yesterday that they had reached a new power-sharing pact that would allow Russia at last to address its financial crisis. But as soon as their negotiations concluded, the agreement began to unravel.Communist leader Gennady Zyuganov conferred with his faction's ruling council, then announced that his party could not support the deal and would not back the nomination of Viktor S. Chernomyrdin as prime minister.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Envoys from the European Union and Russia will travel to Belgrade today with a detailed NATO proposal to halt its bombing in exchange for a pullout of Yugoslav troops from Kosovo and acceptance of the alliance's conditions for ending the war.The visit, by President Martti Ahtisaari of Finland and Viktor S. Chernomyrdin of Russia, marks the most serious step toward a diplomatic solution to the conflict since NATO began bombing Yugoslavia on...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- A day after President Slobodan Milosevic of Yugoslavia was indicted on war crimes charges, a search for a negotiated solution to the conflict in Kosovo proceeded yesterday, clouded by uncertainty and recriminations but with the Russian envoy voicing modest expressions of hope.After nine hours of talks with Milosevic about a Kosovo settlement, the Russian special envoy, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, pronounced himself "very pleased," but added, "We face the most difficult negotiations in the next few days."
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | May 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- From a distance, diplomacy to end the Kosovo crisis is beginning to look like a jumble of diplomats -- with three missions under way and no sign that any can narrow the gap with Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic.First on stage was Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the former Russian prime minister, appointed by President Boris N. Yeltsin as special envoy.Then U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan appointed Karl Bildt, the former Swedish prime minister, and Eduard Kukan, a former Slovak foreign minister.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When Vice President Al Gore launched a special partnership with Russia's prime minister in 1993, the effort seemed full of promise and a perfect showcase for Gore's high-technology, futuristic vision.Tapping the talents of agency bosses and scientists, the two countries would cooperate on space, energy exploration, even public health -- projects seen as building blocks in a grand strategy of helping Russia discard its Communist past and grow into a free-market democracy.But as Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov arrives this week for the 11th meeting of their joint commission, the original promise has been all but overwhelmed by the problems facing Russia and strains in the relationship.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 11, 1998
MOSCOW -- With one short, stilted message yesterday, President Boris N. Yeltsin nominated Yevgeny M. Primakov as prime minister and instantly changed all the political rules here.Unlikely partnerships began to form at the news that Yeltsin had abandoned his first choice, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin.The fiercest of political enemies stopped quarreling. Communists and liberal democrats competed to praise Primakov. Warnings of fascism and blood in the streets abruptly stopped, and talk turned to reconciliation and compromise.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 9, 1998
MOSCOW -- Right there on the platform at the Kievsky Station, amid the familiar crowds and sights and smells, Galina and Sergei Gorvat couldn't fathom what was happening to them.This looked like the Russia they had left behind last June. That was a train they had just gotten off, and those were the same Russian kiosks in front of them, and these were the same Russian people elbowing past them."We were out of cigarettes and I went to buy some, and when I saw the price -- 18 rubles! -- I couldn't believe my eyes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- A day after President Slobodan Milosevic of Yugoslavia was indicted on war crimes charges, a search for a negotiated solution to the conflict in Kosovo proceeded yesterday, clouded by uncertainty and recriminations but with the Russian envoy voicing modest expressions of hope.After nine hours of talks with Milosevic about a Kosovo settlement, the Russian special envoy, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, pronounced himself "very pleased," but added, "We face the most difficult negotiations in the next few days."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 8, 1998
MOSCOW -- With more obstinacy than passion, Russia's lower house of parliament again rejected Boris N. Yeltsin's choice of a prime minister yesterday, daring the president to move the confrontation ahead another, more dangerous step."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 8, 1998
MOSCOW -- With more obstinacy than passion, Russia's lower house of parliament again rejected Boris N. Yeltsin's choice of a prime minister yesterday, daring the president to move the confrontation ahead another, more dangerous step."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 1998
MOSCOW -- Criticized for standing pat as Russia embarked on its economic decline, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin tried to turn tough yesterday, vowing to impose an "economic dictatorship" if confirmed as prime minister.Those are the kinds of words that might warm the hearts of the Communists whose votes he desperately needs -- but what he really had in mind for the tumbling Russian economy was a rescue built upon the U.S. dollar.A week ago Chernomyrdin's allies were talking about the need to crank up the printing presses, freeze prices and halt the convertibility of the ruble, a Soviet-style version of economic dictatorship.
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