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By Ludmilla Thorne | May 4, 1994
LAST WEEK marked the eighth anniversary of Chernobyl, the nuclear disaster that spewed 50 tons of radioactive particles (10 times the fallout of Hiroshima). The world's memory of Chernobyl has dimmed, its focus moved to other places in harm's way, like Rwanda and Bosnia. But for people living in the contaminated areas of Ukraine, Belarus and western Russia, the accident continues to wreak consequences whose danger and immensity could not have been imagined before the explosion.The small republic of Belarus was hardest hit by the catastrophe.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
Vadym Buyalsky was a lead scientist at the Ukrainian Research and Development Institute of Fire Protection & Defense when an explosion destroyed a nuclear reactor at Chernobyl in 1986 and released massive amounts of radioactive material. In the aftermath of the nuclear disaster, Buyalsky took part in the difficult cleanup, washing off the radioactive particles from nearby units and the surrounding environment. He also helped assess long-term safety issues, including preparing fire protection and suppression systems for the shelter built over the destroyed reactor to contain the radiation.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 22, 1991
"Chernobyl: The Final Warning," at 8 tonight on cable channel TNT, is a case of a good idea gone bad -- real bad.The idea behind the film, which stars Jon Voight and Jason Robards, is to use television as a kind of commemorative calendar, reminding us of important historical events -- the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., for example -- to help us understand and reconcile with them.The event tonight's film wants us to remember is the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Soviet Ukraine on April 26, 1986.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
CHECHERSK, Belarus -- The aims are decidedly modest: to mow overgrown grass in front of weathered, long-abandoned houses; open a bakery to provide fresh bread to children at village schools; plant small gardens to yield fruit and vegetables free of radiation. Those small steps are part of the latest chapter of the long recovery effort in this part of the former Soviet Union 20 years after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, the deadliest accident in the history of nuclear power.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ukraine's government has agreed to shut down the remaining nuclear reactors at its power plant in Chernobyl, which was heavily damaged in a catastrophic accident in 1986, the Clinton administration said yesterday.After three days of meetings with a U.S. delegation, Ukraine abandoned its insistence that nuclear production must continue at the plant, agreeing instead to a joint effort with the United States to find options such as energy conservation and nonnuclear power generation to replace electricity from the plant, which generates about 1,700 megawatts of power.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 22, 1991
The most striking thing about "Chernobyl: The Final Warning," a world-premiere movie on cable tonight, is that it's your basic, familiar American docudrama -- except it was made largely in the U.S.S.R., with a mixed cast of Soviet extras, English mid-level players and a couple big American movie stars.Further, it is a remarkably critical replay of the April 26, 1986, reactor explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, whose ultimate toll in death and injury is still being argued. The movie premieres at 8 p.m. on the TNT basic service, with three immediate repeats at 10 p.m., midnight and 2 a.m. (Additional plays are scheduled April 23, 24, 27 and 28.)
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 24, 1994
CHERNOBYL, Ukraine -- Nearly eight years after the Chernobyl meltdown, Ukrainian scientists have found that strontium-90 is leaching into the ground water and may reach Ukraine's most important water reservoir within a few years.The radioactive strontium is carried into the earth by rain and snow that penetrates the concrete-and-steel sarcophagus built in late 1986 to entomb the exploded Chernobyl Unit 4 nuclear reactor.Because of gaping cracks in the sarcophagus roof, about 820,000 gallons of precipitation have infiltrated the reactor building, according to new estimates by the Ukrainian state committee for nuclear and radiation safety.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | August 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A stiff southwest wind blowing across the Dakota prairie nearly 11 years ago apparently saved the United States from a nuclear disaster that could have been "worse than Chernobyl."Had the wind shifted, a fire that raged for three hours on a B-52 bomber at the Air Force base near Grand Forks, N.D., would have reached the plane's thermonuclear weapons and touched off the conventional explosives inside them.The resulting blast would have blown particles of radioactive plutonium over a 60-square-mile area of North Dakota and Minnesota, said Dr. Roger Batzel, who was head of a weapons lab when he testified before a closed Senate hearing in 1988.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | July 31, 1992
Washington. -- Bob Graham and Joe Lieberman were on one side of a long table. The expert witnesses were on the other side. Between them lay an ominous question: Is the former Soviet Union likely to experience another Chernobyl disaster?The witnesses were of one mind. The answer is yes. It could happen at any time.The two senators, Graham of Florida and Lieberman of Connecticut, served as a subcommittee on July 22. For nearly three hours they heard some grimly sobering commentary from experts on nuclear power.
NEWS
By Newsday The New York Times also contributed to this story | September 3, 1992
A large and startling increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer, perhaps a legacy of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, has been observed in Belarus children, according to scientists."
NEWS
By Charles Piller and Alissa J. Rubin and Charles Piller and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
VIENNA, Austria - Nearly two decades after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster spread radioactive fallout across much of Europe, a United Nations study has concluded that the health effects have been far less extensive than feared. The researchers confirmed 56 deaths, nine children who died of thyroid cancer and 47 emergency workers who died of acute radiation poisoning or radiation-induced cancer. They projected that 3,940 more people will die of cancer, according to the report released yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
Wolves Eat Dogs By Martin Cruz Smith. Simon & Schuster. 337 pages. $25.95. In mystery and suspense fiction, the star of a successful series generally comes equipped with an aura of invulnerability. If a hero is shot, stabbed, drugged or shoved off a waterfall, you can be virtually certain he or she will end up in a hospital, not a morgue. While reassuring to readers eager for further installments, there is an inevitable loss of suspense and plausibility. Somehow, this has never been a problem for Martin Cruz Smith, who created Russian detective Arkady Renko in the groundbreaking Gorky Park.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Anne Arundel County school officials got the system's central computers back up and running yesterday, after thwarting a computer virus that had threatened to destroy dozens of school computers across the county.Many schools' computers are still down, especially those at smaller schools, though officials hope they will be checked out and "cleaned" by the end of the week.Eight computers hit by the Chernobyl virus initially, however, might be gone for good. Technicians were able to save much of the information stored on the hard drives, but the computers are, in effect, telling themselves not to restart, said Robert C. Leib, director of business services for the schools.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Anne Arundel County school officials got the system's central computers back up and running yesterday, after thwarting a computer virus that had threatened to destroy dozens of school computers across the county.Many schools' computers are still down, especially those at smaller schools, though officials hope they will be checked out and "cleaned" by the end of the week.Eight computers hit by the Chernobyl virus initially, however, might be gone for good. Technicians were able to save much of the information stored on the hard drives, but the computers are, in effect, telling themselves not to restart, said Robert C. Leib, director of business services for the schools.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Anne Arundel County school officials shut down the district's 7,000 personal computers yesterday after eight terminals showed symptoms of a menacing computer virus named for the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.The Chernobyl virus erases a computer's hard drive and replaces its vital system settings with gibberish. Believed to have originated in Taiwan, it was timed to strike yesterday, on the Russian nuclear accident's 13th anniversary.When school officials arrived at the district's central office in Annapolis at 8: 30 a.m., they found eight of their computers malfunctioning, and immediately suspected the worst.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 6, 1996
In "The Prozac in Pandora's Box," the box contains more of a smorgasbord than merely pharmaceuticals. This cleverly titled and stylishly designed production at the Theatre Project is basically a variety show consisting of a half dozen skits on subjects ranging from Chernobyl to mythology.Written by Laura Amlie, a student in Towson State University's graduate theater program, the show began as that program's first student production. And, parts of it have the earmarks of a collegiate effort, kind of like a graduate school version of "Saturday Night Live."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- Many more people were bombarded by high doses of radiation from the Chernobyl accident than officially reported, and even those who received small doses are in jeopardy, a pioneering Russian-American study has found."
NEWS
By ASSOCATED PRESS | October 13, 1991
MOSCOW (AP) -- The fire that destroyed part of the roof of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant did not cause injuries or a radiation leak, the government said yesterday, but it was certain to intensify calls to shut down the plant.The blaze Friday night, which also forced the shutdown of a nuclear reactor, was the worst accident at the Ukrainian plant since the 1986 disaster that spewed radiation throughout Europe."We cannot sit on this powder keg any longer," Vladimir Yavorivsky, head of a Ukrainian parliamentary commission on Chernobyl, told reporters in Kiev, 80 miles south of Chernobyl.
NEWS
By Gwynne Dyer | April 26, 1996
IN AUGUST 1995, James Lovelock, probably the most important scientist of his generation, said, "The danger is that what we are doing, especially if the Chinese burn all of their coal, is to put so much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as to raise the possibility of a runaway warm-up to a new stable state. I don't mean kill everything off, but it will be a new stable state where global temperatures are more like an average of 25 degrees Celsius, which would make an awful lot of it desperately uncomfortable.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
Andrei Nikoliovitch Slesarev, 9, has spent all his growing years in the shadow of Chernobyl, the world's worst nuclear accident. The resulting pollution has taken its toll, leaving him underweight, with poor teeth and eyesight.Andrei has gained 10 pounds since he arrived in Annandale, Va., on June 17 for a six-week visit with Ann L. Gates and her family, but he still has room to grow before a child's size 7 clothing will be a good fit.During his stay in Annandale, the boy and his host family studied music and peace lessons at Common Ground, a 10-day multicultural arts program at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
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