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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | May 6, 2008
BEIJING -- Residents took to the streets of a provincial capital over the weekend to protest a multibillion-dollar petrochemical plant backed by China's leading state-run oil company. It was the latest instance of popular discontent over an environmental threat in a major city. The protest against a $5.5 billion ethylene plant under construction by PetroChina in Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province, reflected a surge in environmental awareness by urban, middle-class Chinese determined to protect their health and the value of their property.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2008
DEYANG, China -- A strong aftershock hit China's battered Sichuan region yesterday, causing landslides, knocking out telephone lines and burying vehicles, according to state news media. There were no immediate reports of deaths. The magnitude 5.5 tremor struck at 1:25 p.m. in Lixian, further complicating the job of getting aid into nearby Wenchuan, the epicenter of Monday's intense quake. The aftershock, the latest in a series this week, could be felt in Chengdu, a major city 75 miles to the southeast.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2008
DEYANG, China -- A strong aftershock hit China's battered Sichuan region yesterday, causing landslides, knocking out telephone lines and burying vehicles, according to state news media. There were no immediate reports of deaths. The magnitude 5.5 tremor struck at 1:25 p.m. in Lixian, further complicating the job of getting aid into nearby Wenchuan, the epicenter of Monday's intense quake. The aftershock, the latest in a series this week, could be felt in Chengdu, a major city 75 miles to the southeast.
NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN and ROBERT BENJAMIN,Robert Benjamin is The Sun's Beijing correspondent | May 31, 1992
Chengdu, China. -- Three years ago this week, the capital of China's most populous province seethed with anger.Chengdu's hospitals were packed with injured pro-democracy protesters, perhaps dozens of whom later died.Mangled skeletons of burned vehicles lay in a heap in the center of town, behind China's largest statue of Mao Tse-tung.Nearby, hundreds of heavily-armed police officers ringed a large block of stores completely leveled by fire.All this resulted from almost two days of hand-to-hand combat between military police and tens of thousands of demonstrators, who had come from all over Sichuan province and who were joined by a mob of hoodlums.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 7, 1993
LHASA, China -- "Take it easy" isn't just an idle salutation here. It's a survival recommendation.The first day here government hosts are adamant -- no work, no walking, not even a lot of talking. The hotel room has a bottle of oxygen, drawn upon from a plastic tube through one's nostril.At night, a doctor comes by to take your blood pressure and offer some special Chinese herbs.The source of all the fuss is a much dreaded and somewhat common illness among visitors to Tibet, high altitude sickness.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Don Lee,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2008
MIANYANG, China - The Chinese government warned yesterday that as many as 1.2 million residents might be evacuated because they could be inundated by a swelling "barrier lake" formed by the May 12 earthquake. The warning was issued hours after a Russian helicopter transported heavy machines over mountains in the northern part of Sichuan province and hundreds of Chinese soldiers carried in 10 tons of dynamite to contend with the barrier lake at Tangjiashan, about two miles upstream from the town of Beichuan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2002
BEIJING - Two leaders of the outlawed China Democracy Party were given long prison sentences this week on subversion charges, a human rights monitor reported yesterday. Hu Mingjun and Wang Sen, both from Chengdu in Sichuan province, were sentenced Thursday to 11 years and 10 years, respectively, by a court in Sichuan, according to the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy. Hu is 30 years old, said the center. It did not give Wang's age. The men were arrested in spring 2001, months after they had contacted protesting workers at a state-owned steel mill at Dazhou, in Sichuan, and issued a statement of support for them in the name of the democracy party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 9, 1998
BEIJING -- A high-profile delegation of U.S. religious leaders began arriving in Beijing yesterday for a three-week tour of China to examine the state of religious freedom here, one of the most volatile human rights issues in American diplomacy.While it is being described as private, President Clinton and President Jiang Zemin of China agreed to the mission during their summit meeting in October, and the White House picked the three-man delegation: a Jewish leader, an evangelical Protestant leader and a Roman Catholic archbishop.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | May 6, 2008
BEIJING -- Residents took to the streets of a provincial capital over the weekend to protest a multibillion-dollar petrochemical plant backed by China's leading state-run oil company. It was the latest instance of popular discontent over an environmental threat in a major city. The protest against a $5.5 billion ethylene plant under construction by PetroChina in Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province, reflected a surge in environmental awareness by urban, middle-class Chinese determined to protect their health and the value of their property.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 7, 1993
LHASA, China -- "Take it easy" isn't just an idle salutation here. It's a survival recommendation.The first day here government hosts are adamant -- no work, no walking, not even a lot of talking. The hotel room has a bottle of oxygen, drawn upon from a plastic tube through one's nostril.At night, a doctor comes by to take your blood pressure and offer some special Chinese herbs.The source of all the fuss is a much dreaded and somewhat common illness among visitors to Tibet, high altitude sickness.
NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN and ROBERT BENJAMIN,Robert Benjamin is The Sun's Beijing correspondent | May 31, 1992
Chengdu, China. -- Three years ago this week, the capital of China's most populous province seethed with anger.Chengdu's hospitals were packed with injured pro-democracy protesters, perhaps dozens of whom later died.Mangled skeletons of burned vehicles lay in a heap in the center of town, behind China's largest statue of Mao Tse-tung.Nearby, hundreds of heavily-armed police officers ringed a large block of stores completely leveled by fire.All this resulted from almost two days of hand-to-hand combat between military police and tens of thousands of demonstrators, who had come from all over Sichuan province and who were joined by a mob of hoodlums.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 1996
CHONGQING, China -- Worried about fallout from its gargantuan project to dam the mighty Yangtze River, China is creating a new province centered on this smoggy river city deep in China's interior.Awaiting only formal approval in March from China's rubber-stamp Parliament, Chongqing and three neighboring districts are breaking away from Sichuan province to form a province of their own with a population of 30 million in an area three times the size of Maryland.Like China's three other mega-cities -- Beijing, Tianjin and Shanghai -- Chongqing is to become a provincial-level city, or "zhixiashi" in official parlance.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2008
CHENGDU, China - The death toll in China's devastating earthquake topped 40,000 yesterday as the country entered a second day of national mourning and struggled to shelter more than 5 million people left homeless. As the search-and-rescue effort across the mountainous quake zone reached the ninth day, hope of finding more survivors grew increasingly dim. But small miracles abounded. State news media reported that a 31-year-old worker had been rescued at a damaged hydroelectric power plant.
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