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Sports Digest | December 11, 2013
Colleges Brenda Frese's son Tyler celebrates end of chemotherapy Tyler Thomas , a 5-year-old son of Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese , celebrated the end of three years of chemotherapy treatments for pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a party at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg Children's Center on Tuesday. "It is with great happiness that we can celebrate the end of Tyler's treatments," Frese said. "Last week, he received what will hopefully be his last dose of chemo medicine in his battle against leukemia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Last year, after Sharon Jones' third round of chemotherapy to treat stage-two pancreatic cancer, the 58-year-old soul singer cried as she decided to cut off her remaining hair, which was “hanging onto strings in little braids.” Moments later, the frontwoman of the Brooklyn, N.Y.-based group Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings found humor and strength in her new hairstyle. She even seemed to like it. “When I looked in that mirror, I was like, 'Oh! My head is pretty round. I got a nice pretty round head.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Ron Smith went on WBAL radio Thursday, just as he has for the past 27 years. But the conservative talk-show host, who was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, opened his show telling listeners — with characteristic bluntness — that he was abandoning his chemotherapy treatments. Instead, Smith will remain on the air while undergoing palliative care designed to make what time he has left as comfortable as possible. And then he simply went on with the show. "That's the way I've conducted my career," Smith, 69, said Thursday from his home in southern York County, Pa., where he's been doing most of his broadcasting work since announcing his inoperable Stage 4 cancer diagnosis on Oct. 17. "I have never been one to hide anything.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Trueheart4me was 5-foot-9, spiritual but not religious, and a social drinker, her Match.com profile read. She loved the water, traveling and a good belly laugh. There was one more thing she labeled "full disclosure. " She had cancer. "I was very lucky in that it was caught early and underwent surgery in early November that was a complete success," the profile read. "The cancer is now gone, however, I'll be in treatment for the next several months. … I expect to be finished up in early May, at which time I am also hoping my hair grows back!"
NEWS
By Newsday | May 5, 1994
NEW YORK -- Breast cancer patients who are given the highest accepted levels of chemotherapy survive longer despite the toxic side effects, according to an article to be published in today's New England Journal of Medicine.Researchers at 26 centers nationwide studied 1,529 women whose breast cancer had spread to their lymph nodes. They concluded after nearly 3 1/2 years of follow-up that the risk of relapse was cut in half by higher-dose treatments. Overall survival also was improved."Lower-dose chemotherapy is analogous to taking a baby aspirin for a headache -- there's not enough there to be adequate," said Dr. Daniel Budman, associate director of clinical oncology at North Shore University Hospital on Long Island and co-author of the article.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
Diane Cox was gravely ill with terminal cancer when she filed a $5 million lawsuit against a Columbia health care company, accusing it of giving her an overdose of chemotherapy drugs that would shorten her life. Cox, of McLean, Va., alleged that in February last year, when she was suffering from pancreatic cancer, Severn Healthcare Inc. - a provider of home-infusion services for intravenous drugs that has since merged with a Baltimore company - gave her a week's dose of chemotherapy medication over a six-hour period.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | December 5, 1990
Pasadena resident Judy Marsh, the cancer victim receiving treatment in North Carolina although her insurance company refuses to pay for it, completed her final day of intense chemotherapy treatment yesterday.Marsh's husband, Roland, said his 49-year-old wife is "having a rough time of it" but is hanging in."She's doing pretty good," he said. "She is going to make it. It's every bit as rough as they make it out to be."Marsh received five months of chemotherapy in just three days as part of an autologous bone marrow transplant, in which some of her bone marrow is removed, frozen and returned after the chemotherapy is given.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 15, 2003
Arthritis remedy Celebrex can boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy for lung cancer, shrinking tumors and cutting off their blood supply, Manhattan scientists will report in a study published today. The small research project, which involved 29 patients with the most common form of the cancer, marks the first time the widely used arthritis medication has proved effective against active tumors. Previous studies suggested it can inhibit cancer development before it starts. In 1999, the Food and Drug Administration licensed Celebrex as a preventive for patients with a rare genetic condition in which pre-cancerous polyps develop into colorectal cancer.
NEWS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
Orioles outfielder Eric Davis will begin 22 weeks of chemotherapy Wednesday as part of his aftercare for colon cancer but still plans to return to the club, possibly as soon as mid-August, team officials said yesterday.Davis, 35, who underwent surgery on June 13 at Johns Hopkins Hospital to remove a cancerous mass and one-third of his colon, will begin treatment at the UCLA School of Medicine near his home in Woodland Hills, Calif., but eventually intends to transfer his treatment to Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
SAN ANTONIO -- In the battle against breast cancer, doctors over the years have focused on one particular substance within the tumor cell carrying the descriptive, if not grimly ironic, name of HER2.Interest in HER2 -- its complete name is HER2neu -- has risen and waned over time as researchers first speculated that excess amounts in tumor cells could predict how aggressively a tumor ** would behave but then mostly discounted that notion.Now researchers are taking a second look at HER2 after recent studies suggesting that, rather than predicting aggressiveness, it may play a role in determining whether the tumor is resistant to chemotherapy.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 11, 2013
Colleges Brenda Frese's son Tyler celebrates end of chemotherapy Tyler Thomas , a 5-year-old son of Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese , celebrated the end of three years of chemotherapy treatments for pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a party at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg Children's Center on Tuesday. "It is with great happiness that we can celebrate the end of Tyler's treatments," Frese said. "Last week, he received what will hopefully be his last dose of chemo medicine in his battle against leukemia.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Fred Dickson is a cancer survivor, a father of three, an aspiring author, a master plumber and an inspirational speaker The 53-year-old also happens to be a semiprofessional football player. The 6-foot-5 defensive end with the white mustache and shaved head is the oldest player on the Arbutus Big Red, a team that's made up largely of teenagers. Dickson believes he is the oldest semipro football player to start a game. A Woodlawn alumnus and a former college player at Salisbury, Dickson was inspired to return to the field by an apparent recovery that was not supposed to happen.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Ron A. Szymanski, who was chief software architect at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died July 26 of stomach cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 34. Born and raised in Middlesex, N.J., Mr. Szymanski was a 1996 graduate of Middlesex High School. In 2000, he earned a bachelor's degree in math education from The College of New Jersey in Ewing. In 2004, he earned a master's degree in computer science from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, N.J. "Ron always had a gift for computers, so that led him to accept an opportunity at Fort Monmouth rather than going into teaching," said his wife of nine years, the former Amy Erica Speiser.
BUSINESS
By Steve Earley, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
When Alissa Harrington was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 38, she did what she's accustomed to doing when she needs answers. She reached for her smartphone. The Stevenson University technology professional says mobile apps helped her overcome one of the biggest burdens for anyone confronting a life-threatening illness: Managing the deluge of medical records and appointments and communicating what comes out of those to friends and family. "Mobile apps have really eliminated that," said Harrington, who as an instructional designer builds online courses and trains faculty how to apply technology to learning.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | January 6, 2013
Like all parents, John and Tammy Carver face daily challenges in trying to raise a large brood. But for the Manchester couple, who have adopted six youngsters from orphanages in Russia and Belarus between 1997 and 2004, those challenges also include helping their youngest child fight cancer. Juliana Carver, 11, is now in the middle of 36 weeks of chemotherapy, most of which is performed on an in-patient basis at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital. "I'm a little bit tired," said Juliana, who is being treated by a team of three oncologists.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
It is well documented that African-American women with breast cancer are more likely to have a more aggressive type of the disease that kills them, but why remains a mystery. The answers may be found one day soon, as researchers focus more on the genetic makeup of cancer tumors and how African-American women may respond differently to treatment than women of other races. "There are two different tracks of research going on that could in the future help better treat African-American women with breast cancer ," said Rebecca McCoy, community health director of the advocacy group Komen Maryland.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | October 14, 1990
Eva Simmons went to court Friday with her life on the line. If she lost her case, she would almost surely die of breast cancer.But she prevailed in the emergency court hearing, and walked out with a judge's order requiring an insurance company to pay for controversial treatment that may be her only chance of beating her advanced case of the disease. With that ruling, the 45-year-old Arnold woman is scheduled to check into the Johns Hopkins Hospital Oncology Center today to begin treatment.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
Since he joined the Baltimore County Fire Department in 1989, Barney has searched out more than 40 people, living and dead, in seven states. Now the 6-year-old golden retriever is in trouble his life threatened by cancer and human comrades are seeking help for him.They need $2,000 to pay for chemotherapy.About two weeks ago, Lt. Dan Kluge, Barney's handler, said he found a lump on the left side of the dog's neck and took him to the Falls Road Animal Hospital, whose veterinarians have treated the department's two search dogs for years.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network applauds the work of the Maryland General Assembly in passing the Kathleen Mathias Oral Chemotherapy Act of 2012. The provisions of the bill went into effect Oct. 1, resulting in increased quality of life for many cancer patients. In addition to bringing the cost of oral chemotherapy into line with that of intravenous chemotherapy, patients who opt for oral chemotherapy will be able to save the time and travel costs associated with trips to a treatment center, which can go on for months for intravenous chemotherapy.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
A raft of new state laws take effect Monday, imposing new requirements from the car seat to the hearse. Children under 8 years old will be required to sit in a booster seat or child seat until they reach a certain height - the Maryland legislature repealed a provision that allowed heavier children to forego a special seat. And morticians will have to follow stricter rules when handling the dead, under legislation enacted by the General Assembly earlier this year. Other laws cut costs for patients undergoing oral chemotherapy, allow sports fans to win cash prizes in online fantasy football tournaments and give prisoners a reprieve from having to pay child support while behind bars.
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