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By Edward Lee | January 11, 2012
When the Ravens signed left tackle Bryant McKinnie on Aug. 24, then added center Andre Gurode on Sept. 5, the moves confirmed a sense of flux and uncertainty for the offensive line. But after a regular season in which the offensive line helped the offense finish the regular season ranked 10th in the NFL in rushing (1,996 yards), tied for 10 th in rushing touchdowns (15), and tied for 12th in sacks allowed, starting tackles McKinnie and Michael Oher, starting guards Marshal Yanda and Ben Grubbs, starting center Matt Birk and Gurode have found a comfort level with one another and within the team's zone-blocking scheme.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
With more than 20 years of experience, R&B singer Joe has had a front-row seat to watch the genre evolve.  And in 2014, the 41-year-old singer born Joseph Thomas believes R&B needs to remember romance - and being in love with more than only yourself - still matters. To him, the influence of rap's street bravado has chilled a genre that has long identified with warmth. “I just want it to be a little bit more about love and more about respect, and to talk about things that's going on right now, as opposed to bigging yourself up and making yourself look real smooth and fly,” Joe said on the phone earlier this week from New Jersey.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 23, 2011
In the eight consecutive starts that Torrey Smith has made, it's clear that his speed has helped the rookie wide receiver connect with quarterback Joe Flacco. After all, Smith ranks second to the Cincinnati Bengals' A.J. Green in receiving yards by a rookie, and Smith leads the Ravens in receiving touchdowns with five. But could Flacco's chemistry with Smith impact his relationship with Lee Evans, Smith's predecessor who returned on Sunday after a seven-game absence because of a left ankle injury?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Dr. M. Daniel Lane, a retired Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, biochemist and esteemed teacher who studied the body's chemical processes that affect hunger, died of myeloma April 10 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Washington resident was 83. Colleagues said he typically arrived at his classroom at 6 a.m. and filled numerous sliding blackboards with notes for the day's material. These became known as the "Lane Lectures. " Dr. Paul Rothman, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Dr. Lane "a premier scientist and one of our most cherished colleagues.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Nia Alleyne is a critical cog in No. 2 Aberdeen's run to the state tournament as it goes for its first state title beginning with Thursday's semifinal vs. Largo at UMBC. Averaging 12 points, seven rebounds and four steals, the 5-foot-8 junior can play any forward or guard position. Alleyne, 17, is as strong in the classroom as she is on the court. Enrolled in Aberdeen's challenging Science and Mathematics Academy, she maintains a 3.4 GPA and plans to become a pharmacist. She plays Amateur Athletic Union basketball for the Baltimore Cougars and runs cross country and track for the Eagles.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
Linda Sweeting, a Towson University chemistry professor who studied why wintergreen candies glow in the dark when chewed, died Sept. 28 of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 61. A teacher of organic chemistry for the past 33 years, she researched the phenomenon of triboluminescence, the emission of light when a crystal is crushed. She also wrote and spoke widely about professional ethics for scientists. Born in Toronto, she earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Toronto and her doctorate in organic chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 13, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- In the old days at the University of Maryland, an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory was one of the most unloved places on campus.There were foul odors, flaming Bunsen burners, fragile glassware, roaring fume hoods and unsteady bottles of noxious chemicals that could dissolve a careless student's sneakers and quickly reduce a cotton lab coat to tatters.Today? Through a quiet revolution known as "micro-scale" chemistry, students are conducting experiments with down-sized equipment and tiny samples that dramatically reduce accident risk, fumes and hazardous waste, plus the expense of buying and storing chemicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Filmmakers David Posamentier and Geoff Moore knew Annapolis was the perfect place to make their movie when someone heaved a trash can through a plate-glass window - and no one made a peep. The someone was actor Sam Rockwell, who stars in "Better Living Through Chemistry" as a nebbishy small-town pharmacist unexpectedly displaying a chemically enhanced backbone. The place was State Circle in Annapolis, just across the street from the Maryland State House. Posamentier and Moore were shooting a scene that involved Rockwell's character vandalizing his own pharmacy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 25, 2008
Dr. David Webb Herlocker, former chairman of the chemistry department at what is now McDaniel College and an avid walker, died of heart failure Friday at his Westminster home. He was 67. Dr. Herlocker was born in Chicago and raised in Peoria, Ill. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1962 from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., where he had been elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He earned a master's degree in chemistry in 1964, and his doctorate in inorganic chemistry in 1966, both from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 7, 1994
There's a reason why it appears from time to time that ESPN's Dan Patrick and Keith Olbermann are talking right past you on the 11 p.m. "SportsCenter."They are.Quite frankly, there are infrequent moments where a reference from a production meeting or a conversation will creep into Olbermann's or Patrick's copy and into your living room, and either you'll get it or you won't.Even if you don't get that joke, just wait awhile, for there'll be another one coming right around the bend shortly.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | April 4, 2014
With five weeks remaining before the NCAA men's lacrosse tournament, there is no clear-cut favorite to win the championship, but No. 1 Loyola Maryland appears to be the team to beat. The Greyhounds (9-1) have good speed and depth. They are well-coached, creative on defense and offense, and strong in the middle of the field as far as midfielders and goalie. Coach Charley Toomey won't say it, but Loyola has been the most consistent team since the season started, and that alone separates it from the rest of the field.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Dominican slugger Nelson Cruz sat at his new locker a few weeks ago and surveyed the Orioles' spring training clubhouse. In one corner, Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Yin Chen was huddled with his interpreter. On the other side of the room, South Korean star Suk-min Yoon was playing pingpong. Right beside Cruz was Cuban outfielder Henry Urrutia, soaking in the experience of a marquee Latin American player who has not forgotten what it was like to be a stranger in a strange new land.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Philip Joseph DiPaula, a retired Forest Park and Polytechnic Institute science teacher who received two Purple Hearts during World War II, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Saturday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Edmondson Heights resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on Piedmont Avenue, he was the son of Antonio DiPaula, who owned a North Avenue confectionery and fruit store, and Vincenzina Restivo DiPaula, a homemaker. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Filmmakers David Posamentier and Geoff Moore knew Annapolis was the perfect place to make their movie when someone heaved a trash can through a plate-glass window - and no one made a peep. The someone was actor Sam Rockwell, who stars in "Better Living Through Chemistry" as a nebbishy small-town pharmacist unexpectedly displaying a chemically enhanced backbone. The place was State Circle in Annapolis, just across the street from the Maryland State House. Posamentier and Moore were shooting a scene that involved Rockwell's character vandalizing his own pharmacy.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
At the Swan and Dolphin Resort during this week's winter meetings, there are a lot of baseball experts talking about talent, resorting to on-base percentage and WAR to evaluate value. But how do you measure chemistry? How does having a good clubhouse guy improve your team and your ability to win on the field? And how do you rebound when you lose one? That's one of the questions facing Orioles manager Buck Showalter right now after the club traded closer Jim Johnson to the Oakland Athletics last week and also lost outfielder Nate McLouth and right-hander Scott Feldman to free agency.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
The rebuilding project surrounding the Navy men's basketball team is in its third year under coach Ed DeChellis. And the hope this winter revolves around the return of all five starters from last season's squad. Junior forward Worth Smith (10.2 points and 5.4 rebounds per game), sophomore point guard Tilman Dunbar (9.5 points and 4.9 assists per game), junior guard Brandon Venturini (8.8 points per game) and senior guard Thurgood Wynn (3.9 points per game) are back. And sophomore center Will Kelly (2.7 points and 3.4 rebounds per game)
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | March 9, 1993
No one knows sports from the inside the way Calvin Hill does.Hill, who will be the speaker at the 30th annual Scholar-Athlete banquet at Martin's West tomorrow night, has been deeply involved in this country's three biggest sports: football, basketball and baseball.There are people who know more about football than Calvin. There are people who know more about basketball and baseball.But no one has seen all three from the inside the way Hill has.Calvin is best known as a football player. He was a star running back at Yale when the Ivy League was still drawing 60,000 to games -- and was still good enough to produce NFL players.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 21, 2006
This is weird to say, but the biggest challenge to date for the defending national champions might come tonight against a sub-.500 team. When you glance over the Maryland women's basketball schedule, Loyola might not look like much. It's one of those games in which as long as the Terps stay in their own lane, they should be able to cruise to an easy win. But tonight we'll see the start of a chemistry experiment that Terps coach Brenda Frese has been planning for the past year. She's going to introduce a couple of droplets of a brand-new substance to what was already a nearly perfect mixture and watch as the rest of the country holds its breath waiting for an explosion.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
The growing timing and chemistry between Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco and rookie wide receiver Marlon Brown was one of the lone bright spots Sunday during a disheartening loss to the Cleveland Browns. Brown caught two touchdown passes and a two-point conversion to account for 14 of the Ravens' points during a 24-18 defeat at FirstEnergy Stadium. With his 6-foot-5, 205-pound frame and athleticism, Brown is an inviting target for Flacco. "Honestly, it's nothing complicated," said Brown, who went undrafted out of Georgia after tearing his anterior cruciate ligament last November.
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