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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Shirley D. Patterson, a retired chemist who taught at what is now Community College of Baltimore County at Essex, died July 15 of heart failure at her Chattanooga, Tenn., home. She was 68. The daughter of an educator and a homemaker, Shirley Dale Patterson, who was known as Dale Patterson, was born and raised in Baltimore. After graduating from Western High School in 1961, she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1965 from Washington College in Chestertown, where she was president of the Washington College Society of Sciences and was co-winner of the Clark-Porter Medal for having most clearly improved campus life through her character and integrity.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Eleanor Louise Taylor, a retired Johns Hopkins Hospital chemist, died of coronary artery disease May 6 at the institution where she worked. The Catonsville resident was 90. Born Eleanor Louise Harnishfeger in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Louis Harnishfeger, a federal government employee, and Minerva Harnishfeger, a city Department of Public Welfare nurse. She lived on Schley Avenue and was a 1942 Eastern High School graduate. She earned a bachelor's degree from Washington College in Chestertown and studied at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 30, 2011
Dr. Albert William Tiedemann Jr., the retired chief chemist for the maker of Bromo Seltzer, who was active in the Naval Reserve, died of pneumonia April 20 at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 86 and lived in Parkville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Eutaw Place and in Hamilton, he attended Immaculate Conception School and was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. He then joined the Navy and attended programs at Mount St. Mary's University and the University of Notre Dame. He served as an ensign in the Southwest Pacific during World War II and was later a founder of the Naval Reserve Association.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Shirley D. Patterson, a retired chemist who taught at what is now Community College of Baltimore County at Essex, died July 15 of heart failure at her Chattanooga, Tenn., home. She was 68. The daughter of an educator and a homemaker, Shirley Dale Patterson, who was known as Dale Patterson, was born and raised in Baltimore. After graduating from Western High School in 1961, she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1965 from Washington College in Chestertown, where she was president of the Washington College Society of Sciences and was co-winner of the Clark-Porter Medal for having most clearly improved campus life through her character and integrity.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 14, 2011
Eugene Francis O'Conor, a retired chemist and scientist who was a member of the Maryland Squash Hall of Fame, died Monday of kidney failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 87. Mr. O'Conor was born in Baltimore and raised in Guilford and Annapolis, the son of Herbert Romulus and Eugenia Byrnes O'Conor. His father had been Maryland attorney general and governor from 1939 to 1947, when he was elected to the U.S. Senate. Senator O'Conor, later a Baltimore lawyer, died in 1960.
NEWS
February 14, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Charles J. Shoemaker, an authority on respiratory protective equipment who helped design some of the gas masks used by troops in the Persian Gulf war, will be offered at 11 a.m. today at St. John's Roman Catholic Church-Long Green in Hydes.Mr. Shoemaker, who was 64, died of cancer Tuesday at his Baldwin home.He was marketing representative for ILC Dover of Frederica, Del., which specializes in production of NASA space suits and chemical protective equipment.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Theodore John Carski, a chemist whose work contributed to the early development of single-use medical devices, died Tuesday of cerebrovascular disease at the Chestnut Green Health Center at Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. He was 99. A Baltimore native raised in Canton, Mr. Carski went straight from high school to work for a local company as a quality control chemist, then as a research chemist at Johns Hopkins Hospital -- while taking night classes at Hopkins' old McCoy evening college.
NEWS
September 23, 2006
Ellsworth G. Acker, a retired chemist, died of cancer Sept. 13 at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. The Taylorsville resident was 86. Born in Kokomo, Ind., and raised in Northeast Baltimore's Hamilton section, he was a 1938 graduate of City College. He earned a bachelor's degree in physical science at the University of Maryland. In 1943, Mr. Ellsworth joined the Navy and served as a captain aboard an amphibious craft in the Pacific. After the war, he earned a second bachelor's degree in chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University and became a chemist at W.R. Grace.
NEWS
By These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. If informationhasn't been published about someone in your family who has passed away, please call The Anne Arundel County Sun at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211; you may also fax your information to us at 332-6677 | April 17, 1992
Services for retired chemist Daniel William Fedak of Prompton, Pa., will take place at 10 a.m. tomorrow, at the Barranco and Sons SevernaPark Funeral Home.Visitation at the funeral home will be from 8:30 to 10 a.m. tomorrow.Mr. Fedak, 74, died April 15 of a heart attack at his home.Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Fedak previously lived in Baltimore and Arbutus.During World War II, he served as a captain in the U.S. Army, stationed at Edgewood Arsenal. After that, he worked asa chemist for various companies in the Baltimore area, before movingto Prompton to work for the Gentex Co. for 30 years.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 25, 1994
MOSCOW -- Only last month, Vil S. Mirzayanov was sitting in jail charged with betraying his country's secrets. Yesterday, he was invited to address parliament, where his comments drew a respectful hearing.It was a long way from the early hours of Oct. 22, 1992, when Dr. Mirzayanov was awakened by KGB agents pounding on his door and hustled off for questioning.He was accused of revealing state secrets for disclosing that Russia had continued chemical weapons research well after it told the world it had stopped.
EXPLORE
April 18, 2013
Central Library 10375 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia. 410-313-7800. •All Together Now. Saturdays, 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. All ages; 30 minutes. •English Conversation Club. Mondays, 10 a.m.; and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Practice speaking and understanding English in a group setting. Register before attending. •Noontime. Third Thursdays, noon. •Play Partners. Fridays, 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Ages up to 23 months with adult; 20-30 minutes. East ColumbiaBranch 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | December 30, 2011
  Ever wonder how all those bubbles got into the champagne? Just in time for your New Year's toasts, the American Chemical Society has created a video with an explanation. Unlike other wine, which undergoes one fermentation process, champagne undergoes two. Carbon dioxide gas is trapped during the second one and it dissolves into the wine and forms the bubbles. The bubbles ascend along the length of the bottle, dragging the molecules of the carbon dioxide and about 600 other chemicals that form the aroma and flavor of the champagne.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 30, 2011
Dr. Albert William Tiedemann Jr., the retired chief chemist for the maker of Bromo Seltzer, who was active in the Naval Reserve, died of pneumonia April 20 at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 86 and lived in Parkville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Eutaw Place and in Hamilton, he attended Immaculate Conception School and was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. He then joined the Navy and attended programs at Mount St. Mary's University and the University of Notre Dame. He served as an ensign in the Southwest Pacific during World War II and was later a founder of the Naval Reserve Association.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 14, 2011
Eugene Francis O'Conor, a retired chemist and scientist who was a member of the Maryland Squash Hall of Fame, died Monday of kidney failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 87. Mr. O'Conor was born in Baltimore and raised in Guilford and Annapolis, the son of Herbert Romulus and Eugenia Byrnes O'Conor. His father had been Maryland attorney general and governor from 1939 to 1947, when he was elected to the U.S. Senate. Senator O'Conor, later a Baltimore lawyer, died in 1960.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 5, 2011
Dr. John J. Gibbs, a retired Food and Drug Administration research chemist, died of complications of a brain disorder, frontotemporal degeneration, March 27 at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. The former Timonium resident was 73. Born in Troy, N.Y., he was the son of Donald C. Gibbs and the former Mary Loretta McBride. He lived on Mount Royal Avenue in Baltimore and earned a chemistry degree at the College of William and Mary, where he was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
NEWS
January 2, 1998
Chemist Laura L. McConnell of Crownsville, who studies how pesticides reach the Chesapeake Bay by air, was named Herbert L. Rothbart Outstanding Early Career Research Scientist 1997 by the Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville.The research service is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief scientific agency.McConnell was honored for planning and conducting the first simultaneous measurements of air and surface-water concentrations of 20 pesticides in the bay during various seasons.
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