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Chemical Weapons

NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 30, 2013
"Oh, when will they ever learn? Oh, when will they ever learn?" -- Peter, Paul and Mary By the time you read this, U.S. missiles and bombs may be falling on Syria. Why? Syria hasn't attacked us. It does not pose a security threat to the United States. These were arguments made against the Bush administration's intervention in Iraq by some who now urge us to make war on Syria. Secretary of State John Kerry, who as a senator was for the funding of U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, before he was against it, says the United States is certain that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons on his own people, thus crossing a "red line" established by President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
By Doyle McManus | August 29, 2013
President Barack Obama appears increasingly ready to launch a military strike in response to Syrian President Bashar Assad's apparent use of chemical weapons against civilians. But the goal won't be to topple the Assad government, even though President Obama has wanted that outcome for more than two years. Instead, White House officials say, the goal will be more limited: deterrence. The strikes will be aimed primarily at deterring Mr. Assad from using chemical weapons again. But there are other kinds of deterrence Mr. Obama is hoping for too. He hopes to deter other adversaries, especially Iran, from concluding that he doesn't mean it when he proclaims a "red line," as he did on chemical weapons in Syria last year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 27, 2013
President Barack Obama, in a sea of foreign policy troubles, accepted his leadership responsibilities in a CNN interview last week while lamenting the complexity of these challenges. He noted the old Harry Truman dictum that "the buck stops" in the Oval Office and asserted U.S. power and influence in the world must be "in our long-term national interests. " He mentioned both in the context of the developing civil wars in Egypt and Syria and growing calls for American intervention. The reports that chemical weapons were used by the regime in Syria against the insurgents, he said, "starts getting to some core national interests that the United States has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies [and]
NEWS
August 26, 2013
When a government viciously attacks its own citizens with weapons of mass destruction, killing or injuring hundreds of innocent men, women and children, its actions represent a violation of long-established international norms that the world cannot ignore. That is the situation now facing President Barack Obama following reports last week that chemical weapons were used against residents of a rebellious Damascus neighborhood. As Secretary of State John Kerry made clear in his televised statement this afternoon, there is now little if any doubt that the Syrian government has carried out crimes against humanity that demand a clear and forceful response from the U.S. and its allies.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
President Barack Obama's recent decision to provide weapons to the Syrian rebels is just another of the administration's huge mistakes that will have dire consequences for both the United States as well as Israel ("Backers of Syrian rebels agree to send weapons," June 23). The Obama administration's excuses to justify U.S. involvement in the Syrian civil war is that chemical weapons have been used by President Bashar Assad's regime and that a red line in the sand has been crossed.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Having determined that the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad has used chemical weapons against his opponents in the country's bloody two-year civil war, the Obama administration is now reportedly preparing to send lethal military aid to rebel forces battling the regime. Mr. Obama said earlier this year that any use of chemical weapons by the Syrian military would cross a "red line" that invited a U.S. response. Now that American intelligence has confirmed Syria has crossed that line, the U.S. response must be measured but leave no doubt that the use of such weapons will not be tolerated.
NEWS
By Joel Andreas | May 30, 2013
In his recent speech, President Barack Obama set forth what he described as narrow, reasonable guidelines for using drones to carry out targeted killings overseas. The U.S., he said, will only use drone strikes "against terrorists who pose a continuing and imminent threat to the American people. " Moreover, the U.S. will only act when other governments are unwilling or unable to stop terrorists in their territories and we do not have the ability to capture them. These guidelines still give the U.S. a self-granted license to use remote-controlled planes to kill people at its discretion around the world, and, worse, they further institutionalize this dangerous new type of warfare.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
Syrian President Bashar Assad's brutal war against his domestic opponents has taken some 70,000 lives so far and reduced much of the country to rubble, yet there's no sign either side has gained a decisive advantage in the two-year-old conflict. The European Union's decision this week to lift its ban against arming the Syrian rebels is ostensibly aimed at prodding the combatants into a negotiated settlement, but the effect could be just the opposite if it encourages both sides to dig in their heels even deeper.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 10, 2013
In Hillary Clinton's farewell remarks in February on stepping down as President Barack Obama's secretary of state, she echoed one of her predecessors, Madeleine Albright, declaring America to be "the indispensable nation. " "We are the force for progress, prosperity and peace," Mrs. Clinton elaborated. "And because we have to get it right for ourselves. " Ms. Albright had put it this way: "If we have to use force, it is because we are America. We are the indispensable nation.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Having vowed that any use of chemical weapons by Syria would cross a U.S. "red line" and provoke a strong American response "with enormous consequences," President Barack Obama now finds himself under increasing pressure to act, following reports by U.S. and foreign intelligence agencies that the regime of President Bashar Assad used deadly sarin gas against opponents last year. The problem for Mr. Obama is that the military options for enforcing his promise range from bad to very bad - while the risks of doing nothing may be even worse.
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