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Chemical Weapons

NEWS
By Rebecca A. Adelman | January 2, 2014
In three weeks, representatives from the Assad regime and the opposition are scheduled to convene in Geneva to begin the process of negotiating peace in Syria's civil war - five months after the government's chemical weapons attacks killed more than 1,400 people. The atrocities were depicted in a series of casualty photographs and videos that circulated globally on news and social media, and they provoked the threat of military action against the Assad government by the United States.
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NEWS
By Sam Wazan | November 18, 2013
Desperately yearning for the carnage of the Lebanese civil war to end, my mother once told a neighbor, "I don't know whether to prepare dinner for my children or myself for a funeral. " It was 1975, I was 10 years old, and my neighborhood in Beirut had disintegrated into a combat zone. I took shelter between the stairways and garages to avoid sniper fire, rocket shrapnel and tank artillery. Of course, had chemical weapons been fired, I would have perished no matter where I hid. But I survived and managed to immigrate to the United States in 1989.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Lenny Siegel | September 25, 2013
Globally, chemical weapons demilitarization has been difficult, slow and costly, but with technologies that have been developed over the past two decades, the safe destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is feasible. While the diplomats work out the principles for sequestering and eliminating Syrian chemical warfare materiel, our government and others should be developing a strategy for safe, secure demilitarization. That work must begin now, not only because it will take time, but also because it is likely to raise issues that the diplomats will need to resolve.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
Jonah Goldberg's muddled perspective ( "Obama's blunder has handed Assad a huge victory," Sept. 18) on the administration's action regarding the Bashar Assad regime's use of chemical weapons is more reflective of his political views than the reality of the situation. Apparently, because America has not yet taken military action Mr. Goldberg throws up his hands and declares that President Barack Obama is "blundering," has no policy toward Syria and "handed Assad a huge victory.
NEWS
By Adil Shamoo and Bonnie Bricker | September 23, 2013
It took chemical weapons to make the deaths of Syrian civilians matter to the rest of the world. Prior to the sarin gas attack near Damascus in August, more than 100,000 had died in the civil war, including many innocent civilians. After the chemical weapons attack, the deaths continued to mount - with more than 1,000 deaths during the recent week of negotiations between Russia and the U.S. to stop the use of chemical weapons on Syrians. President Barack Obama has rightly singled out the use of chemical weapons as beyond any acceptable limits because of the great suffering these weapons inflict on victims.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
On the surface it sounds like a virtuous ideal: America, which has long stood against tyranny and injustice throughout the world, coming to the aid of the Syrian people in upholding the international ban on chemical weapons ( "A shaky but promising deal on Syria," Sept. 16). However, what is often overlooked is that the U.S. did not come on board until 1975, after it had already dropped sarin gas on a village in Vietnam, presumably eradicating some of the enemy as well as many innocent civilians.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 18, 2013
Chemical weapons are evil, but you could also say they're a curse. They have a talismanic power to bend and distort U.S. foreign policy. You can ask George W. Bush or Barack Obama. In 2003, then-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz gave a lengthy interview to Vanity Fair that caused a huge uproar, largely because the magazine shamefully distorted what he was trying to say. Mr. Wolfowitz explained that within the Bush administration there were a lot of arguments for why we should invade Iraq.
NEWS
September 17, 2013
While many would argue that there are no rules in war, I feel that a terrible line was crossed with the use of poison gas munitions by the government of Syria on its own civilians. Such wide-scale barbarism demands a U.S. military response, regardless of whether it is in our national interest in its strictest definition, because only we can, and it is clearly the right thing to do. The fact that many of the rebels are anti-American religious fundamentalist is no reason to let a Hitler slaughter civilians if we can help stop him. I am not calling for an American invasion, just a strong military message that such behavior is unacceptable to us, the same way we regard the use of nuclear weapons in battle.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
United Nations inspectors aren't saying who launched the chemical weapons attack that killed 1,400 people in Syria in August, but it would be difficult for anyone - including President Bashar Assad's apologists in Moscow - to maintain the argument that it was anyone but the Assad regime. The report found that Sarin gas was used on a large scale and was delivered by surface-to-surface missiles, some of which were marked with what appear to be Cyrillic characters. That suggests a level of armament and technical ability far beyond what any rebel group in Syria is capable of. Meanwhile, another U.N. panel monitoring human rights violations in Syria said it is investigating 14 incidents of possible chemical weapons use in the country.
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