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Chemical Weapons

NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Under pressure of a late April deadline, President Clinton launched yesterday what he promises will be a furious campaign to win Senate ratification of a treaty to 'N eliminate chemical weapons worldwide.Mindful of the need for Republican votes to approve the treaty, which has languished on Capitol Hill since 1993, Clinton invited a distinguished bipartisan cast of military and civilian leaders to join him yesterday on the South Lawn of the White House.Those gathered with Clinton under a glorious blue sky included former Secretary of State James A. Baker III, a veteran of the Reagan and Bush administrations; former Republican Sen. Nancy Kassebaum Baker of Kansas; former Democratic Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma; and Colin L. Powell, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
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NEWS
September 14, 1996
SO GREAT is the Republican impulse to deny President Clinton bill-signing ceremonies before the November election that his opponent, Bob Dole, has slipped into a negative posture that strikes us as dumb politics. Acting somewhat as Senate majority leader in absentia, Citizen Dole has used his influence with some former colleagues to ditch two key pieces of legislation -- a wide-ranging reform of immigration laws and ratification of a Chemical Weapons Convention crafted during the Bush administration.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2003
ANNISTON, Ala. - With the push of a button and a spurt of steam yesterday, the Army began burning the millions of pounds of chemical weapons stored here, after years of legal wrangling and despite outcries from worried residents. The first M-55 rocket, after it was drained of the deadly nerve agent sarin, was chopped into eight pieces and roasted in a 1,100-degree furnace, turning a Cold War relic into a pile of ash. "This is absolutely a gorgeous day," said Michael B. Abrams, a spokesman for the Anniston Chemical Agent Disposal Facility.
NEWS
By Barbara Wasserman and Martin Wasserman | September 26, 2011
The monkey in the video spasms violently. He's just been injected with a massive dose of physostigmine — more than 30 times the maximum limit recommended by the Food and Drug Administration — causing vomiting, breathing difficulty, seizures and even death. The video in question was obtained from the United States Army through the Freedom of Information Act by the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. It's a military chemical casualty training video, and it depicts what will happen in an upcoming course at Aberdeen Proving Ground here in Maryland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After years of Pentagon denials, a group of veterans of the Persian Gulf war is offering the first compelling evidence that U.S. troops were exposed to Iraqi chemical weapons. The veterans say that nerve gas and other chemical agents have begun to ravage their bodies.The soldiers and former soldiers were members of the Army's 37th Engineer Battalion. Unlike thousands of other Americans who have complained that they suffer from the ailments collectively described as gulf war syndrome, the men of the 37th can pinpoint the time and place that they believe they were exposed to chemical weapons: 2: 05 p.m. March 4, 1991, when the battalion blew up 33 Iraqi bunkers in the southern Iraqi desert.
NEWS
By Tim Collie and Tim Collie,Tampa Tribune | February 22, 1991
WITH U.S. TROOPS, SAUDI ARABIA -- With a major ground war seemingly imminent, U.S. commanders say they are certain that Iraq will use chemical weapons against U.S. soldiers.That will leave the first U.S. troops entering Kuwait fighting in gas masks and bulky chemical protective suits, cutting down their effectiveness and slowing the pace of battle.In reaching their conclusion, the commanders are depending on a flurry of recent intelligence gathered from captured Iraqi troops and other sources:* Iraq distributed different types of chemical rounds to division commanders, apparently giving these leaders the authority to use them in ground combat, military intelligence sources say.* The Iraqis may be putting cyanide in rocket-propelled grenades and other types of rounds, one officer said, giving them the ability to kill a tank crew and take over the vehicle.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - As the Pentagon prepares for a possible invasion of Iraq, military planners say the most complicated problem they face is the chance that President Saddam Hussein might use chemical or biological weapons against American forces and their allies. That prospect has colored planning for almost every aspect of a possible invasion, from training and supplies to the best location and time of year for an assault, military officials said. The chance of Hussein's firing missiles tipped with chemical or biological warheads at Israel and other U.S. allies has also prompted discussion of destroying his stockpiles or limiting his ability to use them.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
South Baltimore's heavily industrial Fairfield peninsula has always seen plenty of out-of-town visitors: ship captains bringing in cars, truck drivers carrying oil, railroad engineers taking out chemicals.And now, the Central Intelligence Agency.In the past 18 months, CIA operatives - along with intelligence analysts from the Defense Department, the armed services and the National Security Agency - have become quiet, regular visitors to the FMC Corp. chemical plant here. Their mission is to learn more about chemical plants and how facilities designed to produce agricultural pesticides might be converted to make chemical and biological weapons by countries such as Iraq and India.
NEWS
March 16, 1999
WITHIN FIVE years, the lethal stockpile of 50-year-old chemical weapons stored at Aberdeen Proving Ground will be dissolved -- with a strong dose of hot water and sewage sludge. This month the federal Environmental Protection Agency approved plans to build a $306 million complex of buildings on the sprawling Army installation in Harford County, where 1,800 steel canisters of blistering mustard agent would be neutralized by 2004. EPA approval was essential to proceed with this method of disposing of the chemical warfare elements.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, making a renewed pitch for ratification of a treaty banning chemical weapons worldwide, beseeched the Senate yesterday to pass it, warning that failure to do so would put the United States "in the company of pariah nations.""America took the lead in negotiating the Chemical Weapons Convention, first the Reagan administration, then the Bush administration," Clinton said."America should stand with those who want to destroy chemical weapons, not with those who would defy the international community."
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