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Chemical Weapons

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Libya is close to completing the world's largest underground chemical weapons plant in a hollowed-out mountain 40 miles from Tripoli, U.S. intelligence services say.Col. Muammar el Kadafi, Libya's leader, says the project is an irrigation system. Western intelligence services say that is nonsense.The subterranean plant may be completed in 1997 or 1998 and is said to cover six square miles. It already stores most of Libya's stockpile of chemical weapons -- about 100 tons. If it goes into operation, the plant will be able to produce the ingredients for tons of poison gas a day, intelligence officials said.
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NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Michael A. Parker, deputy commander of one of Aberdeen Proving Ground's key commands, has been named acting director of a new Army agency designed to streamline and improve the storage and destruction of the nation's chemical weapons stockpile. The Chemical Materials Agency, a provisional agency expected to become a permanent entity in October, brings destruction and storage functions together under one umbrella, said Mickey Morales, spokesman for the Soldier and Biological Chemical Command.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- An international treaty that would ban the production and use of chemical weapons has run into surprising difficulty in the Senate, where conservative Republicans may be able to block its ratification this week.When the Bush administration signed the treaty in January 1993, Senate approval seemed almost certain. But with floor debate on the treaty set to begin today, all bets are off on the vote.Treaty opponents -- led by Republican Jesse Helms of North Carolina -- are using a variety of arguments against it, ranging from concerns about its effectiveness in limiting the use of chemical weapons to claims that thousands of U.S. businesses could be subjected to burdensome regulations and international inspections.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 14, 1993
PARIS -- With speaker after speaker evoking the horrors caused by poison gases used in World War I, more than 115 nations began to sign a dizzyingly complex treaty intended to forever ban the manufacture, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The attacks unleashed by the United States yesterday were achieved with scores of Navy missiles -- each weighing 2,650 pounds and with a range of 1,000 miles -- fired from ships in the Arabian Sea and Red Sea, government sources said.Defense officials provided few details of the strikes. But government sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday it was exclusively a Navy effort that involved 75 to 100 cruise missiles and no aircraft.The simultaneous missile attacks, which began about 1: 30 p.m. EDT, targeted alleged terrorist training sites in a remote region of Afghanistan south of Kabul, and an alleged chemical weapons site in an industrial area south of Khartoum, Sudan.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 5, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- U.S. forces searching captured Iraqi bases and scouring the battlefield have found Iraqi warplanes, artillery pieces and huge amounts of ammunition, but also a puzzling lack of any sign of chemical weapons.Search teams have failed to discover chemical munitions or clear evidence the munitions were ever present, according to officers at the U.S. military command, despite Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's repeated threats that his forces would use weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration has prepared an arms control plan that would ban Israel from producing material for nuclear weapons and would require Arab nations in the Middle East to give up their chemical weapons, administration officials said yesterday.President Bush hopes to announce the plan, which is certain to cause problems with the Israeli government, in a coming speech.The announcement has been delayed pending the return of Secretary of State James A. Baker III from a peace mission in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The destruction of aging chemical munitions at Aberdeen Proving Ground will be delayed at least seven months and could fall two years behind schedule because of congressional budget cuts, increasing the risk of leakage, defense officials say.Charging that the Army's program to destroy the nation's stockpile of chemical weapons is rife with lax financial management, Congress is cutting hundreds of millions from the program, a move that will...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Under pressure of a late April deadline, President Clinton launched yesterday what he promises will be a furious campaign to win Senate ratification of a treaty to 'N eliminate chemical weapons worldwide.Mindful of the need for Republican votes to approve the treaty, which has languished on Capitol Hill since 1993, Clinton invited a distinguished bipartisan cast of military and civilian leaders to join him yesterday on the South Lawn of the White House.Those gathered with Clinton under a glorious blue sky included former Secretary of State James A. Baker III, a veteran of the Reagan and Bush administrations; former Republican Sen. Nancy Kassebaum Baker of Kansas; former Democratic Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma; and Colin L. Powell, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
NEWS
September 14, 1996
SO GREAT is the Republican impulse to deny President Clinton bill-signing ceremonies before the November election that his opponent, Bob Dole, has slipped into a negative posture that strikes us as dumb politics. Acting somewhat as Senate majority leader in absentia, Citizen Dole has used his influence with some former colleagues to ditch two key pieces of legislation -- a wide-ranging reform of immigration laws and ratification of a Chemical Weapons Convention crafted during the Bush administration.
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