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Chemical Weapons

NEWS
By Lenny Siegel | September 25, 2013
Globally, chemical weapons demilitarization has been difficult, slow and costly, but with technologies that have been developed over the past two decades, the safe destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is feasible. While the diplomats work out the principles for sequestering and eliminating Syrian chemical warfare materiel, our government and others should be developing a strategy for safe, secure demilitarization. That work must begin now, not only because it will take time, but also because it is likely to raise issues that the diplomats will need to resolve.
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of environmental activists called on Congress yesterday to halt the Army's "reckless rush" to incinerate 30,000 tons of chemical weapons at eight U.S. sites, including Aberdeen Proving Ground, and asked for immediate funding of research into alternative disposal methods.In a Capitol Hill news conference, the Chemical Weapons Working Group said alternatives to burning would be safer and cheaper than the $9 billion cost of incineration. They said disassembly of the weapons and neutralization of the lethal chemical agents would meet the requirements of an international treaty for weapons destruction by 2005.
NEWS
By Elisa D. Harris | March 27, 2003
THE UNITED States is conducting what President Bush has described as a preventive war to eliminate Iraq's chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs. Statements by senior administration officials indicate that the United States may use chemical weapons of its own - so-called "nonlethal" riot control agents - against Iraqi troops if, for example, those troops use Iraqi civilians as human shields. Such actions are unlikely to protect innocent Iraqis from harm. They could also increase the risk to U.S. troops while violating one of the key disarmament agreements that U.S. military action is designed to uphold.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Congressional investigators say the Army is underestimating the cost of destroying its chemical weapons stockpiles at Aberdeen Proving Ground and seven other U.S. sites.In a report made public yesterday by a nationwide citizens group with members in Maryland and elsewhere, the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) said the program could cost taxpayers nearly $11.4 billion -- nearly a sevenfold increase over the original estimate of $1.7 billion.Two members of Congress, Democratic Rep. Glen Browder of Alabama and Republican Rep. James V. Hansen of Utah, also have introduced legislation requiring a strict financial review of the Army's Chemical Stockpile Emergency Pre- paredness Program, saying that there is little to show for the $200 million spent so far to protect communities near the stockpiles.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Evidence is mounting that Iraq attacked U.S. forces with chemical weapons during the Persian Gulf War, causing at least 185 U.S. troops to later fall ill with an array of disabling symptoms, according to a congressional report being released today.Thousands of other veterans became ill after toxic vapors were released during allied bombing of Iraqi chemical weapons factories, the investigation found.The Defense Department has maintained that the Iraqis did not use chemical weapons during the 1991 hostilities.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 4, 1991
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey -- Supporters of Kurdish guerrillas fighting for autonomy in Turkey have charged that Turkish forces used chemical agents to kill Kurdish insurgents.Turkish miliary authorities vehemently deny the charge. It is impossible to prove either side's contention, although the Kurdish side -- including members of the Kurdish parliamentary party -- has photographs purportedly showing disfigured bodies of Kurdish victims from an alleged chemical attack in June.A Kurdish burial party retrieved 10 bodies it said were found outside the city of Bingol in June.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
The debate over how to dispose of chemical weapons at Aberdeen Proving Ground and other Army bases moved to the air waves this month on Harford cable television public access Channel 15."Scrapping Chemical Weapons," was produced and paid for by the Center for Defense Information, a Washington think tank formed by military retirees that isfrequently critical of the Pentagon.The half-hour documentary reviews the familiar problems of reconciling the conflicts between arms control and protection of the environment.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | February 8, 1991
While American soldiers in the Persian Gulf are wondering whether Iraq will use chemical weapons against them, the Army is continuing its long fight about how and where to destroy aging stocks of such poison munitions at home.The Army will hold a public meeting Tuesday on its plan to incinerate a stockpile of old mustard agent at Aberdeen Proving Ground, where U.S. chemical warfare research began in 1917. The proving ground stores about 5 percent of the Army's old chemical agents, or about 1,500 tons out of an estimated 30,000 tons.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
Lt. Col. Michael I. D'Andries was preparing German-built chemical detection vehicles for the U.S. Army at the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground last August when Iraq invaded Kuwait.D'Andries' studies on the chemical detection vehicle, called the Fox, could not havecome at a more crucial time.Now, as an American-led ground attack to free Kuwait could be imminent, if not underway, the threat of Iraq's arsenal of chemical weapons has coalition soldiers on the battlefield at great risk.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a sharp policy shift, the Bush administration is offering to renounce the use of chemical weapons and to destroy all its stockpiles if an international agreement to ban such weapons can be reached.The proposal was to be presented to the Conference on Disarmament today in Geneva, where it is intended to jumpstart stalled negotiations. Although President Bush made chemical warfare the centerpiece of his disarmament focus for nearly a decade, there has previously been little progress.
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